Advertising
Advertising

Complete iPhone Links List: Apps, Hacks & Reviews

Complete iPhone Links List: Apps, Hacks & Reviews
iPhone

    Rockin’ Out with iPhone

    Advertising

    As groovy as the iPhone is, it is missing a lot of stuff. In response to this a cottage industry of sorts has popped up in response. Whether you have a iPhone today or plan to get one some time in the future, here is a list of super cool links that can help you realize more functionality, and keep on top of the latest iPhone hacks and reviews.

    Advertising

    iPhone Friendly Applications to Bookmark

    Surf to these links on your iPhone and bookmark them for future reference.

    Advertising

    • MockDock – a launchpad that offers approximately 50 iPhone web applications. Includes some superstars like gOffice (where you can actually create a word document from your iPhone!) Soduko, Digg, iDelicious, and many more.
    • iPhone Apps Manager – this is another launchpad list of 69+ applications, games, social networking and entertainment links.
    • iPhone Application List– links to a few games and applications not seen elsewhere such as iTiles and Dragon Fury.
    • Ta-da List – free online to-do list from 37Signals. When you visit it from your iPhone you’ll automatically see a iPhone friendly version.
    • LifeHacker Top 10 iPhone applications

    iPhone Reviews and Hacks

    Advertising

    • Hackintosh Forum for iPhone: discuss your iphone, ask questions, find answers.
    • Wired Reviews: – several good reviews of iPhone from different perspectives.
    • iPhoneHacks – lots of cutting edge information about hacking the iPhone.
    • Engadget iSwitchers – massive user discussion on people who have switched and love their iphone, and people who have returned their iPhones and why. Comparisions with many smart phones in the comments section.
    • WSJ Walter Mossberg review – comprehensive user experience review that includes comparision chart with Samsung Blackjack, Blackberry 8800, and Treo 700p
    • cNet review – includes video review, and user reviews too.
    • PC Magazine review – includes specs, pros, cons, bottomline, and photo slideshow.
    • Engadget review – 3 part series.
    • NYTimes Review – comprehensive user experience review with videos and more.
    • NYTimes iPhone FAQ got questions? This FAQ has answers!

    If you found this resource helpful, why not bookmark this today on Delicious or your favorite bookmarking site? Thanks and enjoy!

    K. Stone is author of Life Learning Today, a blog about daily life improvements. A few of her most popular articles are Ultimate Goal Setting Guide, How to Stop Being “Busy” and Live Your Dream Life, How to Write a Book in 60 Days or Less, Decision Making Made Easy, and The Ultimate iPhone Decision Tool.

    More by this author

    Solutions for 7 Annoying Modern Day Problems The Two F-Words You Should Love Opportunity Overload Solutions for 10 MORE Annoying Modern Day Problems Tapping into the Fountain of Youth

    Trending in Featured

    1The Gentle Art of Saying No 26 Proven Ways To Make New Habits Stick 3Simple Productivity: 10 Ways to Do More by Focusing on the Essentials 4Back to Basics: Your Calendar 550 Ways to Increase Productivity and Achieve More in Less Time

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    No!

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

    Advertising

    But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

    Advertising

    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

    Advertising

    But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

    1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
    2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
    3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
    4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
    5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
    6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
    7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
    8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
    9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
    10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

    Advertising

    Read Next