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How to Memorize a Numbered List Using Memory Pegging

How to Memorize a Numbered List Using Memory Pegging


    Memory pegging techniques are particularly useful for remembering numbered lists. Every list can be treated as a numbered list. We ‘peg’ each item to a visual symbol for its number. The method I would recommend is a rhyming approach.

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    In fact, I’ve mentioned the list below in my book, How to Be a Brilliant Thinker:

    1. Ton – One ton
    2. Zoo
    3. Tree
    4. Door
    5. Hive (with bees buzzing around)
    6. Sticks
    7. Heaven
    8. Gate
    9. Line (fishing line)
    10. Den (e.g. the lion’s den)
    11. Soccer 11
    12. Shelf
    13. Hurting
    14. Courting
    15. Lifting
    16. Licking
    17. Leavening (baking bread)
    18. Hating
    19. Lightning
    20. Plenty (horn of plenty)
    21. 21 Gun Salute

    Say our task was to remember the first 12 elements in the periodic table. They are:

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    1. Hydrogen
    2. Helium
    3. Lithium
    4. Beryllium
    5. Boron
    6. Carbon
    7. Nitrogen
    8. Oxygen
    9. Fluorine
    10. Neon
    11. Sodium
    12. Magnesium

    Most people would find this a fairly difficult list to remember in sequence but we can do so by associating the image of the number with an image for the element. For example:

    1. A hydrogen bomb with a one ton weight hanging below
    2. Laughing hyenas at the zoo. They are laughing because they inhaled helium gas.
    3. A tree in our garden lit at night. (Lit gives us Lithium)
    4. Who is at the door?  It is Beryl
    5. We imagine ourself boring into a hive full of bees – suddenly they swarm out.
    6. We have some very old sticks which we are going to date using carbon dating.
    7. The heavens at night. We think of a star-filled night sky. (Night gives us Nitrogen)
    8. Behind the gate is a tent.  It is an oxygen tent and there is someone inside.
    9. We pull up our fishing line and find several tubes of fluoride toothpaste.
    10. There is a flashing light in the lion’s den.  The neon tube in the light needs to be replaced.
    11. Next week we have to play Sodium United. Their nickname is the Sods.
    12. On our shelf in the kitchen is a bottle of Magnesium Salts.

    The more dramatic or ridiculous the image, the easier it is to remember.  Now we can easily remember any of the first 12 elements and give its Atomic Number. If you have to remember 40 or 60 items then you can do so by using a red list, a blue list and a yellow list. So 5 would be a red hive, 22 a blue zoo, and 51…a yellow soccer team.

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    Try this method when you next have an important list to memorize. After a little practice, you will be surprised at how well it works.

    (Photo credit: Plenty on His Mind via Shutterstock)

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    Paul Sloane

    Professional Keynote Speaker, Author, Innovation Expert

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    Last Updated on October 15, 2018

    Why Helping Others Actually Helps Yourself

    Why Helping Others Actually Helps Yourself

    Helping others: it’s a fundamental part of humanity, bonding together and helping a fellow man or woman. In times of tragedy, the stories of those who help others are inspiring, such as helping the nation recover from national disasters and terrorist attacks. Some men and women even devote their lives to helping others, from the police force that protects our cities, to the fire departments who run into burning buildings, to the service men and women who risk their lives for the common good.

    “No one has ever become poor by giving.” ― Anne Frank, diary of Anne Frank

    But helping others isn’t limited to these grand gestures or times of tribulation. Helping others can be done each and every day. And contrary to what you may have heard, helping others doesn’t always have to be a selfless act. It’s important to understand that helping others can actually help yourself. No matter what the motivation, getting out and helping others is the key. So in that spirit of motivation, here are 5 reasons why helping others actually helps yourself.

    1. Quid Pro Quo

    When you help someone, they will be more likely to help you. This is the basic, unspoken agreement that fuels nearly every move. I’ll spend my entire day lugging boxes, but you owe me. It’s much easier to find help when someone knows you’d do the same for them. They may not always live up to their end of the bargin, and you may not either. But if you help enough people and do many good deeds, it will be given back when needed.

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    2. Karma goes both ways.

    All too often, the idea of Karma is described in a negative way. If you do bad, bad will come find you. But it works the other way too. When you are a good person and help people, good things seem to happen. And while you may not believe in an inter-connected universe that rewards good deeds, there is something to be said about how helping others changes your perspective. When you’re helping others, you will often feel better about yourself, increasing the likelihood that your next experience will be a positive one, rather than a negative one.

    3. Doing good feels good.

    It’s maybe the most cited benefit of doing good: you’ll feel great. Helping others is a great way to feel better about yourself. Seeing a smile or even tears of joy makes it all worth it. It’s as simple as that.

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    4. Good publicity is the best publicity.

    People notice when you’re doing good. It may not be the reason you help out, but someone is always watching. Even the simplest gesture can make an awesome impression.

    When I was in college, I had a class that helped out at a school for a full day. I worked with a small group of high school students who were incredibly interested in writing, and I had a great time. I asked the teacher if I could come back on my own time and work with these students to finish this project we were working on, to which she agreed.

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    I went two more times that week, thinking nothing more about it. Fast forward a few weeks: I received a letter in the mail stating I had been chosen as a Presidential Grant Recipient for the summer and received a $2,000 stipend to work with a group of students and professors on a research project over the summer. I was floored, as I hadn’t even applied. I was nominated by that teacher who appreciated the work I did with her students. It wasn’t expected, but helping others ended up opening a door I never would have known was even available.

    5. Helping others looks good on a resume or application.

    Is your resume looking a little thin? Does your college application need a bit of pizzaz? Volunteering your time and energy to help others makes your resume and applications look as good as it makes you feel. Hiring managers look favorably on volunteer work and many acceptance committees use it to separate similar candidates. So read to some first graders, volunteer at the homeless shelter, and volunteer at your local Boys and Girl Club. Your resume will thank you.

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    Featured photo credit: xavi talleda via flickr.com

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