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An Infographic To Teach You The Hacks To Write Argumentative Essays

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An Infographic To Teach You The Hacks To Write Argumentative Essays

It’s no secret that people love to argue on the Internet. It’s also no secret that a large amount of arguments in the comment section on many websites are circular, and more often than not resolve with one party attacking the other for reasons that have nothing to do with the original argument. This mud-slinging approach to argumentative writing can be avoided by paying close attention to the suggestions in this infographic.

Look at both sides of the argument

Before jumping into an argument, you should always try to see where your opponent is coming from. This isn’t to suggest that you do so to reach an agreement with your opponent; on the contrary, you want to know what he’s going to say so you are ready to refute it. Preemptively refuting the opposing side of an argument before it’s even been made is the key to writing a strong argumentative essay.

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Rely on facts

Always rely on facts when making a point. Don’t say “most” or “many”; use exact statistics, supported by evidence. Writing “most people know that…” really doesn’t prove anything. Stating “a recent poll by USA Today showed that 79% of people believe…” gives the audience a tangible statistic and a reputable source, and they’re more likely to be swayed by your argument.

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Choose Your Words Carefully

Effective Nouns

Use effective nouns when referring to people or groups in support of your argument, or who refute the opposition. Using words such as proponents, advocates, and supporter, as well as opponents and challengers are useful in argumentative writing, so you’re not stuck using the tired phrases “those in support of…” or “those who oppose…”

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Effective Verbs

In the same vein, using a variety of verbs makes your writing more engaging and effective. Use words such as allege, contend, and suggest when referring to statistics in favor of your argument. When referring to statistics that refute the opposing argument, use words such as dispute, deny, doubt, or question.

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    Source: www.kibin.com

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