Advertising
Advertising

Every Blogger Should Avoid These 15 Mistakes To Get Popular

Every Blogger Should Avoid These 15 Mistakes To Get Popular

A lot of bloggers are constantly on the hunt for a better design, higher quality content, sharper photography and many more viewers than they already have.

While there’s nothing bad about investing more money and time in your blog, you might find it easier to try “removing” some things before adding more.

Especially if you run a small to medium sized blog, these 15 eye-opening tips will help you eliminate some behaviors that are getting in your way. In order to make your hard work get the feedback it deserves, you should avoid these common blogging mistakes.

1. Not having a clear motivation for blogging

When blogs started to come around, they were digital formats of journals and diaries. But today the options are endless and you can make your blog about whatever you feel like. What’s important about having a clear motivation is that it will keep you on track and remind you why you started everything when things become rough (because they will soon) or when you lack ideas.

How to avoid it:

Be clear about why you want to blog and this will help you shape up the content you’re creating, and readers will find it much easier to recognize your voice.

2. Relying on giveaways and other shortcuts to attract readers

You will for sure get a ton of comments if you host giveaways. You will acquire many new viewers as soon as you do a linkup, and of course people will sign up for your weekly newsletter if you offer them a free e-book.

But I bet readers won’t even remember your blog’s name after they comment on the giveaway and they might trash the newsletter email because your name or blog won’t sound familiar.

How to avoid it:

It’s better to have ten readers that comment daily and spread your content with friends than a thousand new subscribers that don’t even know who you are. For your next giveaway, you might want to ask your readers what keeps them coming back to your blog or what they’d like to see more of, so you’ll get to know what works and what doesn’t.

3. Creating content that is fashionable or searchable for the moment

There’s no reason why you can’t create vacation posts come summer, but writing about the latest trend in yoga classes while you barely go to the gym yourself won’t do anyone a favor.

Advertising

Readers notice unnatural and suspicious content immediately and there’s nothing worse for your blog than to make people feel like you’re treating them as dummies.

How to avoid it:

While it’s okay to experiment occasionally, you’d better stick to blogging about what comes natural to you, what you love doing and what you are trying to learn. Nobody is going to demand everything from you, that’s why there are so many blogs out there.

4. Obsessing with numbers and page views

While the bitter truth is that low numbers mean only a few people are reading what you pour your hard work into, bigger numbers don’t automatically mean the whole world is appreciating your work. You might get a crazy view count once a post is shared through a famous website, but if you haven’t prepared your blog for that, the next day will be low in numbers as always.

How to avoid it:

Create content for your target audience from day one. When those readers meet your blog, they will find what they need, subscribe and never leave you again.

Also, choose to work with companies that focus on the importance of what a single person has to say and not only rely on numbers and statistics.

5. Not replying to readers’ comments

There’s no biggest joy for a blogger than reading comments. But somehow a week has gone by and you haven’t answered those questions about your design process yet or haven’t thanked the nice reader who wrote a long paragraph expressing how your last post changed their life. Sound familiar?

How to avoid it:

Even if you have thousands of comments to read daily, try answering the readers’ questions. Also, don’t forget a few “thank you-s” every now and then through social media channels or at the bottom of a post. Consider doing it especially when your readers’ reactions surprised you so they are constantly reminded you appreciate the time they devote to your blog.

6. Looking around for inspiration before writing your posts

Sometimes you are drained and no idea seems decent to put out there. So you assume it’s the perfect time to browse favorite blogs for inspiration. Beside risking spending the whole day in front of the screen and doing nothing else, you will probably get input from someone else and post about the same thing. Or perhaps the visuals you see will make you want to design a similar style for your own post.

Advertising

How to avoid it:

Try to compile your content schedule at least a week or two upfront, so you won’t be particular to current trends and follow what everyone else is doing. If you write your posts and publish them on the same day, make it a strict rule not to browse other websites unless you’ve hit publish on your post for the day.

7. Not sharing the love

There are so many hard working bloggers out there with a distinctive voice. You probably discover at least an article/post/essay daily that is worth sharing. But sometimes you are too busy to make that happen or even assume the blogger doesn’t need your share because they already have so many followers.

How to avoid it:

What you share is equally important to what you create. So you better have “worth reading” links in between your own posts. You might also want to consider discovering and sharing the work of less known bloggers, in order to stray away from links that have made the round of internet already. Consider sharing amongst your own niche or completely different themes too, while mixing the two together.

8. Not networking

It’s not impossible to thrive in blogging without networking, but it could be extremely hard. Especially if you come from a country full of great bloggers, it might be a pain to get noticed. In addition, blogging is a relatively new profession and not many people understand many things about it, so having someone to talk to about difficulties or just to celebrate a milestone is crucial.

How to avoid it:

Don’t be shy to reach out first and tell someone you read his/her blog daily and appreciate the hard work. Be personal, mentioning a specific thing you like, such as their sense of humor or the beautiful photography. If possible, organize meetings with bloggers living near you. You might end up getting along in real life and support each other in the online world too.

