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3 Ruthless Email Responses to Achieve Inbox Zero

3 Ruthless Email Responses to Achieve Inbox Zero
    Take an axe to your inbox with ruthless responses.

    I’ve become an email killer.

    It’s not that I hate email, it’s that I hate email backlog. It happens to the best of us. We save emails that we can’t initially reply to yet, we hold onto emails that we want to dive into at a later date and we keep emails as a reminder of an action we have to take. The result is usually a very full inbox staring back at us as we try to get the stuff done that actually matters.

    I’m not saying that individual emails don’t matter; often they contain information or are from people that do matter. What I am saying is that email as a whole doesn’t matter. Living in your inbox dwelling with your emails is like hanging out at the post office trying to do other work while you wait for your mail to arrive. I highly doubt any of us sit by our mailbox waiting for the mailman to arrive, or leave mail unopened as reminders that we have to deal with it later. Sure, some of us open mail and dedicate time to dealing with it later but it’s a visual item. Unlike email, it isn’t as easy to bury.

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    Rather than discuss ways to get through your email or how to categorize it either through filters or some other strategy, I’m going to offer 3 email responses that will annihilate your email and get your mind out of your inbox and back onto what matters — and allow you to avoid email bankruptcy. Each response is appropriate for certain circumstances — of which there are really only three:

    1. Timely follow-up correspondence is needed.
    2. No follow-up needed.
    3. No need for it at all.

    Feel free to use these email responses so that you can push through your inbox and get on with what you need to focus on — just make sure you replace the generic text with what you need to address, as well as the appropriate salutations and signature. Save these either as a text file, as a TextExpander snippet or in Gmail as a “canned response” — or whatever works best for your setup.

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    Follow-up Email Needed

    Thank you for your email. I’m glad you reached out to contact me regarding INSERT SUBJECT HERE.

    That said, while I’m interested in what you’ve offered, my time is at a premium these days. I’ll give the matter further thought and will get back to you within the next “X” business days. If you require an answer sooner than that, simply respond to this email and give me a timetable so I can see if I can make something happen on my end.

    Again, thanks for your email and I look forward to hearing back from you shortly.

    Follow-up Email Not Needed

    Thanks for your email regarding INSERT SUBJECT HERE. I appreciate the time you’ve taken to give me a heads up on this.

    Unfortunately, it’s not something that I’m willing to take on at this time as I have other matters that require my attention.

    Again, thank you for reaching out to me and good luck with INSERT SUBJECT HERE.

    No Need to Respond

    Delete it. Now.

    (And yes, deleting an email is a response. Either to you or to the sender, depending on the subject matter.)

    Let the Ruthlessness Begin

    There’s no sense in using your email inbox as a place to manage your tasks, projects and communication. Just like you don’t leave mail piling up in your mailbox, you shouldn’t leave email piling up in your inbox. It’s impractical on so many levels, primarily to your productivity. Email responses should be dealt with in a thoughtful and efficient manner — not swept under the rug. The best way to break the habit of email hoarding is by being ruthless with your inbox.

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    Start using these responses today and you’ll find that your time in your email inbox will be lessened and your time delivering actionable results on what you really need to do will be enhanced. You’ll escape the rapture of the inbox and reap the rewards of conquering it.

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    Mike Vardy

    A productivity specialist who shows you how to define your day, funnel your focus, and make every moment matter.

    4 Simple Steps to Brain Dump for a Smarter Brain Get What Matters Done by Scheduling Time Blocks What Everyone Is Wrong About Achieving Inbox Zero Why Is Productivity Important? 10 Reasons to Become More Productive How to Use a Calendar to Create Time and Space

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    Last Updated on January 21, 2020

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

    Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

    So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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    1. Listen

    Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

    2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

    Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

    “Why do you want to do that?”

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    “What makes you so excited about it?”

    “How long has that been your dream?”

    You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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    3. Encourage

    This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

    4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

    After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

    5. Dream

    This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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    6. Ask How You Can Help

    Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

    7. Follow Up

    Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

    Final Thoughts

    By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

    Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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    Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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