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Dealing with Downsizing: How to Prepare

Dealing with Downsizing: How to Prepare

    It’s awful to hang around an office where everyone knows that job cuts are coming. There’s a sense that everyone’s just waiting for the shoe to drop. No one in the office wants to lose their job and go through the horrors of the job hunt. At the same time, though, no one wants to be the guy left at the end — the guy now doing the work of the ten other people that used to make up his team.

    There’s a benefit to seeing the writing on the wall, though. You know downsizing is coming, and that will let you plan your next move. If you can opt out of the fear that seems to engulf offices on the edge, why wouldn’t you want to?

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    Decide What You Want

    Your first step has to be deciding what you want. Maybe you really enjoy your job — maybe you’re willing to do the work of as many people as necessary to keep your comfortable job. If that’s the case, it’s worth going to your supervisor and informing them of that fact. In my experience, just informing them is enough. Don’t ask for a way to prove it; don’t try to subtly suggest it. If you’re on the ‘Maybe’ list, though, you’ve probably just tipped yourself on to the ‘Keep’ list.

    But the opposite is equally likely. You could be just punching that time clock. Are you ready to move on? If so, don’t wait for the axe to fall. Start planning your escape: hunt for a new job or plan another first step. As soon as you’re ready to move on, approach your boss about negotiating your last few days. If job cuts have been announced, you can probably negotiate for the full severance package they were going to offer. If the plans to downsize are still very quiet, it’s harder to request a severance package but not impossible. Don’t run out the clock, though. You might be surprised to learn that you’re on the ‘Keep’ list when you already had your bags packed. Worse, you might prevent one of your peers who really wanted to stay from doing so.

    Prepare for the Job Hunt

    Even if you’re hoping to stay on, you need a Plan B. When in doubt, looking for a new job is a pretty solid alternative. I’d recommend it even to the folks who are fairly sure of their job security. Nothing, after all, is certain.

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    Everyone knows the standard routine of the job hunt, of course:

    1. Polish your resume until it gleams.
    2. Send out copies.
    3. Network.
    4. Interview with prospective employers.
    5. Land the job.

    There are a few extra steps worth considering, however. Rather than spending all your time perfecting your resume, why not put together a portfolio? A few excellent samples of your work can go much further in convincing a prospective employer than any college degree. And while portfolios used to be solely the domain of artists, they can provide a boost to a host of other careers as well. Are you a software developer? You can use applications you’ve worked on in your portfolio. Are you a house painter? Take a few pictures of houses you’ve worked on and submit them with your application.

    You can also step outside the box on networking. Rather than asking friends of friends if their companies are hiring, it might be worth it to meet people entirely outside your current network. Try going outside your circle of friends: go to Meetups, join clubs and get out of your normal routine. It will up your odds of finding a new position significantly. Think of it this way: other members of your network are sure to work for the same company that’s planning on laying you off. Your connections may have several people asking them about jobs. Best to step out of that situation, if you can.

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    Or Plan Something Else

    Another job in the same career path may not be your ideal next step. There are other jobs besides putting yourself on the job market: you can start your own business, go back to school or change careers. The transition may not be as easy as a job hunt can be, but it can be very gratifying. Knowing that you have a few more days of pay and perhaps even a severance package to help you make the change, though, can make it a little less scary. You have a buffer to write a business plan or submit grad school applications, so why not take advantage of it?

    Don’t forget that there’s no rule saying that you can’t be writing a business plan while you send out resumes, either. You have an opportunity to steer your career right now, and it’s always easier to do now rather than later.

    Either Way…

    No matter what you are planning for your next big step, there are a few smaller steps to take care of in the mean time that can make the whole process easier.

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    • Arrange for insurance coverage. COBRA may be your best bet if you’ll be changing jobs.
    • Look for some work to fill in the gaps, such as freelance work or temp jobs. Most of us just can’t suddenly be without an income.
    • Warn the significant people in your life that change is coming. Your parents, significant other, etc. are likely to worry if you announce that you no longer have a job. You don’t necessarily have an obligation to stop them from worrying, but telling them that you have a plan can do just that.

    Any other recommendations for handling downsizing? Please add them in the comments!

