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Use Happy Email Signatures

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Use Happy Email Signatures
Use Happy Email Signatures

The Chief Happiness Officer Alexander Kjerulf is suggesting today that using a more positive email signature, or more accurately something that closely represents what kind of person you are, is a nice touch.

More than that, it could change the way someone reads your emails and even goes about the rest of the day. Think of it as an email smile: it’s positive and contagious and can help someone else feel better about their day.

Currently, my email signature is quite boring. For work-related contacts I’m not familiar with I would use ‘Regards’ and when this relationship progresses, something more like ‘Cheers’. However, something a little more motivational like Mike Wagner’s ‘Keep creating’ is a fantastic step.

It’s a very simple gesture, but can go a long way. How do the Lifehack readers end emails? Are you considering altering it to something even more positive?

Monday Tip: Make a happy email signature – [PositiveSharing]

More by this author

Craig Childs

Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

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