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12 Steps Closer to Your Ideal Work Day

12 Steps Closer to Your Ideal Work Day
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What would an ideal workday look like? While there might not be a single answer across the board, all of us can relate to the fact that many of our workdays are not designed for optimal productivity. We complain about too many meetings, not enough pay, travel that saps your energy and did I mention the hours? Why not take some time today to consider what an ideal day at work might look like?

Start the afternoon before. A clean space makes for smooth work. To the degree that you can, neaten up your desk and put things in order for the next day. Do a quick “what do I need to work on tomorrow?” and write it down. This little step plants seeds of productivity that will spill over into the following day. Get home at a reasonable hour- your loved ones will thank you for it. I’ve found that my family likes my work more as a result of working less when I can. The competition between family and work shrinks when both are in balance.

Start the night before. This might seem obvious but so many people burn the candle at both ends. It makes sense to get to sleep at a reasonable hour in order to get in 6-8 quality hours of sleep. Some need more, few of us need less. Become a sleep expert and routine your bed time for optimal waking the next day. Another secret is to do a ‘media audit’ of your free hours prior to bed. If you find yourself zoning out via TV for no good reason, turn the tube off and read, work out or talk with friends.

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Practice early morning rituals. A strong start to the day is key for designing your ideal work experience. When you get up early, it’s as if you’ve already accomplished something. Throw in a coffee ritual (but not too much!) and you have another reason to get up. I’ll admit, I enjoy a good 7 minute snooze button as much as the next guy, but only to a degree. Put mind over mattress and get moving in the AM.

Crank when you can. When you’re at work, work. In the time-windows when you know you can really crank, get things done. This may involve closing your office door or telling your secretary that you need 30 minutes of uninterrupted time. My guess is that you can accomplish more in a half hour of dedicated work time than you could in 3-4 blocks of stop-and-go work.

Remember, interruptions happen, now what? Sure, we need to crank out our work but interruptions do happen. The key is to absorb them instead of bristle when they come up. You may have to coach those around you as to how you would like correspondence and when you are most free. Some people use door signs as subtle reminders of their work: green means come on in while red implies that work is going on. Find what works for you. I once heard of someone who hung a sign on his cubicle that said, “Power hour in progress. Enter at risk.”

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Take your breaks. A good stretch and walk around the block is good for the body and the mind. Step away from the computer, leave the Blackberry at your desk and just walk. Take five minutes and read a chapter from that book that you put in your briefcase. Breathe some fresh air. Get some water. It’s that simple.

Create real human interaction. While digital correspondence is at an all time high, our moments of genuine human interchange may be at risk. A simple rule? Whenever you can, interact. As long as you’re getting your work done, keep it human and stay on task. I think that they can go hand in hand- human interaction and getting things done.

Speed matters. As you’re going through your day, remember that speed matters. Move with purpose and swiftly act on things that are in front of you. Walk briskly and others will sense that you are a person of action. Their step will pick up too!

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Food is your friend. A few months back, I looked at the scale and realized that I had lost about 10 pounds without even trying. I saw that my eating habits had been spotty and my body wasn’t getting enough of what it needed in order to keep going. Take the time to prepare a decent set of 4-5 smaller meals instead of binging at the end of the day. Now I try to keep a supply of energy bars in my desk just in case.

Take note of the final hour. The final hour is key to an optimal work day. This is a good time to process any excess in your in-box, prepare things for the next day and clear your mind.

Remember what’s really important. Getting out the door at a reasonable time (and it probably differs for each of us) is good for you and for those you care about. When you arrive home from work, take 10 seconds to remind yourself that you’re now at home and need to be fully present for your spouse, kids, and whatever else requires your attention. It’s not easy making this transition but vital nonetheless.

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Begin again. The good and bad news of an ideal workday is that it requires mastery and repetition. Don’t be too hard on yourself if things only went 75% well today because tomorrow is coming. You’ll get another shot at success.

An ideal workday is something towards which we can work. In my field of education, I tell young teachers to aim for the “3 Day Rule”: strive to be on your game for 3 out of 5 days and you’ll start to turn the tide of how you work. Eventually your 3 days will turn into 4 and every once in a while, you’ll see a solid 5 days of productivity.

