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The Ultimate Guide To Social Media Scheduling

The Ultimate Guide To Social Media Scheduling


    I won’t even bother asking if you use social media…of course you do. Everyone does, from Facebook to YouTube. If you have an internet connection (which I am assuming you do, if you’re reading this), then you are probably a regular social media user.

    The platform has changed the way we communicate, and with that change has come other shifts in the world of business, non-profits and even personal relationships. There is no denying the impact on society as a global entity that this technology has had.

    As a necessary (but time consuming) part of marketing these days, you might be struggling to keep up with it, however. There is so much to do in a day, especially as a business owner or freelancer, and you might feel overwhelmed. How can you make the process easier and more-focused?

    The answer, as it is with so many other things, is: through planning ahead. But how can you do that through social media, when the aim is communication?

    I always suggest scheduling updates. It is a small thing you can do that saves a lot of time and energy. All by allowing you to create a full list of status updates at once, to be released at certain times. This is especially helpful if your primary target base is in a different time zone, or if you want to hit a certain hour, even when you’re not available.

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    All you need is the right program, and there are plenty to choose from.

    Social Media Scheduling Tips

    Before listing some tools, let’s make sure we know how to schedule updates properly:

    • Try using this social media scheduling template from HubSpot: it works for Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google Plus. Just fill it in and upload right to HootSuite. Good tip here: While scheduling is great for social media productivity, you’ll still need to supplement these updates with on-the-fly content (there’s nothing better than natural and emotional hot updates sharing breaking news or your current mood).
    • How to create a social media schedule. This article is a good tutorial into getting organized. It breaks down your daily and weekly social media tasks and even outlines some essential tasks for each week day. This one is a perfect guide to getting organized.
    • How to optimize your social media schedule. This one gives most effective days and time of the day to share on each social media network (here’s some more insight into choosing best time for your social media update).

    Best time to schedule

      Best Social Media Scheduling Tools

      Obviously, there are quite a few well-known social media scheduling apps like Hootsuite, Tweetdeck and Seesmic. I’ll list them all in the summary table. So far, here are a few more:

      LaterBro

      Log in using either Twitter or Facebook, then schedule posts for either or both. You can create multiple status updates at different days and times, and then just sit back and relax. It isn’t the best program, but it is easy to use and doesn’t require a sign up. Just keep in mind that it limits your Facebook update to a much higher degree in word count than the actual site does.

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      Timely

      Timely

        Using analytics based entirely around your Twitter account, Timely works by allowing you to schedule a list of updates you would like to see on your profile. Then, it ascertains the highest impact times for the posts, and published them accordingly. This is done through looking at the last 199 tweets on your account to come up with the best time. All of it is done while you relax.

        Buffero

        Twitter users can sign up through their account, and they will be given a secret email address to put in their contact book. From there, you just email the tweets to that account. The site will then create a “buffer” full of your tweet suggestions, and release one three times a day. They have both paid and free accounts. The free plan allows up to fifteen tweets scheduled at a time.

        DoShare

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        DoShare

          One of the rare posters for Google+, this is a handy Chrome extension. It gives you a simple text editor, a draft save option and a scheduler. All from your browser, and in the same place. You can save and schedule as many as you like, and keep an eye on the status of your posts. There is also an autosave on all drafts.

          Buffer

          Available for both browsers and mobile phones, this is an awesome app. You are able to “clip” different links, photos, text, videos or just write status comments easily through the app. Then they collect them all in a buffer and release them for you, at a slow pace to space it out. They are compatible with Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

          There’s an iPhone app as well, so if you use iPhone to Tweet, like and share, be sure to examine this guide on how to use scheduling on iPhone.

          Postcron

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          What makes this an interesting program is the interface. It has been created to look similar to the one that Facebook has always had for their main page. You can easily schedule multiple posts here, in a similar way to LaterBro. This is a good one for the casual user who doesn’t need many features to be getting on with.

          Choose Your Best Scheduling Tool

          Runs onSupported social media networksBest Feature*Drawback*
          SeesmicDesktopFacebook, Twitter, LinkedInMultiple account support. You can deselect all but one accounts with one clickAlmost impossible to run on Mac
          TweetdeckDesktopFacebook, Twitter, LinkedInMultiple account support. Runs fastNo good way to organize accounts (e.g. differentiate Facebook accounts from Twitter accounts), so it may be hard to choose a few from the list
          HootsuiteOnlineFacebook, Twitter, LinkedInMultiple account support. Useful features: archiving Twitter hashtag results, analytics, auto-tweeting (through the RSS feed), etcKind of slow
          LaterBroOnlineFacebook, TwitterMinimal and easySomewhat too basic
          TimelyOnlineTwitterChooses the best “most efficient” time to run your updateN/A
          BufferoOnline (through email client)TwitterGreat app for those who spend lots of time sorting our mailPaid for more than 15 tweets a day
          DoShareGoogle ChromeGoogle PlusThe only app for Google PlusLimited to Google Chrome
          BufferOnline (Also through the buttons, mobile apps and browser addons)TwitterCollaboration, multiple account support, easier sharing (called “buffering”)N/A
          PostcronOnlineFacebook PAGECollaborate with your team membersUsed to be very useful, but is now somewhat outdated as we can schedule FB page updates using the official tool

          * The “Drawback” and “Best Feature” columns represent only my personal view and experience.

