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Contest: My Moleskine 2.0

Contest: My Moleskine 2.0

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    Stepcase Lifehack is partnering up with Moleskine and Hong Kong retailer city’super/LOG-ON to give you a chance to show us – and the world – what you can do with a Moleskine notebook. Moleskines are the notebook of choice for creative professionals around the world, and have become a symbol of latter-day nomadism – nobody carrying a Moleskine is ever without a place to capture their most brilliant thoughts!

    To celebrate the intimate relationship between lifehacking digital nomads and the Moleskine notebook, Moleskine, Stepcase Lifehack, and city’super/LOG-ON invite you to enter the My Moleskine 2.0 competition. My Moleskine 2.0 is devoted to giving tips and tricks to improve your quality of life by automating, increasing productivity and organising.

    Share your ideas, be selected for an innovative exhibition, and win a lifetime supply of Moleskine notebooks!

    We want to see your best ideas for hacking your Moleskine – whether to make the ultimate productivity-enhancing tool or the perfect outlet for all your most creative urges. Show us what you can do and you might win free Moleskines for life.

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    The folks at Moleskine will select the most creative entries, which will be displayed in the My Moleskine 2.0 Exhibition that will take place in all city’super and LOG-ON stores in Hong Kong in July 2009. Your hack will also be presented on moleskine.com, moleskineasia.com, and on Lifehack.

    In-store and web viewers will be able to vote on their favorites, and the winners will receive one of these great prizes:

    • 1st prize: a lifetime supply of Moleskine notebooks!
    • 2nd prize: collection of 25 Moleskine notebooks and diaries
    • 3rd prize: collection of 15 Moleskine notebooks and diaries
    • All other exhibited entries: set of 3 Moleskine notebooks

    Send us your idea on how to make and do things better, faster, more creative and innovative, for both work and leisure with your Moleskine notebook!

    How to participate

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    This competition is open to all regardless of age, nationality, sex and location. There is no application fee. Selected entrants will have to purchase the Moleskine and prepare the hack for the exhibition, but will receive 3 Moleskine notebooks as a prize once their finished work is received.

    Application Procedure

    Submit your best idea using the application form at the bottom of this post. You may be contacted for further information after the first round of judging. Entries must be received before May 31st, 2009. Make sure you present your idea clearly. Your idea should fall within one of the following category:

    • Creativity and imagination
    • Organization and productivity
    • Archive and memory
    • Fun and innovative hacks

    The competition is in different stages:

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    1. Applications are due  May 31st, 2009.
    2. By early June, 2009, selected entries will be announced.
    3. Selected participants will have to purchase a Moleskine and prepare the hack following the submitted idea. (Entries will be selected by Moleskine; all decisions are final.)
    4. By June 30th, 2009: the hacked Moleskine must be sent to Moleskine Asia at the address provided.
    5. Submitted Moleskines will be displayed at the My Moleskine 2.0 Exhibition in July and a winner selected at the end of the Exhibition.

    Selection Criteria

    The best entries will be selected according to their originality, creativity, usefulness, feasibility and design.

    My Moleskine 2.0 Exhibition

    If you’re in Hong Kong in July, be sure to stop by city’super or LOG-ON to see the exhibition!

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    Date: July 15th – 30th, 2009

    Venue: city’super, LOG-ON, Hong Kong

    The selected Moleskine will be displayed in transparent boxes, so that audience can peruse them at their own pace. Ideas and “how to” will be displayed as well on panels. city’super and LOG-ON customers will be invited to vote and select their favorite Moleskine hacks.


    “Lifetime supply” is limited to 5 notebooks per year over a period of 50 years.

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    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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