Advertising
Advertising

Ask the Entrepreneurs: 13 Ways to Make Sense of Your Social Media Feeds Each Day

Ask the Entrepreneurs: 13 Ways to Make Sense of Your Social Media Feeds Each Day


    Ask The Entrepreneurs
    is a regular series where members of those involved in the Young Entrepreneur Council are asked a single question that aims to help Lifehack readers level up their own lives, whether in a area of management, communication, business or life in general.

    Here’s the question posed in this edition of Ask The Entrepreneurs:

    How do you, as a busy entrepreneur, find the time each day to keep up with social media?

    1. Newsflash: I’m Engaged!

    Laura Roeder

      Writing 140-character tweets or replying to a Facebook comment takes minutes — entrepreneurs waste hours on social media when they’re reading, not engaging. Twitter and Facebook were designed to suck you in to click on photo albums, read blog posts, and watch videos, but none of these activities grow your business! Make sure you’re spending your time engaging with, not consuming, social media.

      Laura Roeder, LKR

      2. Take It Personally

        When I’m pressed for time I look for more tasks that I can give to my virtual team that free up space to connect on social media. It’s not about “keeping up” with every post and link but really listening to, sharing with the community to build relationships. That’s not something that can be outsourced, so I’ll hand off other tasks to find the time.

        Kelly AzevedoShe’s Got Systems

        Advertising

        3. Timebox Your Tweets

        Lea Woodward

          Interacting on social media in batches of time helps timebox it and keeps you focused. During that time, using web tools enables you to schedule useful resources to share, and also allows you to space out your interactions and responses so you’re not interacting in one overwhelming stream of activity during that period.

          Lea Woodward, Startup Training School

          4. Check Your Pulse Daily

            Set up time daily to share original content and other articles through news aggregates such as Pulse. Review what your followers are saying so you can connect and look for ways to be of service more effectively.

            Michael BrunyAmbassador Bruny.Com


            5. No Smartphone Necessary

              I connect Twitter to my cell phone — I get text notifications when someone mentions me, and sending a Tweet as a text message is much easier then doing it from the computer or even a phone app. Sending the Tweet via text message is as simple as sending a text to anyone else. It flows easier into my day this way, since I don’t get distracted by my feed.

              Advertising

              Raoul Davis, Ascendant Group

              6. Stick to Your Discipline

                It can be easy to get swept up in social media and, as a result, work less efficiently. Instead of always being on, put aside a couple hours each day to answer emails, tweet things out, respond to @replies, etc. The rest of the time? Close those tabs! You don’t want the temptation. Believe me.

                Steph AuteriWord Nerd Pro


                7. It’s Just Another Part of Communication

                  I need to send out emails, return phone calls and even stick a letter in the mail today. I keep track of all of those things on one list and I keep social media tasks on the same list. Twitter and all the rest are just additional communication tools, and I treat them as such.

                  Thursday Bram, Hyper Modern Consulting


                  8. Set a Social Media Schedule

                    When using social networks, it’s important to set aside time to keep active and be consistent in your posting. Make sure you can use them live in real-time too. Occasionally, some accounts schedule their updates to go out later through TweetDeck on a specific date or time.

                    Advertising

                    Lane Sutton, Social Media from a Teen


                    9. Can’t Beat Buffer

                      Personal and business branding require maintaining active social media profiles, but it is tough to find the time for posting new content as a busy entrepreneur in this 24/7 news cycle. I am indebted to Buffer App; it’s the tool that helps me maintain an active Twitter presence without the headache of babysitting my feed. Use the bookmarklet to add updates to a queue, and let Buffer do the rest!

                      Doreen Bloch, Poshly Inc.

                      10. Let’s Hear It for HootSuite!

                        I use HootSuite to manage all of my networks easily and schedule updates. In just a few clicks, I can send messages across all of my networks, which saves me tons of time.

                        Ben Lang, EpicLaunch



                        11. Integrate, Don’t Interrupt

                          I see social media not as an interruption or something to be scheduled throughout my day, but rather as part of my everyday activities. My setup in the TalentEgg office has a full computer screen devoted to HootSuite so that I can casually stay up-to-date with what’s happening throughout the company’s social media channels.

                          Advertising

                          Lauren Friese, TalentEgg Inc.

                          12. Consistency Is Key

                          Nick Friedman

                            It’s best to delegate that job if possible, so you can be consistent with your postings. If delegation isn’t an option, set aside 10-15 minutes each day (broken up into two or three separate, 5-minute periods) where you focus on posting, tweeting, and responding to social media.

                            Nick Friedman, College Hunks Hauling Junk


                            13. Download Those Mobile Apps

                            John Hall

                              Make it as easy as you possibly can. This means make sure that you have all of the mobile apps. Have these apps be the first ones you see when you touch your phone. Most people look at their phone quite frequently when they have down time. The more you are reminded to post, the more time you will make.

                              John Hall, Digital Talent Agents

                              How do you make sense of your social media feeds each day? Let us know in the comments below!

                              (Photo credit: Social Media Button on a Keyboard via Shutterstock)

                                More by this author

                                9 No-Brainer Ways to Track Employee Time Ask the Entrepreneurs: 12 Things Entrepreneurs Should Stop Doing Ask the Entrepreneurs: 9 Best Note Taking Tools Ask the Entrepreneurs: 12 Tips for Mastering Public Speaking Ask the Entrepreneurs: 9 Tasks You Should be Outsourcing

                                Trending in Communication

                                1 Practical Advice for Overcoming Problems in INFP Relationships 2 How to Live up to Your Full Potential and Succeed in Life 3 7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience 4 5 Steps to Master Networking Skills and Perfect Your Personal Branding 5 The Real Causes of Lack of Energy That Go Beyond Your Physical Health

                                Read Next

                                Advertising
                                Advertising

                                Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                                7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                                7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                                When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                                You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                                1. Connecting them with each other

                                Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

                                Advertising

                                It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                                2. Connect with their emotions

                                Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                                For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

                                Advertising

                                3. Keep going back to the beginning

                                Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                                On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                                4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                                After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

                                Advertising

                                Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                                5. Entertain them

                                While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                                Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

                                Advertising

                                6. Appeal to loyalty

                                Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                                In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                                7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                                Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                                Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

                                Read Next