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12 Hours to Better Time Management

12 Hours to Better Time Management
12 Hours to Better Time Management

Work. Kids. School. Sports. Second job. Partner’s job. The next great American novel. Your knitting circle. Remodeling the guest bathroom. Taking your car in for its 30,000 mile tune-up. An on and on and on — it seems like we have things to do in abundance. What we don’t ever seem to have enough of is time.

I think we all know what we should do, but the prospect of sitting down and getting everything together, taking the time to set up a system that we trust to work for us (and that we trust ourselves to make work) is daunting. And, what’s more, it’s time consuming — and time’s exactly what we don’t have.

We’re too busy to manage our time!

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But, what if you could do it in 12 hours? Maybe not even all at once — a couple hours a day over the course of a week, maybe, or even a half-hour a day over course of a few weeks? That seems a lot more doable, doesn’t it? Like something you might be able to get yourself to do?

Here, then, is the backbone of a good system you can implement in 12 hours (or less). Give yourself a week or three to get it up and running, and see if the time you invest in it now isn’t returned to you several times over down the line.

1. Set up your calendars (4-6 hours)

Use an online calendar like Google Calendar or 30 Boxes to set reminders for every conceivable event in your life, particularly recurring events like bill payment dates, your kids’ soccer games, and your shopping trips. I recommend a calendar rather than a reminder service like Sandy because you are going to want to look at your upcoming events once in a while, and a calendar is a format we’re all familiar with.

I recommend you put these into a calendar other than your main calendar. If you like the idea of looking at everything in, say, Outlook, most of the online calendars offer a iCal feed that you can subscribe to in Outlook. Call it “Reminders” and open it as a second calendar. If you put the al into your main calendar, you may find that it becomes too cluttered to be of any use — especially in the month view where most calendars only show the first few items per day.

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Put all of these events into your calendar:

  • Gas bill due date
  • Electric bill due date
  • Mortgage/rent due date
  • Phone bill due dates (landline and mobile)
  • Cable/satellite bill due date
  • Insurance premium due dates
  • Backup computer (daily, weekly, or monthly, depending on your usage and level of paranoia — automate this if you can)
  • Trash pickup (set reminder for the night before)
  • One day every three months for oil changes
  • One day every year for auto tune-ups
  • One day every three years for major auto tune-ups
  • One day every 6 months for dentist appointments
  • One day every year for doctor, eye doctor
  • Any other recurring medical appointments
  • One day very month for prescription refilling (two reminders — one to call in refill, one to pick up)
  • Netflix/Tivo/XM/other service billing dates
  • Write grocery list (one day before your regular shopping day)
  • The day the exterminator comes
  • The time and day of any TV show you watch regularly
  • The last day of January (to check for tax paperwork)
  • One or more days at the beginning of the year to do your taxes and.or contact your tax preparer
  • April 15 (or whatever day taxes are due in your country)
  • Start and end of the school year, start and end of school vacations
  • Birthdays, Anniversaries, Christmas, Valentine’s Day, other important holidays (set two reminders — one on the day itself to remind you to call or take some other action and one two weeks earlier to buy a gift, if needed, or plan a party)
  • Monthly, quarterly, and annual home maintenance (see checklists below)
  • Any other date which requires a concrete action at specific times every week, month, or year

Also add these dates, without reminders:

  • The end date for all of the above billing cycles
  • The pay dates for any automatic payments (and it’s a good idea, while you’re at it, to set up automatic payments for as many bills as you can)
  • Direct deposit dates
  • Automatic bank transfer dates
  • Stock dividend payment/reinvestment dates
  • Any other date it’s important for you to know about but which does not require any immediate action on your part

In your main calendar, the one you use for keeping track of your schedule day to day, schedule blocks of time for the following:

  • Grocery shopping (weekly)
  • Laundry (weekly)
  • Family meals
  • Bill paying (bi-monthly — the first and third weekend of the month might be good. List in the note section all of the bills that come due in the half month after each bill-paying day)
  • Any weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly meeting
  • Kids’ sports events (e.g. weekly football games every Saturday from September 15 through December 15)
  • Other kids’ activities (art classes, piano lessons, every 3rd weekend at grandparents’, etc.)
  • Weekend chores/cleaning
  • Commute time
  • Gym sessions
  • Golf/bicycling/other sports
  • Weekly review (schedule 2 hours whenever you’re least likely to be interrupted) — make sure you use your weekly review to add any new reminders you might need!
  • Writing time (if you want to write an hour a day, schedule an hour a day — don’t assume you’ll just “find” a spare hour each day.)
  • Other hobbies (same as with writing)
  • Any classes you’re taking
  • Goofing off time (I schedule at least an hour a day for whatever strikes my fancy)
  • Any other regular blocks of time you know you need to be at a specific place or doing a specific thing. The only exception is your regular 9-to-5 job, if you have one — schedule the activities you’ll do at your job, not the job itself.

