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How Not To Check Email At Work

How Not To Check Email At Work
How Not To Check Email At Work

More today than ever, email is a part of the workplace. In offices, even home offices, email is an indispensable tool that allows for quick, casual and formal conversation.

Using email effectively is the key to productivity. More so, using it as little as possible at appropriate times is key. Here’s how you shouldn’t check your email while working.

The Do Nots:

1. Check mail first thing in the morning

Get started on work first, then check mail at a specific time afterwards. When you begin with email, it muddles your day. You’ve suddenly got 10 things to think about without having started any work for the day.

Don’t touch your email until after an hour. Any important messages, memos, meetings etc, can be passed to you by co-workers. You’ll be much more productive getting an early start on your work before any distractions.

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Never Check Your Email First Or Last – [LifeDev]

2. Reply immediately

Organize what emails need action and set a time in day to reply to them all. Rarely do emails need actioning immediately. Save/organize/star the emails you want to reply to and set a time to handle them later.

Other than preventing you from spending half and hour checking and replying and thinking about replying to emails, this will also allow you some time to casually think about your responses. Maybe you decide you don’t even need to reply to some.

Apply the GTD 2-minute rule, but halve it. If you can write a reply to an email in 1 minute or less, then reply right away. Otherwise, put it away to reply later.

Remember the 4 D’s when deciding what to do with each email.

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  • 1. Delete it – Delete
  • 2. Do it – reply if under 1 minute
  • 3. Delegate it – forward if actionable for someone else
  • 4. Defer it – put away [folder/star etc] for later

3. Check personal emails/ blog stats etc

Have a work email or filter personal/work contacts so you’re only receiving work-related emails while at work.

You don’t need to handle personal emails at work. If you like to relax and check those on your break, do so, but don’t let it affect your workflow. If you see an email from a friend amongst work emails, it’ll be hard to resist reading. Keep them separate and organize your time.

If you do use your work email for personal emails also, like in this NYTimes report, I would suggest filtering everything you can so work stays work and play stays at home.

Use the Greasemonkey Filter Assistant script to easily create filters for email contacts.

4. Get notified

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If you use Outlook or an email client that allows desktop/browser notifications, turn them off. Nothing disrupts your workflow like email notifications popping up.

Set times to check; maybe twice a day. Intersperse these with your reply times. Email isn’t a live conversation. No-one expects you to reply straight after they send one through, people will begin to expect your emails at your designated reply-only times.

This takes discipline, but does wonders to keep you on track.

If you use something like Gmail Notifier, you can disable automatic email checks and only check emails manually.

5. Spend a lot of time on replying

Emails aren’t novels. They shouldn’t even be long conversations. Keep your replies as succinct as possible. Give straight answers and stay on point.

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If you receive long emails, do your best to speed read so you’re not spending more than a few minutes on each email. When replying to a long email, keep it ultra-short. Use dot points and make it easy for the recipient to reply with short answers.

Try the Time Tracker Firefox extension to track time spent on emails. It comes with stats and an alarm.

The Do:

Set up a system that works for you.

If you require constant updates of emails, then keep notifications up. Maybe find a better way to get those updates, like through your mobile. If your workplace has bad email practices, or you see a lot of time wasted, talk to someone about it.

If you’re a GMail user, get into filters and learn how to use them well.

Set a schedule to include email checking and replying. Email should make work faster and more productive.

More by this author

Craig Childs

Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

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Last Updated on August 12, 2019

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

Mentally strong people have healthy habits. They manage their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors in ways that set them up for success in life.

Take a look at these 13 things that mentally strong people don’t do so that you too can become mentally stronger.

1. They Don’t Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves

Mentally strong people don’t sit around feeling sorry about their circumstances or how others have treated them. Instead, they take responsibility for their role in life and understand that life isn’t always easy or fair.

2. They Don’t Give Away Their Power

They don’t allow others to control them, and they don’t give someone else power over them. They don’t say things like, “My boss makes me feel bad,” because they understand that they are in control over their own emotions and they have a choice in how they respond.

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3. They Don’t Shy Away from Change

Mentally strong people don’t try to avoid change. Instead, they welcome positive change and are willing to be flexible. They understand that change is inevitable and believe in their abilities to adapt.

4. They Don’t Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control

You won’t hear a mentally strong person complaining over lost luggage or traffic jams. Instead, they focus on what they can control in their lives. They recognize that sometimes, the only thing they can control is their attitude.

5. They Don’t Worry About Pleasing Everyone

Mentally strong people recognize that they don’t need to please everyone all the time. They’re not afraid to say no or speak up when necessary. They strive to be kind and fair, but can handle other people being upset if they didn’t make them happy.

6. They Don’t Fear Taking Calculated Risks

They don’t take reckless or foolish risks, but don’t mind taking calculated risks. Mentally strong people spend time weighing the risks and benefits before making a big decision, and they’re fully informed of the potential downsides before they take action.

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7. They Don’t Dwell on the Past

Mentally strong people don’t waste time dwelling on the past and wishing things could be different. They acknowledge their past and can say what they’ve learned from it.

However, they don’t constantly relive bad experiences or fantasize about the glory days. Instead, they live for the present and plan for the future.

8. They Don’t Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over

Mentally strong people accept responsibility for their behavior and learn from their past mistakes. As a result, they don’t keep repeating those mistakes over and over. Instead, they move on and make better decisions in the future.

9. They Don’t Resent Other People’s Success

Mentally strong people can appreciate and celebrate other people’s success in life. They don’t grow jealous or feel cheated when others surpass them. Instead, they recognize that success comes with hard work, and they are willing to work hard for their own chance at success.

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10. They Don’t Give Up After the First Failure

Mentally strong people don’t view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

11. They Don’t Fear Alone Time

Mentally strong people can tolerate being alone and they don’t fear silence. They aren’t afraid to be alone with their thoughts and they can use downtime to be productive.

They enjoy their own company and aren’t dependent on others for companionship and entertainment all the time but instead can be happy alone.

12. They Don’t Feel the World Owes Them Anything

Mentally strong people don’t feel entitled to things in life. They weren’t born with a mentality that others would take care of them or that the world must give them something. Instead, they look for opportunities based on their own merits.

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13. They Don’t Expect Immediate Results

Whether they are working on improving their health or getting a new business off the ground, mentally strong people don’t expect immediate results. Instead, they apply their skills and time to the best of their ability and understand that real change takes time.

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Featured photo credit: Candice Picard via unsplash.com

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