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28 Signs You’re Becoming a Productivity Junkie

28 Signs You’re Becoming a Productivity Junkie
Todo List

If you are a frequent visitor of Lifehack.org, then it is probably
safe to say that you thrive on productivity tips, lifehacks,
the latest tech tools, and all things GTD. However, how do
you know when you’ve crossed over to becoming a
productivity junkie? This article will point out some of
the warning signs to look for.

1. You have a shortcut created for every program on your
computer.

2. You try out a new productivity tool at least once a week.

3. LifeHack.org has become your second home.

4. You get excited about crossing off one of your to-dos.

5. You organize your desk at least once a day.

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6. You have your RSS feeds organized by priority and
filtered by keywords.

7. Your friends think you’re in a cult called GTD.

8. You’re training your kids to become future GTD masters.

9. You argue with your friends about which GTD system is the
best.

10. A few hours away from your PDA puts you into
withdrawals.

11. You’ve learned every Gmail hack in the book and you now
wear a t-shirt that proclaims your official title of Gmail
master.

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12. You have performed in-depth studies to find out when
your peak cycles of productivity occur throughout the day.

13. The timer has become your new best friend.

14. You know exactly which type of music puts you at the
highest level of productivity.

15. An empty inbox gives you a pleasant satisfaction
that you still can’t quite explain to your family.

16. You plan on naming all of your future kids after
productivity principles: Pareto, Zen, and of course, the
great GTD master himself, David Allen.

17. You have read “Getting Things Done” multiple times and
every page is covered with notes and references.

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18. Whenever a friend or family has a birthday, you give
them a productivity gift basket composed of a planner,
calendar, to-do lists, and your favorite productivity
books.

19. You’ve delegated all of your lower-level tasks to your
kids. They now run all of your errands while you work on
your most important to-dos.

20. You reminisce about the bygone days of procrastination.

21. You listen to educational audio books in the car to
insure that you don’t miss a minute of potential
productivity.

22. Your closet is organized by color and all of the most
worn clothing is placed in the most convenient and
reachable spots.

23. You have over clocked all of the toothbrushes in the
house. Your kids are thrilled with the idea but your wife
has now put all of her personal belongings under lock and
key.

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24. Friends and family are beginning to set up appointments
for allotted times in order to fit into your schedule.

25. On your next vacation, you are planning to take the
whole family to a GTD seminar.

26. You’ve started your own book club for all thing related
to productivity and GTD.

27. You’re now starting to wonder if your fascination with
productivity is actually making you less productive.

28. You’re thinking about joining a support group to
recover from this addiction.

Kim Roach is a productivity junkie who blogs regularly at
The Optimized Life. Read her articles on 50 Essential
GTD Resources
, How to Have a 46 Hour Day, Do You Need
a Braindump
, What They Don’t Teach You in School,
and Free Yourself From the Inbox.

More by this author

50 Ways to Increase Productivity and Achieve More in Less Time How to Live on a Tight Budget Top 10 Ways to Use del.icio.us Top 20 Free Applications to Increase Your Productivity 101 Steps to Becoming a Better Blogger

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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