Advertising
Advertising

Beginner’s Guide: Run Linux like any other program in Windows

Beginner’s Guide: Run Linux like any other program in Windows
20060131-fedora.jpg

    There are many reasons people are hesitant to try Linux. The biggest of these reasons is that installing Linux generally requires people to do a list of difficult and unfamiliar tasks. However, I am going to introduce “virtualization” which is a fancy term for running Linux like any other program in Windows. The following article will guide you through the process of setting up Linux so you can run it like any other program in Windows. Don’t be intimated, these directions are designed for the absolute beginner and will not require you to do anything unfamiliar, threatening, or permanent to your computer. When you are finished you will be able to run Linux like any other program in Windows and share files between Linux and Windows.

    The first step is to install VMWare Player. This is a free program and it installs just like any other Windows program. You can go to the VMWare player homepage and download it. You will have to answer a short survey.

    Advertising

    The second step is to download Linux. There are many different kinds of Linux with varying programs and setups. Understanding this can be difficult if you have never tried Linux. You can compare the different versions of Linux to Windows XP. There is Windows XP Home, Windows XP Professional, and Windows XP Media Center Edition. When you download Linux, it will be in the format of .ISO. Don’t worry if you have never seen this file type before. I will list several different versions of Linux below. You need to download only one version. The different flavors of Linux differ in size and thus, how long they will take to download. For the remainer of this tutorial, I will be using a version of Linux known as Fedora. However, it is 682MB in size and can take a long time to download. If you do not want to wait for Fedora you can complete the remainer of this tutorial equally well with any other version of Linux. Please note that this list is by no means exhaustive and there are hunderds of other versions of Linux available. I wanted to compile a short list to make choosing easier:
    Fedora (682 MB)
    Ubuntu (698.4 MB)
    Suse (679.3 MB)
    Damn Small Linux (50.8 MB)
    Puppy Linux (84 MB)

    20060131-files.jpg

      The third step is to setup VMWare to communicate with Linux. You need to do this by downloading a file from Wolphination.The following is the direct link: OS.zip. After you download OS.zip extract its contents to your C: drive. You should now have C:OS. Inside the OS folder I want you to put your version of Linux. So on my computer, inside C:OS I have OS.VMX, OS.vmdk, and FC-6-i386-livecd-1.iso (this is shown above). We are almost ready to run Linux for the first time.

      Advertising

      The fourth step is to setup your VMWare configuration file. This file is called OS.VMX you need to right click on this file and select “Open with…” and choose Notepad. On the line that says ide1:0.fileName “C:Your file” you need to change this to point to the Linux version you downloaded. So in my case it would get changed to C:OSFC-6-i386-livecd-1.iso. Now resave the file and you are ready to go. Click on OS.vmx and VMWare will open and Linux will start. It may take a minute or two for Linux to fire up (depending on how much RAM your computer has).

      20060131-icon.jpg

        Congratulations, you can now run Linux like any other program in Windows! In order to create a shortcut to put on your desktop, right click OS.VMX and choose Create Shortcut. Drag the shortcut to your desktop (or the location of your choice) and Linux will launch when you click it. My shortcut is shown above.

        Advertising

        Sharing files between Linux and Windows
        Using Linux on Windows will be much more helpful if you can share files between Linux and Windows. This process is really easy to set up. The first thing you need to do is to create a “New Folder” on your Windows desktop. Right click on the folder and choose “Sharing and Security…”. On the following screen, choose “Share this folder on the network” and “Allow network users to change my files.” This will let Linux read and write to the folder.

        20060131-sharing.jpg

          In Linux, go to Places >> Network Servers and you should see your computer. Double click on your computer and you will see all your shared folders. Any data you would like to be used in both Linux and Windows should be saved into this folder.

          Advertising

          Please feel free to pose any questions in the comments. We will walk you through any portion of this process if you get stuck. Enjoy!

          Notes: the following notes are somewhat technical in detail:
          1. The download links listed above are for “Live CDs.” Live CDs allow you to use Linux without installing anything on your hard drive.
          2. If the mirrors linked to above are very slow, you can find alternative download links on the homepage of each version of Linux.
          3. Since Linux will be running as a Live CD, if you powerdown and exit the virtual machine (exit VMWare) you will lose your information. However, there is a way around this. Simply choose “suspend” and VMWare will suspend and exit your virtual machine state. This will not take any memory and will allow you to “save” data to your virtual machine.
          4. The above steps work equally well on Linux and Mac.