You’ll have to use your own judgment about which of these scheduled events needs reminders and which don’t. I don’t set reminders for commuting time, for example, since it’s enough for me to be able to look at my calendar and see that those times are blocked off. On the other hand, I have reminders 15 minutes before all the classes I teach, so I know when I need to start heading to my classrooms when I’m on campus.

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2. Set up password system (2-3 hours)

Use a program like KeePass, or a password protected spreadsheet, or whatever system you feel most comfortable with, but use one — if you have a lot of passwords and no system, you’ll waste a lot of time either trying every possible password you can remember or searching frantically though your emails, files, or scraps of paper on your desk for wherever you recorded your password. In one or two sessions, record every login and password you have. Make sure you get information for all of these:

  • Bank accounts (including debit card PIN)
  • Credit cards
  • Stock accounts
  • Email
  • Internet service
  • Online payment services
  • Phone service
  • Utilities
  • Website memberships (Yahoo, Google, YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, flickr, WordPress.com, Digg, Reddit, Blogger, OpenID, etc.)
  • Your site’s login, FTP, and admin panel info
  • Any MySQL or other databases your site uses
  • Work accounts
  • Parking permit services
  • DMV online/other government services
  • Web applications
  • Software registration keys (not technically passwords, but many password managers include sections for registration keys — useful if [when] you need to reinstall Windows)
  • Any other account you have a password to

3. Create checklists (2-3 hours)

Make a new folder on your computer called “AAAAA Checklists” (or “@Checklists” for you David Allen fans), so it sorts to the top of your Documents folder.  Create a set of checklists for recurring tasks and save them to at folder, so you can easily print them off whenever you need one. Some checklists to think about creating include:

  • Grocery list (with everything you commonly buy and space for additions; my list is organized by aisle in the store we shop at, so I can move quickly from back to front with minimal interruptions)
  • Monthly home maintenance (e.g. change air filters, test smoke detectors, etc.)
  • Quarterly of semi-annual home maintenance (e.g. clean gutters, replace smoke detector batteries, check fire extinguishers, etc.)
  • Winter/Summer car preparation (e.g. check coolant, flush radiator, add chains/snow tires, etc.)
  • Trip/vacation packing
  • Christmas decorating

4. Keep up to date with a weekly review

You scheduled a weekly review in part 1 — make sure you keep that appointment. During your weekly review, take 10 minutes to set up reminders for any recurring events you might have missed in your initial setup, as well as any new commitments you’ve taken on. Check your schedule and make sure that you’ve left adequate time for any new tasks that you need to take care of in the coming week If necessary, move some of those blocks of scheduled time around. Check, too, what’s coming up that you’ll need to add to your schedule — for example, if your child’s birthday is coming up, you’ll need to schedule a block of time to pick up a gift, and another block of time to plan a party, etc.

Better, not perfect

There’s plenty of room for improvement, of course. This is meant as a backbone to a system; you will find that other ways to make yourself more efficient occur to you. Password management, for example, is just one kind of reference system that will save you time on a pretty regular basis — you will probably think of others that fit your own particular situation. In my home, keeping the mail sorted and in some semblance of order is a big task, so I set up a mail management center, with trays for my partner’s and my personal mail, a tray for bills, and a tray for coupons and flyers (it took about 30 minutes, in case you want to add that to your 12-hour commitment). You might not have a problem with mail, but you might need to work on keeping track of magazines.

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Having a solid structure in place will help you wrangle with the other, smaller “time sinks” in your life. Once you start looking at your time in a “big picture” view, you’ll start seeing everything that falls outside of your existing system in a new way, and solutions will suggest themselves. Instead of fretting about it, just schedule an hour or two to take care of it — for bigger projects break it into three or four 2-hour sections.

Once you’ve started getting a grip on your schedule, you’ll find that not only are you more on top of your schedule (instead of it being on top of you!) but your mind will be more at ease. Instead of worrying about what’s coming up, or even what you should be doing right now, you’ll just check your schedule and know. The energy you used to use for worrying and occasionally freaking out, you can put to better use pursuing your dreams.

What about you? What 1-2 hour activities do you recommend to help get a grip on time?

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

Why We Procrastinate After All?

We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

Is Procrastination Bad?

Yes it is.

Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

How Bad Procrastination Can Be

Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article: 8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

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Procrastination, a Technical Failure

Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

Learn more about how to fix your procrastination problem here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

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