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Should Your Workplace Ban Facebook?

Should Your Workplace Ban Facebook?

    “I want to ban Facebook.”

    This was the statement posed to me by my project manager at my new job. He personally doesn’t like the use of Facebook at work. His opinion is that it’s a time-sink, that employees aren’t being paid to surf on Facebook.

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    While one survey has shown the drop in focus and productivity with being on Facebook , there is a flip side to the coin. If you have a social media presence on Facebook, then yes, it is your job to be on Facebook. If you work with volunteers, then perhaps you need to be on Facebook during working hours to assist in coordinating schedules. Likewise if you’re in the marketing or sales departments.

    Solving the wrong problem?

    Even if these scenarios don’t fit your situation, some people will argue that it’s a management issue, not a technology issue.

    “If you don’t want your people on Facebook during working hours, then tell them. If they can’t seem to follow that rule, then find somebody else who can.”

    True, except for the cost and time of training them. Here’s the thing. If you block it on their computers, then they will simply access it on their phones. The time sink won’t go away, but simply move to another device. True, it’ll be easier to spot, but the core problem is still there.

    Security Concerns

    From an IT Security manager’s perspective, there are some valid reasons to block Facebook at work. Compromised Facebook (and Twitter) accounts are a current form of malware distribution. Today’s users know to not open email attachments from strangers, but a link that your friend sent to you via a Facebook message or direct message in your Twitter account? Well…that’s safe because you know that person.

    Except it’s not.

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    I got caught with this one. It was in an email from my wife, who sends me links all the time. I opened it and my Yahoo account got compromised.

    These things happen. People will argue that it doesn’t matter whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus or some other site. You can still get compromised. The thing is, it’s a valid argument. SO we just block the entire Internet? Or do we load up the computers on the network with ten different anti-virus and anti-malware products and hope for the best, while our machines slow down to a crawl?

    Is it a good thing that your employee may be banning Facebook? Possibly. There are some people who have lost their jobs over posting things to Facebook. This could also be because of comments like “I’m so bored.” Some managers will take that as a challenge and either bury you in work so that you won’t be bored anymore, or worse, they’ll simply fire you because you can’t seem to find something productive to do on your own. Both possibilities are bad. It’s similar to only sending funny jokes via email to your co-workers. The occasional funny joke is fine, but when it’s all you ever send them, it sends the wrong message. The one that says “You don’t have enough to do.”

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    So where do we stand?

    The interesting thing is, the discussion is far from over on this issue. On the one hand, there’s the loss of productivity and the possible leakage of trade secrets, along with the infection vector for malware and viruses. On the other hand, employees aren’t children. They should be smart enough to know that they aren’t being paid to be on Facebook or any other social media site. However, sometimes they need a break from the task at hand, and a little dip into Farmville may do the trick. It’s not any different than walking around the block.

    Ultimately, I’m going to do what my boss tells me to do. Personally? I think that if we ban it, I will get a tremendous increase in the amount of calls and emails that I get, reporting that “they can’t get on Facebook”. Then they will be mad at me and go find another way to do it, either via their phones or by screwing up their work computers (that I have to fix). Do I agree that it’s an issue? Sure, but I don’t think that banning Facebook (or any other site) is the answer.

    What do you think? Sound off in the comments.

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    (Photo credit: Woman Signing Into Facebook on Tablet via Shutterstock)

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    Last Updated on March 5, 2021

    Science Says People Who Talk To Themselves Are Geniuses

    Science Says People Who Talk To Themselves Are Geniuses

    I talk a lot to myself. It helps me to keep my concentration on the activity on hand, makes me focus more on my studies, and gives me some pretty brilliant ideas while chattering to myself; more importantly, I produce better works. For example, right now, as I am typing, I am constantly mumbling to myself. Do you talk to yourself? Don’t get embarrassed admitting it because science has discovered that those who talk to themselves are actually geniuses… and not crazy!

    Research Background

    Psychologist-researcher Gary Lupyan conducted an experiment where 20 volunteers were shown objects, in a supermarket, and were asked to remember them. Half of them were told to repeat the objects, for example, banana, and the other half remained silent. In the end, the result shown that self-directed speech aided people to find the objects faster, by 50 to 100 milliseconds, compared to the silent ones.

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    “I’ll often mutter to myself when searching for something in the refrigerator or the supermarket shelves,” said Gary Lupyan.

    This personal experience actually made him conduct this experiment. Lupyan, together with another psychologist, Daniel Swigley, came up with the outcomes that those to talk to oneself are geniuses. Here are the reasons:

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    It stimulates your memory

    When you are talking to yourself, your sensory mechanism gets activated. It gets easier on your memory since you can visualize the word, and you can act accordingly.[1]

    It helps stay focused

    When you are saying it loud, you stay focused on your task,[2] and it helps you recognise that stuff immediately. Of course, this only helps if you know what the object you are searching looks like. For example, a banana is yellow in colour, and you know how a banana looks like. So when you are saying it loud, your brain immediately pictures the image on your mind. But if you don’t know what banana looks like, then there is no effect of saying it loud.

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    It helps you clarify your thoughts

    Every one of us tends to have various types of thoughts. Most make sense, while the others don’t. Suppose you are furious at someone and you feel like killing that person. Now for this issue you won’t run to a therapist, will you? No, what you do is lock yourself in a room and mutter to yourself. You are letting go off the anger by talking to yourself, the pros and cons of killing that person, and eventually you calm down. This is a silly thought that you have and are unable to share it with any other person. Psychologist Linda Sapadin said,[3]

    “It helps you clarify your thoughts, tend to what’s important and firm up any decisions you are contemplating.”

    Featured photo credit: Girl Using Laptop In Hotel Room/Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

    Reference

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