          Scheduling your posts is such a simple way to increase productivity and just give you more time to focus on other things. You can find endless programs to do it, not to mention social media dashboards like TweetDeck or HootSuite. But those above are free, easy to use and helpful, so be sure to check them out!

          (Photo credit: Social Netowrk Maze via Shutterstock)

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          Last Updated on December 16, 2018

          12 Simple Ways You Can Build A Positive Attitude

          12 Simple Ways You Can Build A Positive Attitude

          We all look for a better and happier life, but somehow we realize it’s our attitude that makes it hard to lead the life we want. How can we build a positive attitude? Grant Mathews has listed out the things (from the easiest to the hardest) we can do to cultivate this attitude on Quora:

          1. Listen to good music.

          Music definitely improves your mood, and it’s a really simple thing to do.

          2. Don’t watch television passively.

          Studies have shown that people who watch TV less are happier, which leads me to my next point…

          3. Don’t do anything passively.

          Whenever I do something, I like to ask myself if, at the end of the day, I would be content saying that I had spent time doing it. (This is why I block sites I find myself wasting too much time on. I enjoy them, but they’re just not worth it when I could be learning something new, or working on projects I care about.)

          Time is incredibly valuable.

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          4. Be aware of negativity

          A community that considers itself intelligent tends to be negativity because criticizing is seen as a signaling mechanism to indicate that you’re more intelligent than the person you corrected. This was irrationally frustrating for me – it’s one of those things you’ll stay up all night to think about.

          5. Make time to be alone.

          I initially said “take time just to be alone.” I changed it because if you don’t ensure you can take a break, you’ll surely be interrupted.

          Being with other people is something you can do to make you happy, but I don’t include it in this list because nearly everyone finds time to talk with friends. On the other hand, spending time just with yourself is almost considered a taboo.

          Take some time to figure out who you are.

          6. Exercise.

          This is the best way to improve your immediate happiness.

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          Exercise probably makes you happy. Try and go on a run. You’ll hate yourself while doing it, but the gratification that you get towards the end vastly outweighs the frustration of the first few attempts. I can’t say enough good things about exercise.

          Exercising is also fantastic because it gives you time alone.

          7. Have projects.

          Having a goal, and moving towards it, is a key to happiness.

          You have to realize though that achieving the goal is not necessarily what makes you happy – it’s the process. When I write music, I write it because writing is inherently enjoyable, not because I want to get popular (as if!).

          8. Take time to do the things you enjoy.

          That’s very general, so let me give you a good example.

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          One of the things that has really changed my life was finding small communities centered around activities I enjoy. For instance, I like writing music, so I’m part of a community that meets up to write a song for an hour every week. I love the community. I’ve also written a song every week, 37 weeks in a row, which has gradually moved me towards larger goals and makes me feel very satisfied.

          9. Change your definition of happiness.

          Another reason I think I’m more happy than other people is because my definition of happiness is a lot more relaxed than most people’s. I don’t seek for some sort of constant euphoria; I don’t think it’s possible to live like that. My happiness is closer to stability.

          10. Ignore things that don’t make you happy.

          I get varying reactions to this one.

          The argument goes “if something is making you unhappy, then you should find out why and improve it, not ignore it.” If you can do that, great. But on the other hand, there’s no reason to mope about a bad score on a test.

          There’s another counterargument: perhaps you’re moping because your brain is trying to work out how to improve. In fact, this is the key purpose of depression: Depression’s Upside – NYTimes.com

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          I can think of examples that go both ways. I remember, for instance, when I was debating a year or two ago and my partner and I would lose a round, I would mull over what we had done wrong for a long time. In that way, I got immensely better at debate (and public speaking in general – did you know debate has amazing effects on your public speaking ability? But now I really digress).

          On the other hand, there’s no way that mulling over how dumb you were for missing that +x term on the left hand side will make you better at math. So stop worrying about it, and go practice math instead.

          11. Find a way to measure your progress, and then measure it.

          Video games are addictive for a reason: filling up an experience bar and making it to the next level is immensely satisfying. I think that it would be really cool if we could apply this concept to the real world.

          I put this near the bottom of the list because, unfortunately, this hasn’t been done too often in the real world – startup idea, anyone? So you would have to do it yourself, which is difficult when you don’t even know how much you’ve progressed.

          For a while, I kept a log of the runs I had taken, and my average speed. It was really cool to see my improvement over the weeks. (Also, I was exercising. Combining the two was fantastic for boosting happiness.)

          12. Realize that happiness is an evolutionary reward, not an objective truth.

          It’s easy to see that this is correct, but this is at the bottom of the list for a reason.

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