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The Daily 5 Minutes; 9 Questions

The Daily 5 Minutes; 9 Questions

After reading my article here last week, and clicking through some of the related links to find this one, a Lifehack.org reader sent me an email with this request;

“I notice you mention the Daily 5 Minutes pretty frequently, and seems you’ve written a lot about it. Can you point me to one how-to kind of post that I can share with the rest of my managers?”

I didn’t have something to send him at the time, so I wrote it up, and thought I’d share it with all of you this week.

Hearing about it for the first time? When asked to zero in on the best of my Managing with Aloha recommendations, I tell managers that if there is just one tool they incorporate into their everyday practice, have it be The Daily 5 Minutes. Very briefly, it is a simple habit. Each day, without fail, managers are to give five minutes of no-agenda time to at least one of their employees.

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Your time is one of the most precious resources you have, and to give it as a gift to someone in the form of the Daily Five Minutes just may be one of the best work-expressions of unconditional aloha there is.

When you give it, creating it as your habit and as your workplace expectation, the D5M does so many things for you:

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  • It trains you to be a better listener, a better manager, and a better coach
  • It trains you to ask great questions
  • It improves communication effectiveness with its ease and regularity
  • It establishes great relationships with each person you give it to
  • It converts unproductive time into found opportunity
  • It eliminates workplace interruptions due to the ‘I forgots’
  • It teaches people to both give and receive time and attention at work, and
  • It assures that none of those people slip below the radar
  • It promotes inclusivity and collaboration, engagement and ownership
  • It is straightforward and simple, employing something we all can do (just talk to each other)
  • Best of all, it’s quick! It only takes 5 minutes a day!

How can you deny yourself all these benefits if you are a manager?

So about that how-to … This is the latest I have written on The Daily 5 Minutes, capturing the best of my links on the practice all in one post as Gary had requested: The Daily 5 Minutes: 9 Questions.

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The 9 Questions are designed to walk you through getting started with a full understanding of what the Daily Five Minutes involves, and the post includes a link to a pdf which is the D5M excerpt from my book. These 9 Questions come from a seminar format we teach the D5M with, when practicing via situational art role-play in our SLC classes for new supervisors. They cover what the D5M is, why it must be a habit and who it involves, what the how-to and benefits are for both givers (managers) and receivers (staff), and how to start and end it.

Why do I give it away for free? I want you to do it. Within you is all the talent we need to engineer a workplace revolution of aloha, and I am convinced that the D5M can get you started. Start it today.

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Related posts here on Lifehack.org:

Post Author:
Rosa Say is the author of Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business. She fervently believes that work can inspire, and that great managers and leaders can change our lives for the better. You can visit her here each Thursday, and on www.managingwithaloha.com. Rosa writes for Lifehack.org to freely offer her coaching to those of us who aspire to be greater than we are, for she also believes in us. Writing on What Great Managers Do is one of her favorite topics.

More by this author

Rosa Say

Rosa is an author and blogger who dedicates to helping people thrive in the work and live with purpose.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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