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2006 LifeHack Review: Best 50 hacks for your Life

2006 LifeHack Review: Best 50 hacks for your Life
New Year!

    Do you want to be as productive as many of us, but missed a lot of actions at lifehack.org during the year? Other than subscribing our feed now, I give you a way to catch up with us before 2007 begins. I’ve selected the best 50 life hacks of the year, based on their popularity and contents in different categories. Invest your time – read them. Bookmark this page and mark reading them as one of your new year resolutions.

    Communication, Writing, Studying

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    1. My Best Presentation Tricks
    2. The Business Card Game
    3. Persuasive Writing for Students, Webmasters, Bloggers, and Everyone Else
    4. 7 tips of handling your Emails without feeling overwhelmed
    5. Writing as a Form of Self Healing
    6. Advice for students: Writing by hand
    7. Yes, But Do People Like You?
    8. Writing – Just do it!
    9. A good place to study
    10. Blog your way through Writer’s Block
    11. 14 Tips for Communicating Ideas

    Productivity, Creativity, Motivation

    1. 9 Top Secrets of Naturally Born Organizers
    2. Fight The Flab!
    3. More Fight The Flab!
    4. Limit Creativity, Get Innovation
    5. Precious Moments
    6. 5 Ways to Improve Your Productivity in the Office
    7. A Geek’s Best Lifehack
    8. What Kind of Paranoid Are You?
    9. Being A Creative
    10. There’s No Time!
    11. The Mysteries Behind Motivation and How To Manipulate Them
    12. Time Management: Handling Disruptions in Daily Schedules
    13. Productivity Hack: Write Mini Process Flows
    14. Design an Online Workflow

    Management, Self-Management, Entrepreneurship

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    1. Bare Bones Project Hacks
    2. The 10 Beliefs of Great Managers
    3. The Simplest Path to Success
    4. Letting Things Go
    5. Closet Entrepreneur
    6. Time To Discard The Portmanteau
    7. 5 Important Keys to Bootstrap Your Entrepreneurship
    8. The Most Underutilized Tool for Effective Communication
    9. Everyday Performance Reviews
    10. Meetings, @&!!$*@ Meetings!
    11. What Are You Worried About?
    12. How to Ruin Your Career In Five Easy Steps

    Procrastination, Goal Settings, Life

    1. 9 Steps to Define your Goal Destination and Devise a Plan to Get There
    2. Pro-Active Steps to Prevent Procrastination
    3. Improve Your Life By Following A Schedule
    4. The Causes of Procrastination And How To Conquer Them
    5. How To Make Resolutions You’ll Keep
    6. Literal Life Hack: Cut your window of time in half
    7. New Year’s Resolutions and Deficit Thinking
    8. 6 Sleep Tips
    9. Risks versus Rewards Worksheet
    10. 5 Tips for Getting Out of Debt (and Why)
    11. Deep Breathing: A Great Health Trick
    12. 8 Expenses to Cut and How
    13. Desk-side Fitness

    Are there any other posts that you enjoyed which haven’t mentioned here? Are there any lifehacks that you’ve learned in here during 2006? Comment them here!

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    In closing, by using the last post of 2006, I want to thank all our contributors and guest authors in 2006 to make lifehack.org a place where people can search for their personal development needs: Chris Brogan, Adrian Savage, Rosa Say, Tony Clark, Reg Adkins, Vishal Rao, Michael Leddy, Bruce DeBoer and many others. Happy new year, Lifehack.org readers! See you in 2007 with more tips and news.

    More 2006 Review: Metrics and Focus

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    Leon Ho

    Founder of Lifehack

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    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    No!

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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    But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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    But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

    1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
    2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
    3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
    4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
    5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
    6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
    7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
    8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
    9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
    10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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