Advertising
Advertising

7 Tips to Get on the Property Ladder

7 Tips to Get on the Property Ladder
house-oxford

    Despite the much publicised problems in the US Housing Market, there are still many long term advantages to buying a house in preference to renting.

    Buying a house has historically been a good investment; since 1945, house prices have increased faster than inflation and have also outperformed the stock market. Also, buying a house gives you the opportunity to live rent free when you have paid off the mortgage. Mortgages do fluctuate with interest rates. However, generally, mortgages become easier to pay over time. If your mortgage payments are currently $800 a month, this may seem alot, but if you income rises, then as a % of income, your mortgage will eventually fall.

    Despite the financial benefits, buying your first house can prove difficult because of the high prices we currently face.

    These are some tips for buying your first house.

    1. Save a deposit.

    Advertising

    As soon as possible try to put money aside for a deposit. If you have a good sized deposit, mortgage lenders have more confidence in lending bigger amounts of money. This is because you are less likely to suffer from negative equity. The problem is that to save a decent % of a house can take many years of careful saving. However, with house prices currently stagnant, it has become a little easier.

    2. Borrow From Parents.

    Depending on your circumstances, this may be an option. There are several drawbacks to this approach. But, for many it provides the only realistic hope of getting on the property ladder. Parents may be able to release equity from the value of their house and lend you money (hopefully for a very low interest) this can provide the necessary deposit to buy your house. Many parents are willing to do this because they realise that their generation has benefited significantly from rising house prices. In extreme circumstances parents may be willing to act as a guarantor for your mortgage.

    3. Joint Mortgage.

    Advertising

    It is becoming increasingly popular for young single people to combine their incomes with others so that they can afford a mortgage. Their own salary is insufficient. But, by buying with other people you effectively double your income, and this can enable you to buy a house. However, there are drawbacks. Firstly, you only will only own a 50% share in the house. Secondly, if you fall out with the other person, it can create an awkward situation, both financially and domestically.

    4. Interest Only Mortgage.

    This means you only pay interest on your mortgage loan. This means it is a cheaper repayment. However, there is a big disadvantage. At the end of the 30 year period, you still owe the entire mortgage loan. Interest only mortgages will only work if you can find an alternative way to invest in paying off the debt.

    5. 50 Year Mortgage.

    Advertising

    A 50 year mortgage means that you spread repayments over 50 years rather than the standard 25 years. It means that monthly payments will be lower than a 25 year mortgage. The drawback is that you end up paying more interest payments over the course of the mortgage. However, it is likely to still be a better option than renting. Also, if you income increases in the future, you can always reduce the mortgage term at a later date.

    6. Move to a Cheaper Area.

    House prices in some areas are much cheaper. If you are willing to move to these areas then you can make buying a house a real possibility. Maybe in the future you can move back to more desirable areas. It is worth bearing in mind that cheaper areas do not always mean lower quality. For example, some areas have a premium because they are close to good schools. It is worth researching carefully average house prices in different areas.

    7. Self Certification Mortgage.

    Advertising

    If you feel frustrated that banks won’t lend more than 3-4 times your income you might like to consider a self certification mortgage. Basically, a self certification mortgage enables you to state your likely income. In practise this can be a way to borrow more than under standard circumstances. Given the recent problems with sub prime mortgages it is advisable to be cautious when proceeding with this option. I mention it mainly because it is what I used to buy my first house, 3 years ago. Buying a house was a little more expensive than renting. But, self certificating was the only option to borrow enough capital. Do bear in mind, if you borrow a high income multiple (5 or 6 times income) you will struggle if interest rates rise significantly.

    Getting on the property ladder is not easy for our generation. It is likely you will have to make some sort of sacrifices. However, the alternative of renting is often even more unattractive. Which ever option you choose make sure you don’t go beyond your financial limitations.

    Tejvan Pettinger works as an Economics teacher in Oxford. He writes a blog about Mortgages and Finance. This Includes articles about the Housing Market, getting out of debt and paying off your mortgage early

    More by this author

    7 Secrets of Being Popular 7 Tips for Writing Exam Essays Does the Internet Really Increase your Productivity? How to Improve Your Concentration 10 Simple Tips for Using Email

    Trending in Featured

    1 Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny 2 How to Become an Expert (And Spot out One Nearby) 3 How to Find Your Passion and Live a Fulfilling Life 4 How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Goals 5 5 Key Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

    Advertising

    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

    Advertising

    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

    Advertising

    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

    Read Next