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Blog Action Day Revisited

Blog Action Day Revisited

Monday the 15th October saw the Blog Action Day project begin. Kicking things off with the very and, maybe always, timely topic of the environment.

In my mind, it was a success. And to celebrate how much the blogging community got on board, I want to share some of the best posts that came out of Blog Action Day.

Blog Action Day Stats

Seven tips for how simultaneously to boost your happiness and safeguard the environment (in your own small way) by The Happiness Project suggests some simple practices to make you feel better about yourself and the environment.

Leveraging Ideas suggests there may be an environmental impact from virtual worlds such as SecondLife in Environmental Concerns In Virtual Worlds.

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GearFire Student Productivity has 6 tips to save on the electricity your computer uses while hinting to taking public transport while away from the monitor in 7 Ways To Conserve Precious, Precious Electricity.

Cranking Widgets’ Tips For Environmentally Friendly GTD are using either recycled paper, digital tools instead of paper, or at least using the entire sheet of paper!

On a similar note is Kate Davis’ idea of Using GTD To Reduce Negative Environmental Impacts. After all, GTD is for everything and everybody.

Want to start Getting To Know Your Environment? David Seah tells you how:

More importantly with regards to me, I need to live in it. Even more specifically, I need to be aware of it. From a purely selfish reason, there may be secrets in the Environment that will help me in much the same way that hike through Winchester opened my eyes to just how much more glorious Nature could be, and how I could be bound with it.

If you work from home you may already be doing your part saving the environment, says Success From The Nest as Simply Thrifty talks about your water usage.

Lifehacker has some Easy Ways To Live Greener with software, tips and hacks. If you want to put your two cents in they have a poll for each idea.

Leo at ZenHabits goes all out giving us 5 Ways To Save the World, While Getting Fitter, Saving Money, Simplifying, and Becoming Happier. The topic was only the environment, right?! :)

Scott H Young goes a similar route with Save The World And Improve Your Health At The Same Time. His final suggestion to Get Involved is a vital element when discussing any of these posts. What good is a Blog Day without the Action?

If you think your job can’t be friendly to our environment, then check out Top 5 reasons green workplaces make their employees happy at work by the Chief Happiness Officer Alex Kjerulf.

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Ririan simplifies things again with 10 Simple Ways You Can Save the Planet and Money while The Positivity Blog has 20 Simple Ways to Help the Environment by Using Your Computer.

The Dumb Little Man himself, Jay White, shows us a few Items You Never Thought To Recycle like car batteries and shoes. Pst, have you noticed I’m just recycling blog posts?

Freelance Folder’s How We Can Help Save The Earth drew upon stats, Jon’s own environmental tips as well as a plethora of Blog Action Day resources like this one. Apparently only 3-5% of plastics are recycled in any way!

Get into the habit of things with OrganizeIT and 20 Tips For Laying The Foundations Of Your Environmentally Friendly Habit.

LifeDev has some controversial suggestions like If It’s Yellow Let It Mellow, If It’s Brown Flush It Down. There are indeed Small Changes In Your Bathroom, Big Benefits For The Environment.

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The environmental wellness principle is a term that I’m going to coin right now. If you aren’t benefiting the environment, you’re harming it. It’s as simple as that. If you’re reading this, you have internet access, which means you know, or can easily find out, many ways to be environmentally friendly. The only thing that remains is to choose benefit over harm.

That’s a big call from Alex Shalman, but we understand what he’s saying. It’s that old ‘if you’re not with us, you’re against us’ mentality that is very warranted in this day and age.

blog action day

On that note, we end with Dustin’s excellent post over here at Lifehack.org called You The Consumer. It includes a brief history of consumerism as well as a checklist for those of us trying to become better shoppers, environmentalists, human beings.

Please feel free to add your own favorites. Over 20,000 blogs participated so be sure to check out BlogActionDay.org to read about them all.

It’s almost a week on, how do you think it went? What have you been doing in response? What are your suggestions for next year?

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More by this author

Craig Childs

Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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