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12 Steps Closer to Your Ideal Work Day

12 Steps Closer to Your Ideal Work Day
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What would an ideal workday look like? While there might not be a single answer across the board, all of us can relate to the fact that many of our workdays are not designed for optimal productivity. We complain about too many meetings, not enough pay, travel that saps your energy and did I mention the hours? Why not take some time today to consider what an ideal day at work might look like?

Start the afternoon before. A clean space makes for smooth work. To the degree that you can, neaten up your desk and put things in order for the next day. Do a quick “what do I need to work on tomorrow?” and write it down. This little step plants seeds of productivity that will spill over into the following day. Get home at a reasonable hour- your loved ones will thank you for it. I’ve found that my family likes my work more as a result of working less when I can. The competition between family and work shrinks when both are in balance.

Start the night before. This might seem obvious but so many people burn the candle at both ends. It makes sense to get to sleep at a reasonable hour in order to get in 6-8 quality hours of sleep. Some need more, few of us need less. Become a sleep expert and routine your bed time for optimal waking the next day. Another secret is to do a ‘media audit’ of your free hours prior to bed. If you find yourself zoning out via TV for no good reason, turn the tube off and read, work out or talk with friends.

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Practice early morning rituals. A strong start to the day is key for designing your ideal work experience. When you get up early, it’s as if you’ve already accomplished something. Throw in a coffee ritual (but not too much!) and you have another reason to get up. I’ll admit, I enjoy a good 7 minute snooze button as much as the next guy, but only to a degree. Put mind over mattress and get moving in the AM.

Crank when you can. When you’re at work, work. In the time-windows when you know you can really crank, get things done. This may involve closing your office door or telling your secretary that you need 30 minutes of uninterrupted time. My guess is that you can accomplish more in a half hour of dedicated work time than you could in 3-4 blocks of stop-and-go work.

Remember, interruptions happen, now what? Sure, we need to crank out our work but interruptions do happen. The key is to absorb them instead of bristle when they come up. You may have to coach those around you as to how you would like correspondence and when you are most free. Some people use door signs as subtle reminders of their work: green means come on in while red implies that work is going on. Find what works for you. I once heard of someone who hung a sign on his cubicle that said, “Power hour in progress. Enter at risk.”

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Take your breaks. A good stretch and walk around the block is good for the body and the mind. Step away from the computer, leave the Blackberry at your desk and just walk. Take five minutes and read a chapter from that book that you put in your briefcase. Breathe some fresh air. Get some water. It’s that simple.

Create real human interaction. While digital correspondence is at an all time high, our moments of genuine human interchange may be at risk. A simple rule? Whenever you can, interact. As long as you’re getting your work done, keep it human and stay on task. I think that they can go hand in hand- human interaction and getting things done.

Speed matters. As you’re going through your day, remember that speed matters. Move with purpose and swiftly act on things that are in front of you. Walk briskly and others will sense that you are a person of action. Their step will pick up too!

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Food is your friend. A few months back, I looked at the scale and realized that I had lost about 10 pounds without even trying. I saw that my eating habits had been spotty and my body wasn’t getting enough of what it needed in order to keep going. Take the time to prepare a decent set of 4-5 smaller meals instead of binging at the end of the day. Now I try to keep a supply of energy bars in my desk just in case.

Take note of the final hour. The final hour is key to an optimal work day. This is a good time to process any excess in your in-box, prepare things for the next day and clear your mind.

Remember what’s really important. Getting out the door at a reasonable time (and it probably differs for each of us) is good for you and for those you care about. When you arrive home from work, take 10 seconds to remind yourself that you’re now at home and need to be fully present for your spouse, kids, and whatever else requires your attention. It’s not easy making this transition but vital nonetheless.

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Begin again. The good and bad news of an ideal workday is that it requires mastery and repetition. Don’t be too hard on yourself if things only went 75% well today because tomorrow is coming. You’ll get another shot at success.

An ideal workday is something towards which we can work. In my field of education, I tell young teachers to aim for the “3 Day Rule”: strive to be on your game for 3 out of 5 days and you’ll start to turn the tide of how you work. Eventually your 3 days will turn into 4 and every once in a while, you’ll see a solid 5 days of productivity.

