⌄ Scroll down to continue ⌄

7 Lightweight Contact Management Tips

⌄ Scroll down to continue ⌄
7 Lightweight Contact Management Tips

I’m using Gmail’s built-in contact application to run my contact management. (By the way, did you see that you can use Gmail and Calendar and Chat on your own site now, configured for your own domain?) Though there are some things I can’t use Google to do easily (mail merge types of things), there are lots of ways that I use the Contact portion of the application that might not have come to mind for you right away.

⌄ Scroll down to continue reading article ⌄

⌄ Scroll down to continue reading article ⌄
  1. Add Birthdays– I put birthdays into the contact section as well as in Google Calendar
  2. Their Needs– You often get emails from someone saying, “Know anyone who’s good at Typepad?” (btw, do you?). I put those against the person’s contact name, so that I can remember who needed what, and to ask if the person’s solved that need, if some time has passed.
  3. Kids’ Names– I’m really good with names, but that rarely extends to everyone’s kids, their ages, etc. So I plug that into the Contacts page, so I can remember to ask the person. Ditto family, spouse, pet scorpion, etc.
  4. Add their personal blog– Before I make a connection with with someone I haven’t contacted in a while, I check in on their blog first. It’s like peering in the curtains before going in. I find this very useful. The one time I didn’t follow this tip, it was devastating! No details, but I came off seeming REALLY insensitive.
  5. Roles– You always hear about a job opening, and then never remember who matches that role. Keep their roles updated so you can plumb it when needed.
  6. Favorites– My favorite food is leftovers. I like sci fi and action movies. I don’t go to many live concerts. Note these things for your contacts, if you know them.
  7. Read below the line– When you click on a contact in Gmail, it gives you the list of emails between you and that person (provided you’ve kept them, which I’ve started doing). This gives you a sense of the thread of your conversations. Take a browse of these from time to time and consider the theme of what you’re reading. Is this person helpful? Should you talk more with them? Do they often have great advice? Or worse, are they sucking your life away, one email at a time? Use this tactic to consider things often.

I’ve got some more thoughts around email, but let’s leave this as a list about contact management. What are some of yours? How can you grow this list of tips?

⌄ Scroll down to continue reading article ⌄

⌄ Scroll down to continue reading article ⌄

–Chris Brogan is thinking a lot about things at Grasshopper Factory. His personal blog is [chrisbrogan.com]

⌄ Scroll down to continue reading article ⌄
⌄ Scroll down to continue reading article ⌄

More by this author

7 Uses for a Virtual Machine
7 Uses for a Virtual Machine
When Emailing Think Press Release
Mail, BrainDump, Mail, Do
Stretch Goals Matter
You Had me at Insane

Trending in Communication

1 21 Happy Quotes About the Meaning of True Happiness 2 How to Start Living in the Moment and Stop Worrying 3 Online Dating as a Single Parent: How to Get Responses 4 Empathy VS Sympathy: What Are The Key Differences? 5 5 Signs You May Be a People Pleaser and How To Stop

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Explore the Full Life Framework

Advertising
Advertising