Advertising
Advertising

Top 5 Tools for Impressive (and Easy) Vlogging

Top 5 Tools for Impressive (and Easy) Vlogging


    Video blogging (also known as “vlogging”) can be an overwhelming idea for those who’ve never tried it before. The excuses are endless.

    I hate being on camera.”

    “I don’t know how to edit.”

    “I don’t own any equipment.”

    “I don’t have anything interesting to say.”

    Regardless of what your excuse is, video is one of the most attention-grabbing mediums of online content creation. If you want to better the chances of catching the eye of your audience, you’re going to need to get visual. Plus, it’s really not that hard (said the girl who makes 4-8 videos per week).

    Here are my top 5 tools that help me create impressive vlogs without a whole lot of work.

    1. Screencast-O-Matic

    The beauty of this product is that you can make your first vlog without even owning a camera. Screencast-O-Matic is a program that records the activity of your computer screen with just a couple clicks and no software to download. This is a perfect alternative for a “how-to” post because instead of reading instructions, your audience can just watch and learn. I also really love to use this tool for recording Skype interviews which are also a super easy way to create content while still giving your audience a great experience.

    Advertising

    2. YouTube MP3 Podcaster

    Ever wonder how someone got a copy of a YouTube video and then edited it into their own? If you are interested being the next Ray William Johnson and vlogging of your favorite online videos, you’re going to love this add-on for Firefox. YouTube MP3 Podcaster downloads directly to Firefox which will add buttons underneath every YouTube video you ever watch on the browser. These buttons will give you different options of downloading that content, whether you want the Full HD version or just an MP3 of the audio. Download this free plugin and start saving videos to your computer right away.

    3. iRig Mic and iMovie Editing for iPhone

    Sometimes all you need is your iPhone. You might already know that your phone can take great quality video and upload directly to YouTube. But maybe you want to make your vlogs a little more impressive than just the average home video. The iRig microphone is a must if you want good audio (and any video is only as good as its audio). This will not only give you a professional image of a microphone, but the iRig has a range of settings for whatever situation you find yourself filming in. Just check out the demo video from Amazon to see how versatile it is with different atmospheres. After you film some footage with your awesome audio, throw it into the iMovie iPhone app ($4.99 in the App Store) and add some titles, background music, or transitions for multiple clips. Dang. You just made a sweet video with just your phone.

    4. Google Plus Live Hangouts

    The Google Plus social network has made it very easy to create panel or interview-type video without lifting very many fingers. All you need to do is have an account with Google Plus, start a “Hangout” video conferencing session, and enable “Hangouts On Air”. Once you start the broadcast, it will be public for people to watch and a recording will go straight to your corresponding YouTube account. Bam! Content.

    Advertising

    5. Corel Video Studio

    If you want to to take it to the next level with your video editing without being completely overwhelmed, you’ll definitely want to try Corel Video Studio ($79.95 for the software download). This is totally affordable editing software that has just enough capability to make you feel like a pro, without making you pull your hair out trying to navigate. It comes with a lot of great royalty-free music and sounds, giving you even less work to do for an impressive video. To make it even simpler, you can upload straight to Facebook and YouTube from the program!

    What are some great tools you’ve use to help make quality video content? Share them in the comments below.

    (Photo credit: Young Man Holding a Videocamera via Shutterstock)

    Advertising

    More by this author

    How to Write Your Way to a Smile How to Be the Most Interesting Person at a Networking Event Top 5 Tools for Impressive (and Easy) Vlogging

    Trending in Communication

    1The Gentle Art of Saying No 217 Ted Talks for Kids to Inspire Little Minds to Do Big Things 310 Toxic Persons You Should Just Get Rid Of 4Striving Towards Secure Attachment: How to Restructure Your Thoughts 5Being Self Aware Is the Key to Success: How to Boost Self Awareness

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    No!

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

    Advertising

    But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

    Advertising

    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

    Advertising

    But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

    1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
    2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
    3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
    4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
    5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
    6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
    7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
    8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
    9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
    10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

    Advertising

    Read Next