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Winning Customers. . . and Keeping Them Too

Winning Customers. . . and Keeping Them Too

It’s widely accepted that customer service is probably the most important way for any business to differentiate itself in what is now a global, commoditized and hyper-competitive business world. When competitors can replicate your products or services, and undercut your pricing, about the only thing they cannot do as quickly is to reproduce the image you have already established in your customers’ minds and the loyalty it wins for you.

It’s also worth reminding yourself that in a world full of social networks, blogs, and web sites reviewing everything, providing poor customer service will be the fastest way for any business to do irreparable damage to its image, and convince people that they don’t want even to consider becoming its customers. Winning a new customer is important—but it’s also chancy, expensive and time consuming. Keeping the ones you have is essential to building any kind of stable business.

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So far so good, but saying this is a lot easier than doing it. What does it take to be able to prosper in a marketplace where a single misstep in handling a customer can be all around the Web in seconds?

It takes time. Time is essential to any type of satisfactory customer service.

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  • You must give people your time to deal with their issues properly, not palm off some quick fix that works (maybe) for you, but leaves them little better off.
  • You need to give your customers your time and attention to really listen to their concerns and thoughts. Just about every human being wants to be heard and have his or her existence validated by other people’s attention. Give customers this and they will love you (and forgive your mistakes too). Deny them a hearing and they’ll hate you for it, almost whatever else you do for them.
  • You must give people your time if you want to build a relationship with them that they will value. The difference between a relationship conducted on the run and a relationship that will create loyalty and long-term business is comparable to the difference between a long-term, loving relationship and a one-night stand.

How do you make the time for good customer service? The secret of making time for what matters is not in what you do, it’s in what you don’t do. Cut out all the time wasters: things like wading through pointless e-mails, jumping to respond to instant messages, attending meetings that have no real purpose, spreading gossip, and writing memos or sending messages purely to protect your butt. Pare down every purely administrative activity (record keeping, budgeting, filling in forms, discussing yet another policy on car parking allocations) to the minimum time needed.

Focus every second you can on whatever makes your business successful and nothing else. I can tell you right now that it won’t be compiling reports, or attending budget meetings, or playing office politics, or reading endless cc’d e-mails. If you want to tell someone something, pick up the phone or tell them face to face. If you want something done, don’t convene a committee; give someone the responsibility and trust them to do it. If you want time for better customer contact, stop wasting it on purely internal issues.

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Above all, concentrate on creating meaning for yourself, your customers, and your colleagues and associates. When people are doing something that has a meaning and purpose they can believe in, miracles happen every day.

What does it take to create such meaning? You guessed it: time. Time to spend with the people who work with you and the people you sell to or serve; time to explain your purpose and engage them in the process of making it a reality. If you fail in this, it won’t matter how else you spend your time. It will truly be wasted.

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Adrian Savage is a writer, an Englishman and a retired business executive (in that order). He lives in Tucson, Arizona. You can read his thoughts most days at Slow Leadership, the site for everyone who wants to bring back the taste, zest and satisfaction to leadership; and also at The Coyote Within.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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