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Building A Good Credit Score: 5 Tips

Building A Good Credit Score: 5 Tips

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    Having a solid credit score has been important for quite a while now, but it’s actually becoming more important these days as lending tightens up. There’s a reason that the Fair Isaac Corporation — the organization that calculates the credit score that most major lenders rely on — has been changing the way that credit scores are calculated. All of these circumstances add up to the fact that even someone who is confident that their credit score is good should be making sure it stays that way. There are some relatively simple steps, though, that you can take to help yourself build up your credit score, as well as maintain it.

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    1. Get A Copy of Your Credit Report

    Although you can’t get your exact credit score for free, you can get a free copy of your credit report from each of the three credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) once each year. To do so, visit AnnualCreditReport.com and request a report. AnnualCreditReport.com, by the way, is actually the only way to get your reports for free — the site was created in response to federal legislation requiring that the three national credit reporting companies inform consumers about their status. Despite their catchy commercials, companies like FreeCreditReport.com actually wind up charging you for expenses related to obtaining your credit report.

    2. Make Sure You’re Aware of Any Existing Accounts

    Typically, your credit report will show any accounts you have open — although different companies report to different credit bureaus, and some companies don’t seem to report at all. It’s easy to forget about credit accounts that you don’t actually use, like credit cards you stopped using but chose not to close the account ‘just in case.’ These credit accounts can easily represent the most likely upcoming dings to your credit: card companies and other lenders have started closing inactive accounts in order to limit their liability. As the amount of credit a person has goes down, so does their credit score. I’m not suggesting that you should start charging items to those inactive accounts, though — instead, it’s enough to be aware of them so that if your accounts do close, you won’t be taken by surprise.

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    3. Set Up Automatic Payments

    One of the easiest credit score factors you can control is how good you are about making payments on your current balances. Even if you don’t usually carry a balance, making a payment or two late can cause a preventable dip in your credit score. A simple slip up, like forgetting to send a payment, can have some major consequences. While FICO scores will be offering more leniency for someone who misses only one payment, automatic payments can be a simple way of avoiding even one late payment and any problem at all. Late and missed payments can have ripple affects beyond your actual credit score as well — in some cases, including credit cards, a missed payment on one account can lead to a higher interest rate on another account.

    4. Get Serious About Your Balances

    One of the factors in a good credit score is how much credit you have available. That means that reducing your current balances has a direct connection to helping your credit score. That doesn’t mean that you have to pay off your entire balance immediately to improve your credit score, though: while it’s a good overall goal, just adding a few dollars to your minimum monthly payment is enough to at least get you started on an upwards trend. Moving around debt, say to a zero-interest credit card, doesn’t actually help with your overall credit score. While it may make the amount easier to pay off, it can be reflected in your credit score as an inability to manage your existing credit.

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    5. Keep Your Number of Cards Constant

    While your available credit is a key factor in your credit score, opening a bunch of new credit cards just to increase the amount of credit you have available won’t really help. Instead, the system used to determine credit scores reads such a move as a need for more credit: if you open several cards in a short time span, credit reporting agencies assume that you plan to use that credit and might even be planning to get yourself into some trouble with it. Closing unused credit cards can also have a negative impact on your credit, so keeping your number of cards constant is usually the best compromise between getting the best credit card options and maintaining your good credit score. Your account age can also play into things, by the way. That first credit card you ever got, with its awful interest rate, may be an important part of your credit score. Think carefully before closing such an account.

    Your Credit Score and You

    Despite many ads to the contrary, there is really no way to fix your credit score in a hurry. The Fair Isaac Corporation works hard to make sure that credit scores indicate how you use credit over time, and the company knows what it’s doing. That means that you have to work on maintaining a good credit score long before you want to make a big purchase, like a house or a car. Since it’s not always predictable exactly when a person is going make those large purchases, it makes sense to make a good credit score an ongoing priority.

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    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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