9. Posting something light, just to fill in a day

Life happens and more often than expected, bloggers don’t have everything together.

You could have overslept, taken a longer vacation time to join your family on the beach or just can’t come up with great ideas. If you always aim for high quality content, a light and fluffy post won’t look good a year from now and you will regret posting it. It’s better not to post anything at all than something you’re not proud of.

How to avoid it:

Advertising

On days like that, you can ask a fellow blogger to guest post on your blog or you can just share your best old content in a new way, by doing a thematic round up of links. However, don’t be afraid to be real with your readers. If they know you’re not feeling okay or something is going on in your life, their support might get you back on track faster.

10. Falling into the comparison trap

With so many websites posting great content multiple times a day, with flawless images and well researched texts, it’s not easy to keep feeling proud about your own blog at all times. What you shouldn’t forget is that many blogs are run by a team and they need a lot of money to run smoothly, so they are accepting far more sponsors than you are.

How to avoid it:

Notice when you blog faster and when ideas strike write them down. Try to do writing in bulk, take pictures on a good lighting day and edit everything at once. These will make your blogging much faster and organized. Also, don’t forget that you’re doing your best. Consistency, quality and honesty are valued more than anything else you might bother with.

11. Accepting every single offer that comes your way

It might be tempting to say “yes” to every email that says, “We love your blog! Would you like to work with us?”, especially when you’ve just started blogging. While that might be fun at first, spending your time and your valuable blog space with companies that you’re not interested in is such a wasteful way of blogging.

How to avoid it:

Work to achieve  your dream collaborations and create the work you want your favorite people/brands to see when they come across your blog. Be selective and don’t be afraid to say “no” when the proposal is not a great fit. But be kind and leave some doors open for possible future collaborations.

12. Telling people to do something just because you think so

Indicating you know best or have heard a lot of people say so is not the right tactic to approach your readers. Phrases like “go out and buy this” or “stop doing this today” are not professional and might even offend readers.

How to avoid it:

Give people options and tips based on different conditions. If you’re talking clothes, consider examples based on budget. For beauty items, give an option for every skin type or age range. You should never say a particular thing is the only or best answer.

13. Not personalizing sponsored content

No matter how much bloggers want to believe the contrary, most readers are put off by sponsored content and especially posts written by a brand representative. Every blog is a personal space and the owner can do anything they like, but you better use your own voice to express things. It is important that sponsored content is sparse and clearly stated as such.

Advertising

How to avoid it:

Even if you are reviewing a product you were sent for free or you accepted money from the brand, everything will seem more reliable if you share your own experience. This way the readers will know your opinion is true and it’s not the money you were given that made you love an unheard of before gadget.

14. Ignoring user experience

It is very easy to spend all of your time on making sure your design is cohesive, with easy to read text. But what you might miss is that your website could not load correctly on a different browser or pop up ads might appear every time a reader clicks on a link.

Also, don’t forget that colors never look the same on two different screens. So you might want to check things before you spend all your time perfecting them for your own browser/monitor/device.

How to avoid it:

Follow yourself on every social media and subscribe via email to see how everything looks from a reader’s perspective. Notice if things are published on time, how the graphics look on different formats and if the post looks the same on a mobile browser. It might seem like a chore to do, but it’s crucial to try it  when you start out and every time you switch hosts, blog URL or launch a redesign.

15. Not giving readers enough options to follow you

No one can deny that keeping up with all the social media platforms is a huge task. Adding the new ones that seem to appear daily out of nowhere, things surely get insane. But since blogging relies heavily on social media, you can’t justify not using them correctly. You should not only use these platforms to promote your blog and your latest posts, but also treat them as the readers’ tool to keep in touch with you.

How to avoid it:

Try to be on all the social media your users are, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, Pinterest, Bloglovin, to mention a few. You can cut time by using apps that schedule posts. Also, don’t forget to provide the option to your readers to subscribe by email.

Featured photo credit: http://deathtothestockphoto.com/ via deathtothestockphoto.com

More by this author

30 unusual things to do at night during your travels 30 Unusual Things You Can Do At Night During Your Travels birthday gifts Do People Really Want Birthday Gifts? Every Blogger Should Avoid These 15 Mistakes To Get Popular Every Blogger Should Avoid These 15 Mistakes To Get Popular 26 Simple Ways To Add Style To Your Home 11 Things To Let Go Of And You 11 Things To Let Go Of And You’ll Be More Productive

Trending in Communication

1 11 Red Flags in a Relationship Not To Ignore 2 10 Strategies to Keep Moving Forward When Feeling Stuck 3 Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating 4 7 Simple Ways To Be Famous In One Year 5 How To Feel Happier (10 Scienece-Backed Ways)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on February 11, 2021

Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

Perceptual Barrier

The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

Advertising

The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

Attitudinal Barrier

Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

Advertising

The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

Language Barrier

This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

Advertising

Emotional Barrier

Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

Cultural Barrier

Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

Advertising

The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

Gender Barrier

Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

Reference

Read Next