Advertising
Advertising

London Riots and Our Need to Develop Emotional Intelligence

London Riots and Our Need to Develop Emotional Intelligence
    From The Atlanta Post

    When I was watching the London riots on the news, the song called ‘London Calling’ by the band The Clash started playing in my head.  That tune and its associated music video had the same type of anger that the London rioters were displaying.  What was happening in London was of course yet another global event that we can call a crisis and we get enough of those on TV on a regular basis.

    However, despite the occurrence of these horrible events, there are some important lessons from them for us to learn.  All we have to do is look at how some of the people from each of these events behaved.

    Advertising

    The London Riots

    For example, the riots in London and other UK cities were sparked by a shooting of a crime suspect by police.  Rioters responded by turning over cars and setting them on fire.  They also smashed windows and looted store merchandise.  The offenders were obviously caught up in the emotions of the original police shooting plus the current local economic climate in general.  They decided to take their anger and frustrations out on the city.  Many were caught on camera and video with some even willingly showing how proud they were of their actions.  They were obviously not thinking about the consequences of these actions as the police soon started multiple raids arresting suspects at their homes.

    This is an example of very low emotional intelligence.  The rioters were not able to manage their actions brought on by their emotions.  As a result, many will be punished and tainted with criminal records.

    Advertising

    The Japan Disaster In Contrast

    Now let’s look at another terrible world event which brought on a totally different reaction from the people affected.  The tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan devastated that country.  The damage to property and loss of life also created high emotions.  However, in contrast to what happened in London, the Japanese remained orderly and calm.  People, including those in the same age range as the London rioters, patiently waited in lines for food and supplies rations.  There were no riots, no windows smashed, no cars set on fire and no businesses were looted despite such immense losses.

    Here is an example of very high emotional intelligence.  The Japanese managed their actions well despite the emotions from such a gigantic tragedy.  Compare this to the London rioters who used a single police incident they don’t have any direct connection with, as an excuse to let loose and cause trouble.

    Advertising

    What We Can Learn From Emotional Intelligence

    The Japanese survivors will recover and move on with their lives faster while the hooligans in London will either be in jail or in trouble with the law again in the future. Here we have two world events that showed two opposite ends from the emotional intelligence spectrum.  What can we learn from these?

    I would suggest that we will be more successful in many areas of life if we develop higher levels of emotional intelligence.  We will be able to interact better with others in both our careers and personal lives.  We will also be able to handle the various peaks and valleys that come our way with far more effectiveness, because we can respond to our emotions better.

    Advertising

    Emotional Intelligence Can Be Developed

    It is estimated that only 15% of society is of high emotional intelligence (Nelson Mandela would be a clear example in this group).  That means the majority of us can still improve in this area.  For example, think of all the daily road rage out there.  Think of all the fights among youths that end up with somebody getting knifed or shot.  These are all results of low emotional intelligence.

    Unlike standard intelligence which is thought to be genetic, emotional intelligence is something that can be developed with training.   Many corporations have sent their executives to seminars on emotional intelligence. I was such an executive during my corporate years and made it a personal commitment to develop my own emotional intelligence ever since.

    What about you?  What are your thoughts on emotional intelligence?  Feel free to share your experiences with this area.

    More by this author

    How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt How To Have A Brighter Future personal growth travel How You Can Broaden Your Horizons with Travel 20 Inspirational Quotes of All Time that Can Change Your Life How to Salvage Any Blown New Year Resolutions

    Trending in Communication

    1 9 Reasons Why a Social Media Detox Is Good for You 2 How to Turn Your Fear of Missing Out into a Joy of Missing Out 3 15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do 4 How to Find Motivation When You’re Totally Burnt Out 5 How to Quit Your Boring Life and Start Living an Interesting One

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on October 6, 2020

    15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

    15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

    Highly confident people believe in their ability to achieve. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else put their faith in you? To walk with swagger and improve your self-confidence, watch out for these fifteen things highly confident people don’t do.

    And if you want to know the difference between an arrogant person and a confident person, watch this video first:

     

    1. They don’t make excuses.

    Highly confident people take ownership of their thoughts and actions. They don’t blame the traffic for being tardy at work; they were late. They don’t excuse their short-comings with excuses like “I don’t have the time” or “I’m just not good enough”; they make the time and they keep on improving until they are good enough.

    Advertising

    2. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.

    Highly confident people don’t let fear dominate their lives. They know that the things they are afraid of doing are often the very same things that they need to do in order to evolve into the person they are meant to be.

    3. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.

    Highly confident people avoid the comfort zone, because they know this is a place where dreams die. They actively pursue a feeling of discomfort, because they know stretching themselves is mandatory for their success.

    4. They don’t put things off until next week.

    Highly confident people know that a good plan executed today is better than a great plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right circumstances”, because they know these reactions are based on a fear of change. They take action here, now, today – because that’s where progress happens.

    5. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.

    Highly confident people don’t get caught up in negative feedback. While they do care about the well-being of others and aim to make a positive impact in the world, they don’t get caught up in negative opinions that they can’t do anything about. They know that their true friends will accept them as they are, and they don’t concern themselves with the rest.

    Advertising

    6. They don’t judge people.

    Highly confident people have no tolerance for unnecessary, self-inflicted drama. They don’t feel the need to insult friends behind their backs, participate in gossip about fellow co-workers or lash out at folks with different opinions. They are so comfortable in who they are that they feel no need to look down on other people.

    7. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.

    Highly confident people can make use of whatever resources they have, no matter how big or small. They know that all things are possible with creativity and a refusal to quit. They don’t agonize over setbacks, but rather focus on finding a solution.

    8. They don’t make comparisons.

    Highly confident people know that they are not competing with any other person. They compete with no other individual except the person they were yesterday. They know that every person is living a story so unique that drawing comparisons would be an absurd and simplistic exercise in futility.

    9. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.

    Highly confident people have no interest in pleasing every person they meet. They are aware that not all people get along, and that’s just how life works. They focus on the quality of their relationships, instead of the quantity of them.

    Advertising

    10. They don’t need constant reassurance.

    Highly confident people aren’t in need of hand-holding. They know that life isn’t fair and things won’t always go their way. While they can’t control every event in their life, they focus on their power to react in a positive way that moves them forward.

    11. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.

    Highly confident people confront life’s issues at the root before the disease can spread any farther. They know that problems left unaddressed have a way of multiplying as the days, weeks and months go by. They would rather have an uncomfortable conversation with their partner today than sweep an inconvenient truth under the rug, putting trust at risk.

    12. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.

    Highly confident people get back up every time they fall down. They know that failure is an unavoidable part of the growth process. They are like a detective, searching for clues that reveal why this approach didn’t work. After modifying their plan, they try again (but better this time).

    13. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.

    Highly confident people take action without hesitation. Every day, they remind themselves, “If not me, who?”

    Advertising

    14. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.

    Highly confident people don’t limit themselves to Plan A. They make use of any and all weapons that are at their disposal, relentlessly testing the effectiveness of every approach, until they identify the strategies that offer the most results for the least cost in time and effort.

    15. They don’t blindly accept what they read on the Internet as “truth” without thinking about it.

    Highly confident people don’t accept articles on the Internet as truth just because some author “said so”. They look at every how-to article from the lens of their unique perspective. They maintain a healthy skepticism, making use of any material that is relevant to their lives, and forgetting about the rest. While articles like this are a fun and interesting thought-exercise, highly confident people know that they are the only person with the power to decide what “confidence” means.

    Read Next