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Canned Responses: Which Emails Should You Standardize?

Canned Responses: Which Emails Should You Standardize?

    I’ve got a whole stack of standard responses that I cut and paste into emails. There are certain requests for information, for instance, that I get on a pretty regular basis. I don’t really have an interest in retyping the same message over and over again, so I have saved my commonly used emails and just cut and paste. Gmail made that whole process much easier this week with the new Canned Response feature available from Google Labs. I have it turned on and I’ve been converting all my saved messages into canned responses. It’s given me an opportunity to take a look at the messages I routinely use, and I figured I’d share them with you.

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    My Standard Emails

    1. Availability — Whenever someone wants to meet, whether in person, over the phone or online, I find it easiest to just paste in my normal availability and best times for meetings. I do tweak the email after I get my normal availability listed; after all, I might have a non-reoccuring appointment to take into consideration. But, for many of us, a general email about what time of day we are free isn’t going to vary much from week to week.
    2. Forms — I have a couple of reports that I have to send out once a week. I’ve created basic text forms, where I just add the current week’s information. I do something similar with my invoices, but I have to be very careful about making sure that my books and emails match up.
    3. Nagging Emails — There are a whole set of emails that I really hate having to send and I’ve lumped them all into my ‘nagging’ emails pile. I’ve got form emails for reminding clients that payments are late, that someone has violated my copyright and all the other letters that ten years ago I would have just Xeroxed and stuffed in an envelope.
    4. Cover Letters — As a freelancer, I’m pretty much always looking for work. I know a couple of full-time employees who are also on a perpetual hunt, too. We all make a habit of looking for work that will fit us and responding with a cover letter, a resume and some samples. It’s exceedingly rare that I’ll write a cover letter from scratch. I’m pretty confident in my cover letter; it’s already landed me plenty of work. There are some jobs that I don’t do more than change the name at the top before sending out my email.
    5. Websites — I belong to a couple of websites that I routinely receive email from that I have to respond to. One, for instance, is a site that allows me to trade books. I have to email other members to exchange shipping information on a regular basis. This category of emails is one reason I’m particularly excited about Canned Responses: I want to set up filters to handle responding to such emails automatically without my having to do anything except go to the post office. Craigslist is the sort of site that a canned response is especially ideal for.
    6. Projects — When I’m starting a new project, there’s a few general question I like to start with so that everyone involved has a similar idea of what we’re working on. While those questions don’t generally make up a complete email starting a project, I like being able to drop them in easily. I have a few other bits and pieces of text that are useful on emails for a lot of different projects, such as requests for certain types of information necessary to proceed.

    The Key is Customization

    I have plenty of other standard emails. But I don’t want you to get the idea that I only send out form emails — that I never put thought into the messages I send out. With only a few exceptions, it’s pretty rare that I send out one of my standard responses without adding, tweaking or generally changing it up. My standard responses are more templates than form letters, in most cases.

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    I started using templates as a way to cut down the amount of time I spent staring at my email inbox. If I have at least a starting point for the most common emails I receive, I can pound out the full email in short order. I can answer a full day’s worth of email in half the time that it would take if I started from scratch on each one. Lately, it seems like it takes more time for me to copy and paste a response than it does for me to tweak that message for its recipient.

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    If I think I’ve had to answer the same question twice, I generally save my response. I’ve got a pretty healthy file now — even though some of my responses aren’t actually useful on a very regular basis. But I’ve found that, as my stack of standard emails has grown, I’ve got some sort of template response for 90 percent of the email I get.

    Canned Response will make those template easier to manage, I think: I’ve used simple text files, TextExpander and even drafts in my Gmail account to try to manage my standard responses. While all of those options are okay, none of them are great — they weren’t really created with such a task in mind. But Canned Response really is made with this approach to email in mind. Those other methods will continue to work, however, if you aren’t interested in using Gmail.

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    Last Updated on January 21, 2020

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

    Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

    So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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    1. Listen

    Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

    2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

    Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

    “Why do you want to do that?”

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    “What makes you so excited about it?”

    “How long has that been your dream?”

    You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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    3. Encourage

    This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

    4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

    After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

    5. Dream

    This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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    6. Ask How You Can Help

    Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

    7. Follow Up

    Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

    Final Thoughts

    By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

    Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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