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Bill Gates 5 Favorite Books Of 2014 Which Cover Different Aspects Of Life

Bill Gates 5 Favorite Books Of 2014 Which Cover Different Aspects Of Life

Bill Gates is the first to admit that his 2014 reading list has a prominent theme: business and economics. If you are interested in the adventures on Wall Street, intrigued by the incredible development of Asia or want to know more about the controversial topic of inequality then you need to add these books to your 2015 Reading List!

1. Business Adventures by John Brooks

Bill Gates
    fortune.com

    Where better to start than with a book that Gates himself describes as ‘a neglected classic’ and his ‘favorite business book ever’. Loaned to him by business magnate Warren Buffet, Business Adventures is a collection of John Brooks’ 1960 New Yorker articles that together form engaging theories and strategies anyone can use to understand the intimidating world of business.

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    Read If: You need some insight into the world of business. Although the articles may be half a century old, they have aged wonderfully and still apply!

    2. Capital In The Twenty-First Century, By Thomas Piketty

    71WAlQenprL
      amazon.co.uk

      There is a chance you’ve heard of Thomas Piketty’s book Capital In The Twenty-First Century as it sparked a global controversy and discussion about inequality. Whilst most people – including Gates himself – don’t agree with everything that Piketty writes, the ultimate conclusion that governments need to work towards eradicating inequality is largely supported. Many people who have read this book agree that Capital sets the agenda for the next generation of politicians and the public around the world, with Gates himself saying that he ‘hopes it draws in more smart people to study the causes of, and cures for, inequality’.

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      Read If: You want to be fully informed on the inequality debate!

      3. How Asia Works, By Joe Studwell

      How-asia-works
        nashua.co.za

        When it comes to sustained economic growth, there is no place on Earth more successful than Asia. But how have countries like China, Malaysia, Japan and South Korea all managed to keep expanding, and why hasn’t the rest of the world caught on? After spending two decades as a reporter in Asia, Joe Studwell has applied his extensive knowledge and experience and explains just how Asia has managed to keep growing. According to Gates, Studwell manages to narrow down Asia’s triumph to one three-step plan: ‘(1) create conditions for small farmers to thrive, (2) use the proceeds from agricultural surpluses to build a manufacturing base focused on exports, and (3) nurture both these sectors with financial institutions closely controlled by the government’.

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        Read If: You are interested in the development of Asia and how their strategies could be applied throughout the world.

        4. The Rosie Effect, By Graeme Simsion

        the-rosie-effect
          emmaloubookblog.wordpress.com

          The only fictional book on Gates’ list, The Rosie Effect, continues to explore the world and marital adventures of Don Tillman after marrying his wife Rosie in the prequel The Rosie Project. Gates says ‘it’s a funny novel that also made me think about relationships: what makes them work and how we have to keep investing time and energy to make them better. A sweet, entertaining, and thought-provoking book’.

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          Read If: You enjoy a great love story or comedy, stuffed with thrills and adventure.

          5. Make The Modern World: Materials And Dematerialization, By Vaclav Smil

          0099151_b
            afisha.lt

            Smil’s books grace Bill Gates’ list of must-read books almost every year and nothing’s changed! This year, Smil’s book focuses on the world of materials and just how much of our resources go into creating this world made of cement, plastic, metal and wood. Should we continue to consume materials at this worrying rate? Will the demand ever decline? These and other questions are explored and answered in Make The Modern World: Materials And Dematerialization.

            Read If: You are interested in the future of our humble Earth and demanding society.

            Featured photo credit: Best Books 2014 | Bill Gates via gatesnotes.com

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            Last Updated on December 2, 2018

            7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

            7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

            When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

            You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

            1. Connecting them with each other

            Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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            It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

            2. Connect with their emotions

            Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

            For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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            3. Keep going back to the beginning

            Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

            On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

            4. Link to your audience’s motivation

            After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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            Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

            5. Entertain them

            While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

            Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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            6. Appeal to loyalty

            Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

            In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

            7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

            Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

            Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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