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How to Treat Comorbid Depression Associated with Chronic Illness

How to Treat Comorbid Depression Associated with Chronic Illness

No one likes being sick or hurt.  Try to imagine what it would feel like to know that you would be sick or hurt forever; a person with a broken leg can often find solace in that he or she will only have to suffer from limited mobility and pain for a finite period of time, but other people are not as lucky.

While working in the field of psychology, I came into contact with a number of people who suffered from chronic illnesses like Parkinson’s disease, or the lasting effects from catastrophic medical events such as strokes.  Often, people who have been diagnosed with a chronic illness or condition suffer from comorbid depression, which is a type of depression that is resultant from a primary physical or psychological ailment.  However, comorbid depression must be taken as seriously as major depressive disorder, and there are some things caretakers can do to help treat the depression of a loved one.

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Two things everyone needs to thrive

I believe that there are two things every person needs, healthy or well.  First, every person needs a support system beyond the practitioners who are paid to help them.  There is no “right” support system.  Some people rely heavily on familial support whereas others turn to friends and neighbors.  I found that the most challenging type of person to work with was one who did not have a loved one in the world, as caretakers often need to provide companionship as well as care-taking.  In a best-case scenario, loved ones can act as caretakers and provide continual support through genuine companionship.

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The second thing every person needs is meaning. Often, limited mobility, embarrassing consequences of a speech impediment, or clumsiness due to a neurological disorder can make it difficult to go outside and face the world.  I heartily believe that every person has the capacity to do something meaningful, whether they provide support on online message boards, push the candy cart at the hospital, volunteer at a bookstore, hold a part-time job, or focus on spending time with loved ones. The idea that a person can do something meaningful after suffering from a traumatic medical diagnosis can seem like a pipe-dream, but there are many ways to help change a person’s thought patterns from “I’m useless” to “I am a good and important person.”

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Talk therapy / psychopharmalogical treatments           

There is no one-size-fits-all option for treating depression, though some of the most popular and widely accepted treatments include talk therapy and psychopharmalogical treatment (i.e. taking antidepressant medications).  Often, working with a therapist in addition to taking prescription medication can yield the best results. Keep in mind that a good therapist will not want to see patients twice a week for the rest of their lives, and similarly, people often take popular antidepressants such as SSRIs or SNRIs for a finite period of time. A good analogy I like to use is how most people recover from a knee injury: they may need to use a crutch, see a physical therapist, and take anti-inflammatory medication for a period of time so that they can heal. People suffering from depression are no different—instead of viewing the need for therapy or medication as a failure, it’s best to consider it as a temporary treatment plan so the person can heal.

Have something to look forward to

The most dangerous part of depression is that severe depression coupled with a notable medical condition can cause people to lose the will to live. When a person slips into a state of complete despair, their immune system can become less effective, leaving them susceptible to other serious conditions (e.g. a cold could more readily progress into pneumonia and have a greater chance of more complications). Try to always have something realistic to look forward to, like trips to an equine therapy center, a favorite homemade meal, visits from grandchildren, or trips to baseball games. Sometimes, spending quality time together can be the best motivator to live, improve, and thrive.

Comorbid depression is a serious condition that needs to be addressed. With increasing advances in medication and talk therapy, depression is far more treatable than it was a few decades ago. Ironically, caretakers might find that by helping treat a loved one’s depression, they can improve the quality of their own lives as well.

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Last Updated on September 17, 2019

10 Simple Ways To Always Think Positive Thoughts

10 Simple Ways To Always Think Positive Thoughts

Positive thinking can lead to a lot of positive change in your life. Developing an optimistic outlook can be good for both your physical and mental health.

But sometimes, certain situations arise in life that makes it hard to keep a positive outlook. Take steps to make positive thinking become more like your second nature and you’ll reap the biggest benefits.

Here are 10 ways to make thinking positive thoughts easy:

1. Spend Time with Positive People

If you surround yourself with constant complainers, their negativity is likely to rub off on you.

Spend time with positive friends and family members to increase the likelihood that their positive thinking habits will become yours too. It’s hard to be negative when everyone around you is so positive.

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2. Take Responsibility for Your Behavior

When you encounter problems and difficulties in life, don’t play the role of the victim. Acknowledge your role in the situation and take responsibility for your behavior.

Accepting responsibility can help you learn from mistakes and prevent you from blaming others unfairly.

3. Contribute to the Community

One of the best ways to feel good about what you have, is to focus on what you have to give.

Volunteer in some manner and give back to the community. Helping others can give you a new outlook on the world and can assist you with positive thinking.

4. Read Positive and Inspirational Materials

Spend time each day reading something that encourages positive thinking. Read the Bible, spiritual material, or inspirational quotes to help you focus on what’s important to you in life. It can be a great way to start and end your day.

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Some recommendations for you:

5. Recognize and Replace Negative Thoughts

You won’t be successful at positive thinking if you’re still plagued by frequent negative thoughts. Learn to recognize and replace thoughts that are overly negative. Often, thoughts that include words like “always” and “never” signal that they aren’t true.

If you find yourself thinking something such as, “I always mess everything up,” replace it with something more realistic such as, “Sometimes I make mistakes but I learn from them.”

There’s no need to make your thoughts unrealistically positive, but instead, make them more realistic.

6. Establish and Work Toward Goals

It’s easier to be positive about problems and setbacks when you have goals that you’re working toward. Goals will give you motivation to overcome those obstacles when you encounter problems along the way. Without clear goals, it’s harder to make decisions and gauge your progress.

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Learn to set SMART goals to help you achieve more.

7. Consider the Consequences of Negativity

Spend some time thinking about the consequences of negative thinking. Often, it can become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

For example, a person who thinks, “I probably won’t get this job interview,” may put less effort into the interview. As a result, he may decrease his chances of getting the job.

Create a list of all the ways negative thinking impacts your life. It likely influences your behavior, your relationships, and your feelings. Then, create a list of the ways in which positive thinking could be beneficial.

8. Offer Compliments to Others

Look for reasons to compliment others. Be genuine in your praise and compliments, but offer it frequently. This will help you look for the good in other people.

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9. Create a Daily Gratitude List

If you start keeping a daily gratitude list, you’ll start noticing exactly how much you have to be thankful for. This can help you focus on the positive in your life instead of thinking about all the bad things that have happened in the day.

Getting in the habit of showing an attitude of gratitude makes positive thinking more of a habit. Here’re 40 Simple Ways To Practice Gratitude.

10. Practice Self-Care

Take good care of yourself and you’ll be more equipped to think positively.

Get plenty of rest and exercise and practice managing your stress well. Taking care of your physical and mental health will provide you with more energy to focus on positive thinking.

Learn about these 30 Self-Care Habits for a Strong and Healthy Mind, Body and Spirit.

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Featured photo credit: DESIGNECOLOGIST via unsplash.com

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