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When and How to Turn Down a Job – Even in a Down Economy

When and How to Turn Down a Job – Even in a Down Economy

    I turn down jobs on a fairly regular basis.

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    I’ve been successfully self-employed for the past four years so I’m used to being my own boss, working on my own terms and being able to control – to a certain extent – the amount of money I bring in. So I have an extremely low tolerance when it comes to the type of work environments people want me to commit to. There are perfectly wise, legitimate reasons for turning down a job, even in a tough economy. Sometimes any job is not better than no job!

    What are your priorities?

    Before you even go on an interview, define what’s important to you in terms of the lifestyle you want to lead professionally and personally. For example, I’ve decided that working from home is extremely important to maintain the work/life balance I’m accustomed to. If a potential employer shows an unwillingness to compromise at all on this issue and wants me in the office at all times, that’s a red flag. I know many people who prefer going into an office – and I absolutely would, too, under the right (ie, flexible) circumstances – so this may not be an issue for you. But each person has their non- or slightly- negotiables. Figuring these out before you’re faced with making a decision about employment is imperative.

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    What are your – and your potential employer’s – salary expectations?

    This sounds simple but if you’ve ever made it through a round of interviews without any talk of money or salary, you know that things can quickly get complicated. It’s a waste of time for you and a potential employer to get all the way through a series of interviews only to find out you’re not on the same page financially. Even figuring out the range in which the potential employer is operating can be helpful in determining if you want to move forward.

    Again, don’t automatically assume that any job is better than no job. For example, I was recently recruited to interview for a position which payed three or four times LESS than what I make on my own! Yes, there’s the potential security of working for someone else (but even that can be a false sense of security!). But the reality was I would’ve had to maintain an intense client work load in addition to the job in order to bring in as much money as I wanted. This goes back to my point about priorities: That sacrifice of lifestyle (ie, working all the time!) just wasn’t worth it.

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    What are your Goals?

    Maybe you know exactly where you want to be in your career. Maybe you’re just testing the waters and you’re not sure. These two situations can lead to very different decisions about what types of jobs to take or turn down. If you have a specific goal in mind and you’re offered a job that doesn’t really follow the trajectory of that goal you’ll have to decide what the best response is – the job may not be a good fit because it would get you off-track of your long-term goal. Or it may be that the future employer would be flexible in allowing you to integrate different tasks and duties into your daily responsibilities to make it closer in line with your goals.

    If you’re not sure in what direction you’d like to head, accepting or rejecting a job can be less about long term goals and more about some of the other things mentioned above – lifestyle, work/life balance, salary, enjoyment and so forth. Even if you’re unemployed, it’s not always wise to take the first job that comes your way if you have specific standards and goals in mind.

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    Last Updated on January 21, 2020

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

    Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

    So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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    1. Listen

    Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

    2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

    Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

    “Why do you want to do that?”

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    “What makes you so excited about it?”

    “How long has that been your dream?”

    You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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    3. Encourage

    This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

    4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

    After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

    5. Dream

    This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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    6. Ask How You Can Help

    Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

    7. Follow Up

    Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

    Final Thoughts

    By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

    Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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    Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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