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Attend Conferences Without Being There

Attend Conferences Without Being There

There are LOTS of conferences to attend, and only so much time and money to get around. For instance, I wished I could’ve dragged myself down to Austin, Texas to attend South by Southwest Interactive. But my own conference, Video on the Net is next week, and I’m busy.

So this is how I learned how to attend without being there.

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  • Live Flow- Twitter [website]– Add enough friends attending the event, as well as the official event, and you get the flow from this app. Twitter let me see which conferences were being attended by people that matter to me. It let me see which parties were where. It let me know who was hanging out with who afterwards. All of this, by the way, gives the overall sensation of what the event felt like to the people I followed, but also gave me a sense of who might be doing business with whom.
  • Visuals- Flickr [website]– I love seeing who’s there, what’s going on, and how much fun they’re having. Videoblogs can go up fast, but photos are almost instant, thanks to cameraphones and faster turnaround time to process. I just went to Flickr.com, searched on sxsw2007 (and variants), and suddenly got huge photo streams of good pictures from the event.
  • Content- Blogs- Technorati and Google Blogsearch [website] and [website]– If you want to know what was said during the events, count on the great world of liveblogging. How do you find what people have covered in the events? Swing over to technorati.com and blogsearch.google.com , and put in the tags for the event (in my example: sxsw2007). Suddenly, you get the tapestry of the blogosphere’s opinion of the event. I should also mention Techmeme, a site that captures the gestalt of the tech blogosphere, in case that’s the subject matter of your conference. (Similar aggregator sites exist for most industries, so maybe YOU can fill me in on those in the comments?)
  • Content- Videoblogs -Blip, YouTube, Google Video [Blip.tv], [YouTube], [Google Video] – More and more, conferences are being covered by videobloggers. Some conferences have rules about not covering the entire speech (after all, this content is how they make their money- and that’s important). But most of the good events allow some amount of videoblogging and off-stage interviews that help you feel there. Or, events will release all their materials after the fact onto one of the platforms mentioned above so that you can be there after the fact.
  • Content- Podcasts- IT Conversations [website] – For tech conferences, I’ve found that IT Conversations, part of the Gigavox Media network, have some GREAT coverage. I should also mention PodTech, another really great source for interesting conference coverage. You might have some suggestions for the non-tech conference circuit. If so, drop it in the comments, please, for the other lifehack types to get to see.
  • CONTACT- LinkedIN [website]– This step might not be immediately obvious, but once you know the types of people who attended the conference you wished you’d attended, you might want to add these people to your network of contacts one way or another. If you’re using LinkedIN for contacts, consider adding them to your list of contacts. With a little bit of Google sleuthing, or through some other means like their account on Flickr or Twitter, you can usually make contact and ask for a good email address to send a LinkedIN invite. This will help grow your base of like-minded people, should something of interest to discuss arise in the near future. One never knows.

There are lots of other tips I’m sure I’ve missed. I count on you to fill me in on the best stuff. But I’ve used the above to build my awareness of events, to learn some of the choice lessons I couldn’t pay to attend, or didn’t have time to visit. And I’ve found more like-minded people who then give me the buzz on the conference not to miss in the upcoming months, which is also valuable to me. I hope these work out for you. And if you can’t come to Video on the Net in a few weeks, maybe use these tips to follow the action from afar.

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Chris Brogan is Community Developer for Network2 and Video on the Net. He keeps a blog at [chrisbrogan.com].

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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