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5 ways to reclaim some of your attention.

5 ways to reclaim some of your attention.
Attention

    A few weeks ago after realizing here just how many hands were in my attention wallet, I put at the top of my GTD projects list a new project: Reclaiming my attention. I suspect it’s going to be one of those long projects – there are so many people, companies, causes, information sources and things out there, all wanting slices of your attention until you have nothing for yourself, your work or your future.

    In some ways it’s kind of like all those friendly sounding companies and services out there : “Just let us charge your credit card automatically our tiny little fee each month and you’ll be happier, sexier, taller and even more attractive! Just click here and forget all about it.”

    If road to the poorhouse is paved with automatic debits, the road to a living hell of knowing you can get things done but you’re not is paved with attention robbers.

    I’m still feeling my way here, so what follows are something of a grab bag of solutions and quick fixes for reclaiming your attention. Your mileage may vary.

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    Let Scoble do it. Robert Scoble is a really smart guy with a plan, a purpose, and the ability to churn through an ungodly amount of RSS feeds to find the stuff that’s going to matter re the Web, the software industry, and new tech stuff. So I’m going to let him do it for me and let the one feed he shares substitute for the 622 or whatever number he reads. (See 2nd graf of this post by Robert for details.) Robert, if you want $20 a year for this incredible attention reclaiming service you are providing, just let me know where to send the check – baby’s going to want new shoes! Anyone else have a Google Reader Shared Feed to share?

    Three for One. Here’s how it works:

    1. Make a mental list of the next 3 things you are going to do.
    2. Do nothing else but #1 until it’s done, you’ve pushed it as far as it can go right now, or someone screams in your ear the building is on fire. Concentrate on it. Turn off email, telephone, iTunes, IM, Skype, other programs, your browser and your cat if you can find an off pause switch and Just. Do. One. Thing. Until. You. Are. Done.
    3. Repeat for items 2 and 3. Then go back to step 1.

    The beauty of Three for One is you make a single decision – what the next three things you are going to do are – and then you do them. You make no more decisions, you tolerate no more distractions. You exert your will that you are going to do just these three things and (for the moment) to hell with everything else.

    Singletask. Okay, I brazenly stole the guts of this idea from this Lifehack.org post, but the fact remains that while multitasking may scale up so you can work on multiple projects over the course of a day, week or month, it sucks when you try to scale multitasking down to this hour, minute, or second. So all hail Singletasking – the long lost and newly found joy of just doing one thing at a time, well.

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    Break your agreements. Not all your agreements, just these two you’ve been suckered into:

    • If you check email often you’ll get something nice. Liar! Fraud! Thief! The more I check email, the more crap gets poured in my eyes, the more decisions I have to make about what is and is not crap, the more people expect me to do, the more alluring opportunities get dangled in front of me when I can’t deal with the opportunities I already have and the more my head hurts.I defy anyone to process email for two hours straight in the morning and get one damn thing worth doing done the rest of the day.

      Every single email you process is a decision you’ve wasted. You have a finite number of decisions you can make in a day before you’re brain turns to mush. Should you spend those decisions on your work, your life, your future? Or spend them like some hopeless loser sitting in front of a slot machine feeding it money at 2am in the morning? Your choice.

      I’ve decided to process email three times a day, never, ever before 9am and everything that isn’t from someone I know, something I expect or has a good subject line goes straight to the trash. The stuff that I don’t immediately trash will go into a folder called “@ End of Today” where at the end of the day I will actually process each email for reply, reference, waiting on or bump to @End of Week.

    • We’re notifications, and we’re here to help. Email notifications, network notifications, patch notifications, too-many icons on your desktop notifications, too little disk space notifications, and on and on and on. My PCs over the years have become the single biggest source of interruptions in my life. Everything from marketing ploys crossdressed as Important Notifications! (“Crap software has a new version, would you like to interrupt your pitiful workflow or actually use the software and maybe lose everything you work on?”) to Windows OneCare everything is fine, but we thought we’d interrupt you anyway notifications.A never ending stream of happy friendly balloons in the lower right hand corner of your screen, breaking your concentration. If my PC were a coworker sitting next to me, I would have long ago put a bullet through that sucker’s head because he won’t SHUT UP!

      This from Microsoft’s Vista User Experience Guide, the official word for programmers: “A notification informs users of events that are unrelated to the current user activity through a balloon briefly displayed from an icon in the notification area. The notification could result from a user action or significant system event, or could offer potentially useful information from Microsoft Windows or an application.

      The information in a notification is useful and relevant, but never critical. Consequently, notifications don’t require immediate user action and users can freely ignore them.” (emphasis in the original).

      Yeah, right.

      While I can turn off Security Center notifications, low disk space notifications, maybe all notifications (Warning – use these at your own risk!), I hope some enterprising developer comes up with an application that just takes all these damn notifications and logs them so I can at my leisure review them. If that microISV’s application applied some basic rules so I have to use even less attention on it, so much the better.

