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Use Marketing Techniques to Land Your Next Job

Use Marketing Techniques to Land Your Next Job

    Do these lines from job applications sound familiar to you?

    “I want to develop my skills in interpersonal communication…”

    “My objective is to gain experience in the industry…”

    “I have a strong work ethic and I enjoy teamwork…”

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    This is how the typical applicant goes about presenting themselves to prospective employers, both in their letters and during the interview – if they get that far. Most applicants make the mistake of thinking that it’s all about them, and career advisers and how-to articles around the world reinforce this point of view.

    Getting a job is really a marketing challenge; you have to reach and sell to your target audience. It’s not about you at all – it’s all about how you can help the prospective employer to achieve their goals. They don’t care what your objectives are and what skills you want to develop, and they know talk about your work ethic and love for teamwork is pretty much obligatory – and if you’re a lazy worker who hates teamwork, they know you’re not going to come out and say it.

    So how do you land your next job while all your competitors for the position are sending in autobiographies?

    1. Research your target market

    The most important step in any marketing process is research, and the most important research is conducted finding out about your target market. In this stage, discover everything you can about your potential employer; information about the company, information about the director or the people in the department most likely to interview you, information about the location, information about their clients. Anything you can find can and will help you, and the deeper you go the better – you can almost guarantee that none of the other applicants will have this advantage.

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    Call clients, search media archives, use the internet, even just a read through of the company’s website is better than going in blind. Knowing the names and ages of your interviewer’s children is probably getting pretty close to stalking, though, unless they advertise it on the web for some reason – know where to draw the line.

    There are two things you want to get from this process. The secondary goal is to gain incidental knowledge that’ll enable you to quickly develop rapport with individuals you’ll be talking to, thanks to your attention to detail. Details that nobody else is mentioning. In any competitive environment, standing out as unique (for good reasons) is a huge benefit – yet everyone insists on doing the same old thing.

    The primary goal, though, is to find out what these guys want. As a business, their imperative is to make more money, but the research allows you to find supporting motives to include in your pitch and reinforce it.

    2. Form a pitch that sells them the benefits

    Take your research and write a letter that, instead of focusing on what you want and how many courses you’ve done, sells yourself as the perfect fit for what they need – how you can make them more money or achieve other goals. In marketing this is frequently called benefits over features, which essentially means that when you explain how something can benefit someone’s life instead of simply listing the things it can do, you will be able to sell it much more easily. The latter provides the potential customer with an idea of what the product is; the former has the customer imagining how great it would be to have the product and plants the seeds of desire.

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    The company is looking for a user interface designer for their e-commerce site. Their main reason for doing this is because conversions are low and they need to make more sales. Instead of telling them this:

    Since finishing my training in web design at XYZ University, I have designed online user interfaces for many clients across the globe. I believe I’m a perfect fit for your needs.

    You might say:

    I have consistently been able to design e-commerce user interfaces that have resulted in a higher conversion rate than previous iterations in all cases and online shops using my designs have conversion rates over 5% higher than the industry average.

    While the example text itself isn’t very polished, the difference in viewpoints is clear: don’t tell them what you’ve done, but what you’re going to do for them.

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    3. Build a Relationship with the Client

    In this case, your potential employer is the client. In the first marketing class I took at university, after the lecturer had finished introducing himself and giving the obligatory life story, he said: Marketing can be defined as building a relationship with your customer.

    While I don’t think the man did much with his own advice, that definition has always stuck with me partly because it explained many of my own past, seemingly accidental successes up to that point, and partly because it allowed me to achieve new ones. The single best way to achieve what you need or want to achieve is to build a relationship with someone who can assist you.

    This is where some of that research you did – without stalking – can come in handy, but facts aside, you need to be genuine and honest and make an effort to communicate not as interviewee to interviewer, but human to human. It’s the human connections that make the biggest difference.

    You might not get every single job you ever apply to just by using this strategy. One thing I can tell you is that you’ll be having far more applications resulting in interviews and interviews resulting in new jobs than before – start measuring your conversion rate!

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    Joel Falconer

    Editor, content marketer, product manager and writer with 12+ years of experience in the startup, design and tech digital media industries.

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    Last Updated on January 21, 2020

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

    Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

    So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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    1. Listen

    Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

    2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

    Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

    “Why do you want to do that?”

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    “What makes you so excited about it?”

    “How long has that been your dream?”

    You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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    3. Encourage

    This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

    4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

    After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

    5. Dream

    This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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    6. Ask How You Can Help

    Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

    7. Follow Up

    Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

    Final Thoughts

    By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

    Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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