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And the Survey says?

And the Survey says?

As my regular readers know by now, one of the things I write and speak on most is value alignment. Nearly all companies will proudly tell you about the value statements they have, and nearly everyone will agree that businesses should be values centered in their mission. However, nearly all have to work much harder on the practical application of their values so they truly take actions which are consistent with the beliefs they profess to have.

In my coaching practice, I consistently give the different companies I work with reality checks on if their values spoken are their values practiced. We take a clear look at their operations and work processes to see if they pass muster according to how they interpret the values they claim to have. One of my favorite targets? The employee opinion survey.

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Leaders will tell me they have an open door policy, that everyone is encouraged to give honest feedback, and that they do everything possible to create a safe environment in which people will do so, communicating freely and without any fear of repercussion. They say there are good relationships throughout the workplace, and that morale is high. Yet they still will persist in using anonymous employee opinion surveys so that employees will “tell it like it is,” and so they can periodically discover “what is really going on,” and “how people may truly feel.”

Doesn’t quite compute, does it.

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I get pretty bullish in my insistence that employee opinion surveys (and any kind of anonymous feedback forms) become completely unnecessary if managers consistently practice the Daily 5 Minutes to promote healthy, forthright and enjoyably engaging communication throughout the workplace. However despite the pain they potentially can cause, many leaders will in turn insist they still want to use surveys to shed light on any corners of darkness which linger. In particular, I can understand why companies in an acquisition or transition of some kind find them useful, however the norm is that not enough care is employed in the manner in which they are used.

If you must use them, please give considerable thought to the process. My biggest objection to employee opinion surveys is that by nature the communication is one way, and when anonymous need not be substantiated or clarified. It is a fallacy to assume that the feedback you are getting is a totally honest representation because it is seldom complete, even when comments are coming from employees with the most positive attitudes and good intentions. Understand you still have to read between the lines, or somehow employ a follow-up process in which you can get closer to the truth and uncover root causes for pervasive opinions.

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Construct your surveys carefully. The better ones I have seen do not ask questions about the work performance of peers, managers or leaders (for those questions invite witch hunts and unrealistic comparisons). Instead, they seek to educate, and question for understanding on company values, mission, and strategic objectives. They ask about the tools people feel they might need to get the job done better. They ask for ideas on how to serve the customer. They ask for suggestions beyond mere comments, and all participants understand they are expected to be part of the solution when they reveal issues.

Be timely with your follow-up process, and seek to validate the thought and effort which has been shared, however make it clear that the survey is just one part of on-going efforts to create a vibrant and dynamic workplace— and that everyone’s involvement is necessary.

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Article References:
The Daily Five Minutes
Hey boss, what do you want to know?

Rosa Say is the author of Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business and the Talking Story blog. She is also the founder and head coach of Say Leadership Coaching, a company dedicated to bringing nobility to the working arts of management and leadership.

Rosa’s Previous Thursday Column was: The First Time versus the Insider’s Advantage.

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Last Updated on February 13, 2019

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

Think being happy is something that happens as a result of luck, circumstance, having money, etc.? Think again.

Happiness is a mindset. And if you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then check out these 10 things happy people do differently.

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. -Dalai Lama

1. Happy people find balance in their lives.

Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t. Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much time thinking about what they don’t have. Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they make time for all the things that are important to them, whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc.

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2. Happy people abide by the golden rule.

You know that saying you heard when you were a kid, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” Well, happy people truly embody this principle. They treat others with respect. They’re sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of other people. They’re compassionate. And they get treated this way (most of the time) in return.

3. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff.

One of the biggest things happy people do differently compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. Bad things happen to good people sometimes. Happy people realize this, are able to take things in stride, and move on. Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness, guilt, resentment, greed, and anger.

4. Happy people take responsibility for their actions.

Happy people aren’t perfect, and they’re well aware of that. When they screw up, they admit it. They recognize their faults and work to improve on them. Unhappy people tend to blame others and always find an excuse why things aren’t going their way. Happy people, on the other hand, live by the mantra:

“There are two types of people in the world: those that do and those that make excuses why they don’t.”

5. Happy people surround themselves with other happy people.

happiness surrounding

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they tend to hang out with other happy people. Misery loves company, and unhappy people gravitate toward others who share their negative sentiments. If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression, worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest friends or family members. Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs off on you.

    6. Happy people are honest with themselves and others.

    People who are happy often exhibit the virtues of honesty and trustworthiness. They would rather give you candid feedback, even when the truth hurts, and they expect the same in return. Happy people respect people who give them an honest opinion.

    7. Happy people show signs of happiness.

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    smile

      This one may sound obvious but it’s a key differentiator between happy and unhappy people. Think about your happiest friends. Chances are, the mental image you form is of them smiling, laughing, and appearing genuinely happy. On the flip side, those who aren’t happy tend to look the part. Their posture may be slouched and you may perceive a lack of confidence.

      8. Happy people are passionate.

      Another thing happy people have in common is their ability to find their passions in life and pursue those passions to the fullest. Happy people have found what they’re looking for, and they spend their time doing what they love.

      9. Happy people see challenges as opportunities.

      Folks who are happy accept challenges and use them as opportunities to learn and grow. They turn negatives into positives and make the best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t dwell on things that are out of their control; rather, they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming obstacles.

      10. Happy people live in the present.

      While unhappy people tend to dwell on the past and worry about the future, happy people live in the moment. They are grateful for “the now” and focus their efforts on living life to the fullest in the present. Their philosophy is:

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      There’s a reason it’s called “the present.” Because life is a gift.

      So if you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your life, think about the 10 principles above and how you can use them to make yourself better.

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