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30 Ways to Make August Simply Successful

30 Ways to Make August Simply Successful
Sandals

The month of August is often like the last fifteen minutes of a good TV show- you know that it’s about to end but just hate to see it go. Please know that if you were to take action on all 30 of the following suggestions, the last thing your life would be is simplified. The key is to pair back, do less and live more. Pick two or three, do them well and see what happens.

  1. Wear sandals. They’re cheaper than regular shoes and you can save on not buying new socks. Whenever bear feet are present, relaxation follows.
  2. Clean out your wardrobe. Do you really need 14 pocket books? Are 5 pairs of dress shoes really necessary? Cleaning out old clothes is good for your closet and even better for your spiritual well-being.
  3. Throw something away. Few things clear the mind like tossing something into the trash. Go with your gut and do what feels right.
  4. De-Spam with pleasure. Nothing says “ah” like getting a spammer off your back. Report them, block them and clear your in-box of those that would make daily life a living hell.
  5. Walk it. If you can add some free exercise into your lifestyle, why not walk it? Choose a farther parking space, go for a stroll at lunch or just add a brisk 10 minute walk to your after-dinner ritual.
  6. Trade it in. Many people don’t know that you can trade in your old cell phone contract, not to mention your phone. You can also swap a car, clothing and old appliances. If it’s been bugging you, act on it today. A good resource is www.freecycle.org for donating a lightly-used product.
  7. Upgrade your gear. Rather than be “that guy” who is always upgrading without actually learning the finer points of a PDA, GPS or software package, be a connoisseur of fine gadgetry and upgrade when you are ready. The right tool at the right time can make all the difference.
  8. Visit the doctor. Why not start the new year with a check up? It feels great to hear someone tell you that you’re healthy and fit.
  9. Put on your boots. When was the last time that you took a long, half or full day hike in the woods? August is the perfect time to get out there and have nature take your breath away.
  10. Play with dirt. Dig something up, plant something new and get dirty. Whether it’s power washing something dirty or digging a ditch for better irrigation, there’s a magical element to getting dirty and then getting clean afterwards. Take all that your yard has to offer and get dirty.
  11. Donate lavishly. Why not end summer with a final charitable gift? You could write a fat check or better yet, you could donate a generous amount of your time or expertise. Be on the lookout for someone who needs a hand.
  12. Do a good deed and don’t look for credit. Whether it’s as small as leaving some change in the Dunkin Donuts tip-cup or mowing part of your neighbor’s lawn, good deeds build character and social currency.
  13. Plan out your year. If you could accomplish two or three things by March of next year, what would you do, starting in September, that would get you there? Is there a habit that you could perfect or a tendency that you can overcome?
  14. Go for a new look. If you’ve always wanted a perm or buzz cut but have been afraid to go for it, use August as your last window of opportunity. For guys, the only difference between a good haircut and a bad one is about three days.
  15. Take a long weekend. Instead of a high-priced trip to someplace expensive, go for a long weekend to the beach or at a B&B. Sometimes a short weekend trip is as beneficial as the extended stay somewhere more expensive.
  16. Take the “By Christmas” test. Take some time, when you can get alone and think. Then write down a short list of items that you’d like to accomplish by Christmas. There may be someone in your family that you want to reconnect with or an objective at work that you’d like to meet.
  17. Take out the trash. This is especially important for those in high-delegation positions. I learned years ago that a leader or executive who is comfortable taking out the trash is probably humble enough to be an effective leader. Don’t’ do it for others to see you- do it to build humility and character.
  18. Kill your subscriptions. What newsletters, magazines, papers can you eliminate this month? Since so much is available online, do you really need a hard copy of each of those subscriptions?
  19. Weed out your RSS reader. If you are currently subscribed to 30 or more blogs and are having a hard time keeping up, pair it back to less than ten. It’s ok- give yourself permission to do it today.
  20. Pray for five minutes every day. Nothing says priority like a person in prayer. Take the time to cultivate this important habit each day.
  21. Write an old-fashioned letter. With so much junk mail, a real letter stands out above the crowd. Who will you reconnect with this month?
  22. Retool your first and last hour of the day. These all-important hours set the tone and bring closure to the other 22 hours. Use them well and appreciate the difference it makes in your day.
  23. Clear your conscience. Is there something on your mind that you know needs attention? Often conscience is that internal GPS, telling us to avoid the bad stuff and cling to the good.
  24. Clean your air. Having air ducts cleaned out is a great way to ensure that your family’s air quality is up to par. You may be surprised at how much dust builds up over time in your house’s duct-work.
  25. Get GLOCAL. If you’ve ever wanted to do something for someone around the world but didn’t know how, adopt the “glocal” mindset: do something locally for someone globally. You might enlist one or two friends to put together a care package for a soldier in the Middle East or write letters to victims of a natural disaster.
  26. Organize your planner. Clear out the excess papers and receipts and streamline for the Fall months.
  27. Do some list hygiene. If you have duplicate email and snail mail addresses in your GMAIL or YAHOO organizers, spend five minutes a day clearing out the junk.
  28. Share your lists. Know someone who can benefit from one of your contacts? Go ahead and drop them a line with the person’s name or email, discussing how they might want to connect with one another.
  29. Hone your habits. Which one habit, if done well and every day, could really benefit your life in a dramatic way?
  30. Read LifeHack every day. Sorry, I just couldn’t resist!

