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London Riots and Our Need to Develop Emotional Intelligence

London Riots and Our Need to Develop Emotional Intelligence
    From The Atlanta Post

    When I was watching the London riots on the news, the song called ‘London Calling’ by the band The Clash started playing in my head.  That tune and its associated music video had the same type of anger that the London rioters were displaying.  What was happening in London was of course yet another global event that we can call a crisis and we get enough of those on TV on a regular basis.

    However, despite the occurrence of these horrible events, there are some important lessons from them for us to learn.  All we have to do is look at how some of the people from each of these events behaved.

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    The London Riots

    For example, the riots in London and other UK cities were sparked by a shooting of a crime suspect by police.  Rioters responded by turning over cars and setting them on fire.  They also smashed windows and looted store merchandise.  The offenders were obviously caught up in the emotions of the original police shooting plus the current local economic climate in general.  They decided to take their anger and frustrations out on the city.  Many were caught on camera and video with some even willingly showing how proud they were of their actions.  They were obviously not thinking about the consequences of these actions as the police soon started multiple raids arresting suspects at their homes.

    This is an example of very low emotional intelligence.  The rioters were not able to manage their actions brought on by their emotions.  As a result, many will be punished and tainted with criminal records.

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    The Japan Disaster In Contrast

    Now let’s look at another terrible world event which brought on a totally different reaction from the people affected.  The tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan devastated that country.  The damage to property and loss of life also created high emotions.  However, in contrast to what happened in London, the Japanese remained orderly and calm.  People, including those in the same age range as the London rioters, patiently waited in lines for food and supplies rations.  There were no riots, no windows smashed, no cars set on fire and no businesses were looted despite such immense losses.

    Here is an example of very high emotional intelligence.  The Japanese managed their actions well despite the emotions from such a gigantic tragedy.  Compare this to the London rioters who used a single police incident they don’t have any direct connection with, as an excuse to let loose and cause trouble.

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    What We Can Learn From Emotional Intelligence

    The Japanese survivors will recover and move on with their lives faster while the hooligans in London will either be in jail or in trouble with the law again in the future. Here we have two world events that showed two opposite ends from the emotional intelligence spectrum.  What can we learn from these?

    I would suggest that we will be more successful in many areas of life if we develop higher levels of emotional intelligence.  We will be able to interact better with others in both our careers and personal lives.  We will also be able to handle the various peaks and valleys that come our way with far more effectiveness, because we can respond to our emotions better.

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    Emotional Intelligence Can Be Developed

    It is estimated that only 15% of society is of high emotional intelligence (Nelson Mandela would be a clear example in this group).  That means the majority of us can still improve in this area.  For example, think of all the daily road rage out there.  Think of all the fights among youths that end up with somebody getting knifed or shot.  These are all results of low emotional intelligence.

    Unlike standard intelligence which is thought to be genetic, emotional intelligence is something that can be developed with training.   Many corporations have sent their executives to seminars on emotional intelligence. I was such an executive during my corporate years and made it a personal commitment to develop my own emotional intelligence ever since.

    What about you?  What are your thoughts on emotional intelligence?  Feel free to share your experiences with this area.

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    Last Updated on August 16, 2018

    10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

    10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

    The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

    In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

    Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

    1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

    What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

    Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

    2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

    Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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    How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

    Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

    Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

    3. Get comfortable with discomfort

    One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

    Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

    4. See failure as a teacher

    Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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    Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

    Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

    10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

    5. Take baby steps

    Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

    Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

    Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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    The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

    6. Hang out with risk takers

    There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

    Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

    7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

    Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

    Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

    8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

    What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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    9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

    Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

    If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

    10. Focus on the fun

    Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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