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Last Updated on January 2, 2019

7 Steps For Making a New Year’s Resolution and Keeping It

7 Steps For Making a New Year’s Resolution and Keeping It

Are you keen to reinvent yourself this year? Or at least use the new year as a long overdue excuse to get rid of bad habits or pick up new ones?

Yes, it’s that time of year again. The time of year when we feel as if we have to turn over a new leaf. The time when we misguidedly imagine that the arrival of a new year will magically provide the catalyst, motivation and persistence we need to reinvent ourselves.

Traditionally, New Year’s Day is styled as the ideal time to kick start a new phase in your life and the time when you must make your all important new year’s resolution. Unfortunately, the beginning of the year is also one of the worst times to make a major change in your habits because it’s often a relatively stressful time, right in the middle of the party and vacation season.

Don’t set yourself up for failure this year by vowing to make huge changes that will be hard to keep. Instead follow these seven steps for successfully making a new year’s resolution you can stick to for good.

1. Just pick one thing

If you want to change your life or your lifestyle don’t try to change the whole thing at once. It won’t work. Instead pick one area of your life to change to begin with.

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Make it something concrete so you know exactly what change you’re planning to make. If you’re successful with the first change you can go ahead and make another change after a month or so. By making small changes one after the other, you still have the chance to be a whole new you at the end of the year and it’s a much more realistic way of doing it.

Don’t pick a New Year’s resolution that’s bound to fail either, like running a marathon if you’re 40lbs overweight and get out of breath walking upstairs. If that’s the case resolve to walk every day. When you’ve got that habit down pat you can graduate to running in short bursts, constant running by March or April and a marathon at the end of the year. What’s the one habit you most want to change?

2. Plan ahead

To ensure success you need to research the change you’re making and plan ahead so you have the resources available when you need them. Here are a few things you should do to prepare and get all the systems in place ready to make your change.

Read up on it – Go to the library and get books on the subject. Whether it’s quitting smoking, taking up running or yoga or becoming vegan there are books to help you prepare for it. Or use the Internet. If you do enough research you should even be looking forward to making the change.

Plan for success – Get everything ready so things will run smoothly. If you’re taking up running make sure you have the trainers, clothes, hat, glasses, ipod loaded with energetic sounds at the ready. Then there can be no excuses.

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3. Anticipate problems

There will be problems so make a list of what they’ll be. If you think about it, you’ll be able to anticipate problems at certain times of the day, with specific people or in special situations. Once you’ve identified the times that will probably be hard work out ways to cope with them when they inevitably crop up.

4. Pick a start date

You don’t have to make these changes on New Year’s Day. That’s the conventional wisdom, but if you truly want to make changes then pick a day when you know you’ll be well-rested, enthusiastic and surrounded by positive people. I’ll be waiting until my kids go back to school in February.

Sometimes picking a date doesn’t work. It’s better to wait until your whole mind and body are fully ready to take on the challenge. You’ll know when it is when the time comes.

5. Go for it

On the big day go for it 100%. Make a commitment and write it down on a card. You just need one short phrase you can carry in your wallet. Or keep it in your car, by your bed and on your bathroom mirror too for an extra dose of positive reinforcement.

Your commitment card will say something like:

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  • I enjoy a clean, smoke-free life.
  • I stay calm and in control even under times of stress.
  • I’m committed to learning how to run my own business.
  • I meditate daily.

6. Accept failure

If you do fail and sneak a cigarette, miss a walk or shout at the kids one morning don’t hate yourself for it. Make a note of the triggers that caused this set back and vow to learn a lesson from them.

If you know that alcohol makes you crave cigarettes and oversleep the next day cut back on it. If you know the morning rush before school makes you shout then get up earlier or prepare things the night before to make it easier on you.

Perseverance is the key to success. Try again, keep trying and you will succeed.

7. Plan rewards

Small rewards are great encouragement to keep you going during the hardest first days. After that you can probably reward yourself once a week with a magazine, a long-distance call to a supportive friend, a siesta, a trip to the movies or whatever makes you tick.

Later you can change the rewards to monthly and then at the end of the year you can pick an anniversary reward. Something that you’ll look forward to. You deserve it and you’ll have earned it.

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Whatever your plans and goals are for this year, I’d do wish you luck with them but remember, it’s your life and you make your own luck.

Decide what you want to do this year, plan how to get it and go for it. I’ll definitely be cheering you on.

Are you planning to make a New Year’s resolution? What is it and is it something you’ve tried to do before or something new?

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