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Last Updated on November 18, 2020

15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)

15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)
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It’s okay, you can finally admit it. It’s been two months since you’ve seen the inside of the gym. Getting sick, family crisis, overtime at work and school papers that needed to get finished all kept you for exercising. Now, the question is: how do you start again?
Once you have an exercise habit, it becomes automatic. You just go to the gym, there is no force involved. But after a month, two months or possibly a year off, it can be hard to get started again. Here are some tips to climb back on that treadmill after you’ve fallen off.

  1. Don’t Break the Habit – The easiest way to keep things going is simply not to stop. Avoid long breaks in exercising or rebuilding the habit will take some effort. This may be advice a little too late for some people. But if you have an exercise habit going, don’t drop it at the first sign of trouble.
  2. Reward Showing Up – Woody Allen once said that, “Half of life is showing up.” I’d argue that 90% of making a habit is just making the effort to get there. You can worry about your weight, amount of laps you run or the amount you can bench press later.
  3. Commit for Thirty Days – Make a commitment to go every day (even just for 20 minutes) for one month. This will solidify the exercise habit. By making a commitment you also take pressure off yourself in the first weeks back of deciding whether to go.
  4. Make it Fun – If you don’t enjoy yourself at the gym, it is going to be hard to keep it a habit. There are thousands of ways you can move your body and exercise, so don’t give up if you’ve decided lifting weights or doing crunches isn’t for you. Many large fitness centers will offer a range of programs that can suit your tastes.
  5. Schedule During Quiet Hours – Don’t put exercise time in a place where it will easily be pushed aside by something more important. Right after work or first thing in the morning are often good places to put it. Lunch-hour workouts might be too easy to skip if work demands start mounting.
  6. Get a Buddy – Grab a friend to join you. Having a social aspect to exercising can boost your commitment to the exercise habit.
  7. X Your Calendar – One person I know has the habit of drawing a red “X” through any day on the calendar he goes to the gym. The benefit of this is it quickly shows how long it has been since you’ve gone to the gym. Keeping a steady amount of X’s on your calendar is an easy way to motivate yourself.
  8. Enjoyment Before Effort – After you finish any work out, ask yourself what parts you enjoyed and what parts you did not. As a rule, the enjoyable aspects of your workout will get done and the rest will be avoided. By focusing on how you can make workouts more enjoyable, you can make sure you want to keep going to the gym.
  9. Create a Ritual – Your workout routine should become so ingrained that it becomes a ritual. This means that the time of day, place or cue automatically starts you towards grabbing your bag and heading out. If your workout times are completely random, it will be harder to benefit from the momentum of a ritual.
  10. Stress Relief – What do you do when your stressed? Chances are it isn’t running. But exercise can be a great way to relieve stress, releasing endorphin which will improve your mood. The next time you feel stressed or tired, try doing an exercise you enjoy. When stress relief is linked to exercise, it is easy to regain the habit even after a leave of absence.
  11. Measure Fitness – Weight isn’t always the best number to track. Increase in muscle can offset decreases in fat so the scale doesn’t change even if your body is. But fitness improvements are a great way to stay motivated. Recording simple numbers such as the number of push-ups, sit-ups or speed you can run can help you see that the exercise is making you stronger and faster.
  12. Habits First, Equipment Later – Fancy equipment doesn’t create a habit for exercise. Despite this, some people still believe that buying a thousand dollar machine will make up for their inactivity. It won’t. Start building the exercise habit first, only afterwards should you worry about having a personal gym.
  13. Isolate Your Weakness – If falling off the exercise wagon is a common occurrence for you, find out why. Do you not enjoy exercising? Is it a lack of time? Is it feeling self-conscious at the gym? Is it a lack of fitness know-how? As soon as you can isolate your weakness, you can make steps to improve the situation.
  14. Start Small – Trying to run fifteen miles your first workout isn’t a good way to build a habit. Work below your capacity for the first few weeks to build the habit. Otherwise you might scare yourself off after a brutal workout.
  15. Go for Yourself, Not to Impress – Going to the gym with the only goal of looking great is like starting a business with only the goal to make money. The effort can’t justify the results. But if you go to the gym to push yourself, gain energy and have a good time, then you can keep going even when results are slow.

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