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Limit Creativity, Get Innovation

Limit Creativity, Get Innovation

Go create something. I don’t care what, how much it cost, the purpose, or the form, but the result must be supremely innovative, worth every penny, and profoundly significant to the human race. Take your time.

The reasonable person finds this overwhelming. Creativity’s root is the tension filled conflict between the imagination and the physical: input and output, insight and achievement, learning and performing. Remove conflict and there is no need for creativity. Imagination v. reality – like a courtroom battle — negotiation leads to creative solutions. In onerous jargon laden corporate speak: look for the win/win.

I recollect just enough from algebra 101 to make my neuro-memories retrieve the brain pain of too many variables – x ,y, a, b, c – give me an integer – please – I don’t know what Vanna White sees in those vowels. The vagueness compelled me to walk clinging to the hallway walls attempting to reconcile formless reality as I struggled to see the patterns. Orientation needs form and the walls offer structure; something to support yet overcome.

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Authors note: Beware of those who are chronically structured: desks with paperclips stuck to magnets, micro-vacuum for computer keys, viral wipes for the phone, everything at right angles, nothing astray, and not a speck of dust. Move a chair and you’d better duck a piercing gaze set to stun. Uncomfortable with the randomness of imagination, it’s discarded for existential freeing formality. Think out of the box? No way, the walls to the box are too perfect. Besides that, It’s a padded box; very comfortable.

If you’re human, you’re creative – or at least potentially so – even if all you create is morning coffee with your special recipe of Folgers, Maxwell House and a little cinnamon. Do you really think the pleasure of life creation (a.k.a. orgasm) is a coincidence? I’m no spiritual guru, but if you want to know the meaning of life, creativity is the low hanging fruit. Like a non-linear river, it flows: imagination > passion > discovery > craft > innovation – input, output and over again.

The idea is that without conflict (constraint) there is little to challenge the creative spirit. It’s as though the river has no banks. It’s a life-sized puddle. Even unbridled creative freedom seeks structure like a paper clip to magnet. Add to the assignment: go create something, anything, but use oil paints, or play in 4/4 time, suddenly the puddle isn’t a puddle – it flows. The canvas size, instrument quality, budget, deadline, or whatever, all count as conflict, and conflict inspires process.

To borrow from personal experience, I was handed an assignment to take photographs in a Parisian garden of business people interacting. Anyone should consider an open assignment like this a blank canvas rolling in opportunity. Yet, I found my creative river was too wide, nearly a puddle; low flow. I adjusted by limiting the subject to two business people and my tools to a single camera lens. This is to say, I narrowed the channel to swell the creative tide.

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Childish artistic abandon is high in conflict: a freely imaginative and high discovery conflict that’s markedly limited in craftsmanship, insight, and intelligence but not in spirit or a fearless disregard for the impossible. In contrast, a highly skilled musician in mid career confronts with near limitless skills yet with bound passion. We learn to bridle creative passion because our bank account says, “don’t mess up” or our pride demands we out perform reputation. Aware of the impossible and fearing failure, well-healed creatives are drawn to comfort.

Creative comfort is like a professional athlete outrunning a three year old in high heels – it’s a skill mismatch owing to insecurity and laziness; Impressive and uninspiring at the same time. If creativity is your profession, failure isn’t an option at the day of delivery, yet avoiding the breakthrough borderline is to serve leftovers; tasty, but often not as good as the first time.

Dispense with the invisible nuance. Creativity is a mix of imagination, passion and craftsmanship. Like an algebraic equation, the variables aren’t equal but, nevertheless, are intimately related. For instance, high craftsmanship can carry passion and imagination on an enviable journey. Reaching new heights of world-class craftsmanship can be all-consuming, forfeiting passion and imagination. Time to reframe the conflict: perhaps a little more passion letting skill take care of itself.

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Mary Ann Mayer – Google VP – in an article for Business Week titled “Turning Limitations into Innovation” pointed out that “Creativity is often misunderstood. People often think of it in terms of artistic work — unbridled, unguided effort that leads to beautiful effect … They’re beautiful because creativity triumphed over the rules. … Creativity, in fact, thrives best when constrained.” She continues by stating, “it is from the interaction between constraint and the disregard for the impossible that unexpected insights, cleverness, and imagination are borne.”

Without doubt, “rules were meant to be broken” is an original utterance of an innovator. Artists don’t meticulously color inside the lines without existing beleaguered by craftsmanship. Constraints aren’t rules as much as they’re challenges to overcome. Don’t like the outcome? Break the rules or revise the constraints.

The proclivity to relax is often more powerful than the urge to innovate. Inspiration may involve breaking the rules and sending the imagination in a new direction. Inertial creativity is characterized by the comfort of least effort v. the pleasure of innovation. Introducing new constraints, thus spicing the conflict, tends to inspire innovation. Otherwise stated: get off your butt and try something outside your comfort zone – but first, redefine the zone.

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Artists sink into despair with a canvas too large and blank before passion smothering constraints have an effect. Creation is native to humanity; we’re born to it and because of it. Traversing the conflict of imagination and reality includes framing a canvas. An innovative solution is a dependant of the constraints, and realized in spite of the rules.

The author, Bruce DeBoer is a professional photographer and writer from North Carolina, USA. He can be reached through: http://www.DeboerWorks.com or http://www.PermissionToSuck.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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