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Be The Guy Who Wears A Name Tag Everywhere

Be The Guy Who Wears A Name Tag Everywhere

…or girl.

Be The Guy Who Wears A Name Tag Everywhere

    Scott Ginsberg’s story is that one day after an event at college, he decided to keep his name tag on. What he noticed was he was instantly more approachable the rest of the day.

    Since then Scott has kept the name tag on [for an odd 2400 days], writing a few books on meeting people and running seminars on the subject.

    What’s interesting is the affect this small gesture has had on so many people. Is simply displaying your name a shortcut to networking? Or making new friends?

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    Is the name tag somehow different to just speaking up first and introducing yourself? Scott may well be pioneering the lazy way to meet people. What happens if everyone has name tags? Do we just skip the “What’s your name?” part?

    That’s saving a few seconds at most. So surely the benefit is having more people approach you first.

    However, that’s the problem most people have when meeting people – they won’t make the first move. And as you know, if no one makes the first move, no one moves.

    So right now there are three scenarios with the name tag thing.

    • 1. Everyone wears name tags and we all get along a little easier because we know each other’s names instantly.
    • 2. Everyone wears name tags but won’t approach anyone else because that’s what the name tag is for.

    and the more likely,

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    • 3. It’s just you and a small percentage of the world’s population that puts a name tag on when they leave the house.

    Scenario 3 leaves you in a few positions.

    The first being the one of ridicule and confusion. Either mocked for being so lame or continuously being mistaken as wait staff at parties, you’ll always be just one step away from printing a picture of your face on your shirts or tattooing your name on your chest [see Scott Ginsberg].

    On the other hand, as appears to be true in Scott’s case, you become the life of the party. The guy everyone talks to.

    On a personal and business level, this is a great idea. If more people feel comfortable initiating conversation with you, how much easier is networking?

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    Scott has made a living out of talking about approachability, so there is definitely something to the whole thing.

    What if you’re not the kind of person who can be comfortable with this kind of attention?

    That, I think, could be the interesting part.

    If you already have the kind of personality that welcomes strangers bridging the gap, then the name tag is really just a shortcut. A fun way to meet more people.

    However, if you’re a little less enthusiastic about being this approachable, it might be worth your while still.

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    Think about how you actually become good at talking to people. It’s by practice! The more people you talk to the better you get at talking to people.

    If you’re unable to initiate those interactions, then we might be looking at a great way to get your practice up. You won’t be instantly comfortable doing it, but you’ll instantly become better at it.

    Training wheels for introductions and approachability

    Firstly, I see this as a starting point for anyone who has trouble meeting people. Being forced to interact on this level will make you much more happy to initiate conversation in the future.

    Secondly, being that approachable is a pretty cool thing, but you don’t actually need a name tag to do it. After a while wearing this name tag, I bet you’ll start noticing ways that make you more approachable without anyone reading your name. Subtle changes in body language, vocal tone and personality, for instance.

    Remember, you can always say, “Oh, I just came from a seminar. Thanks for pointing that out. What’s your name?”

    That Guy With A Nametag – [HelloMyNameIsScott]

    More by this author

    Craig Childs

    Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

    How To Start a Conversation with Anyone 8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times How Not To Suck At Socializing – Do’s & Don’ts Ten Ways to Improve Your Quality of Life Storage Ideas For Small Spaces

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    Last Updated on September 17, 2019

    10 Simple Ways To Always Think Positive Thoughts

    10 Simple Ways To Always Think Positive Thoughts

    Positive thinking can lead to a lot of positive change in your life. Developing an optimistic outlook can be good for both your physical and mental health.

    But sometimes, certain situations arise in life that makes it hard to keep a positive outlook. Take steps to make positive thinking become more like your second nature and you’ll reap the biggest benefits.

    Here are 10 ways to make thinking positive thoughts easy:

    1. Spend Time with Positive People

    If you surround yourself with constant complainers, their negativity is likely to rub off on you.

    Spend time with positive friends and family members to increase the likelihood that their positive thinking habits will become yours too. It’s hard to be negative when everyone around you is so positive.

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    2. Take Responsibility for Your Behavior

    When you encounter problems and difficulties in life, don’t play the role of the victim. Acknowledge your role in the situation and take responsibility for your behavior.

    Accepting responsibility can help you learn from mistakes and prevent you from blaming others unfairly.

    3. Contribute to the Community

    One of the best ways to feel good about what you have, is to focus on what you have to give.

    Volunteer in some manner and give back to the community. Helping others can give you a new outlook on the world and can assist you with positive thinking.

    4. Read Positive and Inspirational Materials

    Spend time each day reading something that encourages positive thinking. Read the Bible, spiritual material, or inspirational quotes to help you focus on what’s important to you in life. It can be a great way to start and end your day.

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    Some recommendations for you:

    5. Recognize and Replace Negative Thoughts

    You won’t be successful at positive thinking if you’re still plagued by frequent negative thoughts. Learn to recognize and replace thoughts that are overly negative. Often, thoughts that include words like “always” and “never” signal that they aren’t true.

    If you find yourself thinking something such as, “I always mess everything up,” replace it with something more realistic such as, “Sometimes I make mistakes but I learn from them.”

    There’s no need to make your thoughts unrealistically positive, but instead, make them more realistic.

    6. Establish and Work Toward Goals

    It’s easier to be positive about problems and setbacks when you have goals that you’re working toward. Goals will give you motivation to overcome those obstacles when you encounter problems along the way. Without clear goals, it’s harder to make decisions and gauge your progress.

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    Learn to set SMART goals to help you achieve more.

    7. Consider the Consequences of Negativity

    Spend some time thinking about the consequences of negative thinking. Often, it can become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

    For example, a person who thinks, “I probably won’t get this job interview,” may put less effort into the interview. As a result, he may decrease his chances of getting the job.

    Create a list of all the ways negative thinking impacts your life. It likely influences your behavior, your relationships, and your feelings. Then, create a list of the ways in which positive thinking could be beneficial.

    8. Offer Compliments to Others

    Look for reasons to compliment others. Be genuine in your praise and compliments, but offer it frequently. This will help you look for the good in other people.

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    9. Create a Daily Gratitude List

    If you start keeping a daily gratitude list, you’ll start noticing exactly how much you have to be thankful for. This can help you focus on the positive in your life instead of thinking about all the bad things that have happened in the day.

    Getting in the habit of showing an attitude of gratitude makes positive thinking more of a habit. Here’re 40 Simple Ways To Practice Gratitude.

    10. Practice Self-Care

    Take good care of yourself and you’ll be more equipped to think positively.

    Get plenty of rest and exercise and practice managing your stress well. Taking care of your physical and mental health will provide you with more energy to focus on positive thinking.

    Learn about these 30 Self-Care Habits for a Strong and Healthy Mind, Body and Spirit.

    More About Staying Positive

    Featured photo credit: DESIGNECOLOGIST via unsplash.com

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