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Digg Like A Pro with Firefox & Greasemonkey

Digg Like A Pro with Firefox & Greasemonkey

The ‘democratic’ news site, Digg, is a great way to share interesting items as well as keeping track of what’s making waves around the net.

Naturally, once you get into the process – creating Diggs, digging Dugg stories etc – you want to make things easier and quicker. Here are a few Firefox extensions and Greasemonkey scripts that work well to do so.

Firefox Extensions

Netscape’s Digg Tracker – a button that notifies you when your Digg friends have been active. When they comment or Digg anything, the button will let you know. If you click it, a sidebar with all your contacts and their activities will appear.

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Modeled on Netscape’s Friends’ Activity Sidebar, it will also show 5-10 of the top recent items from Netscape.

Digg Like A Pro with Firefox & Greasemonkey

    Digg.com Comment Spotlight – this comes in handy if you want to scroll right to the comments with the most Diggs. You can set a marker for the average Digg so you only have comments with a certain popularity highlighted. Colors are customizable.

    Smart Digg Button – Unlike the other Digg This buttons out there, this one will track Diggs for any site you surf to. The button will display how many times any site on the web has been Dugg, if none, you can Digg it. Simple. Sits in your status bar.

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    Greasemonkey Scripts

    Digg Like A Pro with Firefox & Greasemonkey

      Add Digg Control – after surfing to the original site that’s been Dugg, a hovering badge will appear that you can drag where you want. This allows you to Digg the site without going back to Digg.com while displaying the Digg count. Also see Digg Me Later! for an attractive alternative.

      Digg Add Mirrors – there are a few scripts that add Digg mirrors to each item in case the Digg Effect occurs and takes down the original site. This one is on top because it fits itself right underneath the Digg button with four little icons that forward you to the DuggMirror, Coral Cache, Google Cache and Archive.org wayback machine of every story.

      Double points because the links also fit snuggly with the aforementioned Add Digg Control badge.

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      Digg Deep – useful if you have the Digg RSS in your feed reader, this script bypasses the Digg comments page and goes straight to the original. Beware: if you try to go to the article’s Digg comments page it will automatically forward you to the original. I suggest enabling while using your feed reader and disabling while on Digg.

      Digg comment box on top – aside from doing the obvious -moving the input box from below all the comments to above -this script also show a few stats up top: Average Diggs, Positive Average and Negative Average.

      Digg Search replaced by a Google CSE with Hierarchies – this script enables you to switch from the regular Digg search to a custom Google Digg search by double clicking the input. The custom search is handy because you can choose the topics to search within.

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      Digg Like A Pro with Firefox & Greasemonkey

        Digg Custom Tabs – enables you to add extra tabs to the Digg topics tab bar. After performing a search, a Save Search link makes it easy to add it to the tab bar. The tab bar will show a Customize link, where you can also take out existing topics and their sub-topics.

        Have your own to share?

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        The Gentle Art of Saying No

        The Gentle Art of Saying No

        No!

        It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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        But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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        What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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        But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

        1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
        2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
        3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
        4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
        5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
        6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
        7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
        8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
        9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
        10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

        Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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