Mike St. Pierre is the creator of The Daily Saint, a productivity blog focusing on work-life balance. www.thedailysaint.com

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Last Updated on November 5, 2019

How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive

How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive

Assuming the public school system didn’t crush your soul, learning is a great activity. It expands your viewpoint. It gives you new knowledge you can use to improve your life. It is important for your personal growth. Even if you discount the worldly benefits, the act of learning can be a source of enjoyment.

“I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” — Mark Twain

But in a busy world, it can often be hard to fit in time to learn anything that isn’t essential. The only things learned are those that need to be. Everything beyond that is considered frivolous. Even those who do appreciate the practice of lifelong learning, can find it difficult to make the effort.

Here are some tips for installing the habit of continuous learning:

1. Always Have a Book

It doesn’t matter if it takes you a year or a week to read a book. Always strive to have a book that you are reading through, and take it with you so you can read it when you have time.

Just by shaving off a few minutes in-between activities in my day I can read about a book per week. That’s at least fifty each year.

2. Keep a “To-Learn” List

We all have to-do lists. These are the tasks we need to accomplish. Try to also have a “to-learn” list. On it you can write ideas for new areas of study.

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Maybe you would like to take up a new language, learn a skill or read the collective works of Shakespeare. Whatever motivates you, write it down.

3. Get More Intellectual Friends

Start spending more time with people who think. Not just people who are smart, but people who actually invest much of their time in learning new skills. Their habits will rub off on you.

Even better, they will probably share some of their knowledge with you.

4. Guided Thinking

Albert Einstein once said,

“Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.”

Simply studying the wisdom of others isn’t enough, you have to think through ideas yourself. Spend time journaling, meditating or contemplating over ideas you have learned.

5. Put it Into Practice

Skill based learning is useless if it isn’t applied. Reading a book on C++ isn’t the same thing as writing a program. Studying painting isn’t the same as picking up a brush.

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If your knowledge can be applied, put it into practice.

In this information age, we’re all exposed to a lot of information, it’s important to re-learn how to learn so as to put the knowledge into practice.

6. Teach Others

You learn what you teach. If you have an outlet of communicating ideas to others, you are more likely to solidify that learning.

Start a blog, mentor someone or even discuss ideas with a friend.

7. Clean Your Input

Some forms of learning are easy to digest, but often lack substance.

I make a point of regularly cleaning out my feed reader for blogs I subscribe to. Great blogs can be a powerful source of new ideas. But every few months, I realize I’m collecting posts from blogs that I am simply skimming.

Every few months, purify your input to save time and focus on what counts.

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8. Learn in Groups

Lifelong learning doesn’t mean condemning yourself to a stack of dusty textbooks. Join organizations that teach skills.

Workshops and group learning events can make educating yourself a fun, social experience.

9. Unlearn Assumptions

You can’t add water to a full cup. I always try to maintain a distance away from any idea. Too many convictions simply mean too few paths for new ideas.

Actively seek out information that contradicts your worldview.

Our minds can’t be trusted, but this is what we can do about it to be wiser.

10. Find Jobs that Encourage Learning

Pick a career that encourages continual learning. If you are in a job that doesn’t have much intellectual freedom, consider switching to one that does.

Don’t spend forty hours of your week in a job that doesn’t challenge you.

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11. Start a Project

Set out to do something you don’t know how. Forced learning in this way can be fun and challenging.

If you don’t know anything about computers, try building one. If you consider yourself a horrible artist, try a painting.

12. Follow Your Intuition

Lifelong learning is like wandering through the wilderness. You can’t be sure what to expect and there isn’t always an end goal in mind.

Letting your intuition guide you can make self-education more enjoyable. Most of our lives have been broken down to completely logical decisions, that making choices on a whim has been stamped out.

13. The Morning Fifteen

Productive people always wake up early. Use the first fifteen minutes of your morning as a period for education.

If you find yourself too groggy, you might want to wait a short time. Just don’t put it off later in the day where urgent activities will push it out of the way.

14. Reap the Rewards

Learn information you can use. Understanding the basics of programming allows me to handle projects that other people would require outside help. Meeting a situation that makes use of your educational efforts can be a source of pride.

15. Make Learning a Priority

Few external forces are going to persuade you to learn. The desire has to come from within. Once you decide you want to make lifelong learning a habit, it is up to you to make it a priority in your life.

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Featured photo credit: Paul Schafer via unsplash.com

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