      Oh, and don’t you Mac/Linux people get too smug – I see there’s a Software Update on my new MacBook Pro that’s grabbed my attention once already and two programs have reported they really want to update themselves before I’ve even had a chance to use them. It’s a slippery slope there and you won’t enjoy the slide down here where the rest of us Windows users are.

    More on the battle to reclaim my attention and incidentally a productive life next week.

    Bob Walsh sells MasterList Professional, a Windows task management and writes, codes, podcasts and blogs about different aspects of the digital lifestyle at MyMicroISV and Clear Blogging. His second book, Clear Blogging, is now available at Amazon and elsewhere.

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    I want, I learn, I do, I get Getting Attention by doing a Good thing I want my attention back 5 ways to reclaim some of your attention. Surprise!

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    Last Updated on April 8, 2019

    22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

    22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

    Unless you’re infinitely rich or prepared to rack up major debt, you need to budget your income. Setting limits on how much you are willing to spend helps control expenses. But what about your time? Do you budget your time or spend it carelessly?

    Deadlines are the chronological equivalent of a budget. By setting aside a portion of time to complete a task, goal or project in advance you avoid over-spending. Deadlines can be helpful but they can also be a source of frustration if set improperly. Here are some tips for making deadlines work:

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    1. Use Parkinson’s Law – Parkinson’s Law states that tasks expand to fill the time given to them. By setting a strict deadline in advance you can cut off this expansion and focus on what is most important.
    2. Timebox – Set small deadlines of 60-90 minutes to work on a specific task. After the time is up you finish. This cuts procrastinating and forces you to use your time wisely.
    3. 80/20 – The Pareto Principle suggests that 80% of the value is contained in 20% of the input. Apply this rule to projects to focus on that critical 20% first and fill out the other 80% if you still have time.
    4. Project VS Deadline – The more flexible your project, the stricter your deadline. If a task has relatively little flexibility in completion a softer deadline will keep you sane. If the task can grow easily, keep a tight deadline to prevent waste.
    5. Break it Down – Any deadline over one day should be broken down into smaller units. Long deadlines fail to motivate if they aren’t applied to manageable units.
    6. Hofstadter’s Law – Basically this law states that it always takes longer than you think. A rule I’ve heard in software development is to double the time you think you need. Then add six months. Be patient and give yourself ample time for complex projects.
    7. Backwards Planning – Set the deadline first and then decide how you will achieve it. This approach is great when choices are abundant and projects could go on indefinitely.
    8. Prototype – If you are attempting something new, test out smaller versions of a project to help you decide on a final deadline. Write a 10 page e-book before your 300 page novel or try to increase your income by 10% before aiming to double it.
    9. Find the Weak Link – Figure out what could ruin your plans and accomplish it first. Knowing the unknown can help you format your deadlines.
    10. No Robot Deadlines – Robots can work without sleep, relaxation or distractions. You aren’t a robot. Don’t schedule your deadline with the expectation you can work sixteen hour days to complete it. Deathmarches aren’t healthy.
    11. Get Feedback – Get a realistic picture from people working with you. Giving impossible deadlines to contractors or employees will only build resentment.
    12. Continuous Planning – If you use a backwards planning model, you need to constantly be updating plans to fit your deadline. This means making cuts, additions or refinements so the project will fit into the expected timeframe.
    13. Mark Excess Baggage – Identify areas of a task or project that will be ignored if time grows short. What e-mails will you have to delete if it takes too long to empty your inbox? What features will your product lack if you need a rapid finish?
    14. Review – For deadlines over a month long take a weekly review to track your progress. This will help you identify methods you can use to speed up work and help you plan more efficiently for the future.
    15. Find Shortcuts – Almost any task or project has shortcuts you can use to save time. Is there a premade library you can use instead of building your own functions? An autoresponder to answer similar e-mails? An expert you can call to help solve a problem?
    16. Churn then Polish – Set a strict deadline for basic completion and then set a more comfortable deadline to enhance and polish afterwards. Often churning out the basics of a task quickly will require no more polishing afterwards than doing it slowly.
    17. Reminders – Post reminders of your deadlines everywhere. Creating a sense of urgency with your deadlines is necessary to keep them from getting pushed aside by distractions.
    18. Forward Planning – Not mutually exclusive with backwards planning, this involves planning the details of a project out before setting a deadline. Great for achieving clarity about what you are trying to accomplish before making arbitrary time limits.
    19. Set a Timer – Get one that beeps. Somehow the countdown of a timer appears more realistic for a ninety minute timebox than just glancing at your clock.
    20. Write them Down – Any deadline over a few hours needs to be written down. Otherwise it is an inclination not a goal. Having written deadlines makes them more tangible than internal decisions alone.
    21. Cheap/Fast/Good – Ben Casnocha in My Start Up Life mentions that you can have only have two of the three. Pick two of the cheap/fast/good dimensions before starting a project to help you prioritize.
    22. Be Patient – Using a deadline may seem to be the complete opposite of patience. But being patient with inflexible tasks is necessary to focus on their completion. The paradox is that the more patient you are, the more you can focus. The more you can focus the quicker the results will come!

    Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

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