          More by this author

          The daily routine of 17 CEOs Productivity Boost: How to start your day at 5:00 AM Search social media content Four ways to automatically backup your hard drive 10 Unconventional Diet Tips: How to lose 50 pounds in three months

          Trending in Featured

          1 8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times 2 The Pros and Cons of Working from Home 3 How To Study Effectively: 7 Simple Tips 4 7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks 5 5 Practical Ways to Get Over a Mental Block

          Read Next

          Advertising
          Advertising
          Advertising

          Last Updated on October 6, 2020

          8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times

          8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times

          Many of us find ourselves in motivational slumps that we have to work to get out of. Sometimes it’s like a continuous cycle where we are motivated for a period of time, fall out and then have to build things back up again.

          There is nothing more powerful for self-motivation than the right attitude. You can’t choose or control your circumstance, but you can choose your attitude towards your circumstances.

          How I see this working is while you’re developing these mental steps, and utilizing them regularly, self-motivation will come naturally when you need it.

          The key, for me, is hitting the final step to Share With Others. It can be somewhat addictive and self-motivating when you help others who are having trouble.

          A good way to have self motivation continuously is to implement something like these 8 steps from Ian McKenzie.[1] I enjoyed Ian’s article but thought it could use some definition when it comes to trying to build a continuous drive of motivation. Here is a new list on how to self motivate:

          1. Start Simple

          Keep motivators around your work area – things that give you that initial spark to get going.

          Advertising

          These motivators will be the Triggers that remind you to get going.

          2. Keep Good Company

          Make more regular encounters with positive and motivated people. This could be as simple as IM chats with peers or a quick discussion with a friend who likes sharing ideas.

          Positive and motivated people are very different from the negative ones. They will help you grow and see opportunities during tough times.

          Here’re more reasons why you should avoid negative people: 10 Reasons Why You Should Avoid Negative People

          3. Keep Learning

          Read and try to take in everything you can. The more you learn, the more confident you become in starting projects.

          You can train yourself to crave lifelong learning with these tips: How to Develop a Lifelong Learning Habit

          Advertising

          4. See the Good in Bad

          When encountering obstacles or challenging goals, you want to be in the habit of finding what works to get over them.

          Here are 10 tips to make positive thinking easy.

          5. Stop Thinking

          Just do. If you find motivation for a particular project lacking, try getting started on something else. Something trivial even, then you’ll develop the momentum to begin the more important stuff.

          When you’re thinking and worrying about it too much, you’re just wasting time. These tried worry busting techniques can help you.

          6. Know Yourself

          Keep notes on when your motivation sucks and when you feel like a superstar. There will be a pattern that, once you are aware of, you can work around and develop.

          Read for yourself how the magic of marking down your mood works.

          Advertising

          7. Track Your Progress

          Keep a tally or a progress bar for ongoing projects. When you see something growing, you will always want to nurture it.

          Take a look at these 4 simple ways to track your progress so you have motivation to achieve your goals.

          8. Help Others

          Share your ideas and help friends get motivated. Seeing others do well will motivate you to do the same. Write about your success and get feedback from readers.

          Helping others actually helps yourself, here’s why.

          What I would hope happens here is you will gradually develop certain skills that become motivational habits.

          Once you get to the stage where you are regularly helping others keep motivated – be it with a blog or talking with peers – you’ll find the cycle continuing where each facet of staying motivated is refined and developed.

          Advertising

          In this episode of The Lifehack Show, Justin has some great tips as well:

          Too Many Steps?

          If you could only take one step? Just do it!

          Once you get started on something, you’ll almost always just get into it and keep going. There will be times when you have to do things you really don’t want to: that’s where the other steps and tips from other writers come in handy.

          However, the most important thing, that I think is worth repeating, is to just get started.

          Get that momentum going and then when you need to, take Ian’s Step 7 and Take A Break. No one wants to work all the time!

          More Tips for Boosting Motivation

          Featured photo credit: Japheth Mast via unsplash.com

          Reference

          [1] Ian McKenzie: 8 mental steps to self-motivation

          Read Next