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    Last Updated on September 10, 2019

    How to Master the Art of Prioritization

    How to Master the Art of Prioritization

    Do you know that prioritization is an art? It is an art that will lead you to success in whatever area that matters to you.

    By prioritization, I’m not talking so much about assigning tasks, but deciding which will take chronological priority in your day—figuring out which tasks you’ll do first, and which you’ll leave to last.

    Effective Prioritization

    There are two approaches to “prioritizing” the tasks in your to-do list that I see fairly often:

    Approach #1 Tackling the Biggest Tasks First and Getting Them out of the Way

    The idea is that by tackling them first, you deal with the pressure and anxiety that builds up and prevents you from getting anything done—whether we’re talking about big or small tasks. Leo Babauta is a proponent of this Big Rocks method.[1]

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    Approach #2 Tackling the Tasks You Can Get Done Quickly and Easily, with Minimal Effort

    Proponents of this method believe that by tackling the small fries first, you’ll have less noise distracting you from the periphery of your consciousness.

    If you believe in getting your email read and responded to, making phone calls and getting Google Reader zeroed before you dive into the high-yield work, you’re a proponent of this method. I suppose you could say Getting Things Done (GTD) encourages this sort of method, since the methodology advises followers to tackle tasks that can be completed within two minutes, right there and then.

    Figure out Your Approach for Prioritization

    My own approach is perhaps a mixture of the two.

    I’ll write out my daily task list and draw little priority stars next to the three items I need to get done that day. They don’t need to be big tasks, but nine times out of ten, they are.

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    Smaller tasks are rarely important enough to warrant a star in the first place; I can always get away without even checking my inbox until the next day if I’m swamped, and the people who need to get in touch with me super quickly know how.

    But I’m not recommending my system of prioritization to you. I’m also not saying that mine is better than Leo’s Big Rocks method, and I’m not saying it’s better than the “if it can be done quickly, do it first” method either.

    The thing with prioritization is that knowing when to do what relies very much on you and the way you work. Some people need to get some small work done to find a sense of accomplishment and clarity that allows them to focus on and tackle bigger items. Others need to deal with the big tasks or they’ll get caught up in the busywork of the day and never move on, especially when that Google Reader count just refuses to get zeroed (personally, I recommend the Mark All As Read button—I use it most days!).

    I’m in between, because my own patterns can be all over the place. Some days I will be ready to rip into massive projects at 7AM. Other times I’ll feel the need to zero every inbox I have and clean up the papers on my desk before I can focus on anything serious. I also know that my peak, efficient working time doesn’t come at 11AM or 3PM or some specific time like it does for many people, but I have several peaks divided by a few troughs. I can feel what’s coming on when and try to keep my schedule liquid enough that I can adapt.

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    That’s why I use a starred task list system rather than a scheduled task list. It allows me to trust myself (something that I suppose takes a certain amount of discipline) and achieve peak efficiency by blowing with the winds. If I fight the peaks and troughs, I’ll get less done; but if I do certain kinds of work in each period of the day as they come, I’ll get more done than most others in a similar line of work.

    You may not be able to trust yourself to that extent without falling into the busywork trap. You may not be able to tackle big tasks first thing in the morning without feeling like you’re pushing against an invisible brick wall that won’t budge. You might not be able to deal with small tasks before the big tasks without feeling pangs of guilt and urgency.

    My point is:

    The prioritization systems themselves don’t matter. They’re all pretty good for a group of people, not least of all to the people who espouse them because they use them and find them effective.

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    What matters is that you don’t fall for one set of dogma (and I’m not saying Leo Babauta or David Allen preach these things as dogma, but sometimes their proponents do) until you’ve tried the systems extensively, and found which method of chronological prioritization works for you.

    And if the system you already use works great, then there’s no need to bother trying others—in the world of personal productivity, it’s too easy to mess with something that works and find yourself unable to get back into your former groove.

    “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

    In truth, this principle applies to all sorts of personal productivity issues, though it’s important to know which issues it applies to.

    If you thought multitasking worked well for you each day and I’d have to contend that you are wrong—multitasking is a universal myth in my books! But if you find yourself prioritizing tasks that never get done, you might need to reconsider which of the above approaches you’re using and change to a system that is more personally effective.

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    Featured photo credit: Sabri Tuzcu via unsplash.com

    Reference

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