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7 Golden Rules of Writing and Editing: A Non-grammar-focused Guide to Irresistible Writing

7 Golden Rules of Writing and Editing: A Non-grammar-focused Guide to Irresistible Writing
    Photo by jjpacres' on flickr

    For the longest time, I was too scared to publish anything on my blog.

    I had the debilitating fear of making a mistake – a simple error. What if somebody catches my mistake, corrects it and lets the world know? I would agonize over this problem. I thought my credibility as a Business Writer would be shot to pieces.

    When you write, you constantly feel the pressure of mastering the art of using commas. You are required to understand the difference between a colon and a semi one, the misplaced modifier, and the rules on splitting the infinitive. Really, who has a brain to for that? Not me, for sure.

    Do we really need to go back to school and learn grammar and punctuation all over again? Do we really need to take writing classes to understand the basics of forming intelligent sentences?

    No and no. You need to do these things but you don’t necessarily have to go back to a classroom setting.

    Here is a list of 7 rules that will help you to revise and edit your work painlessly – or at least with the least amount of it.

    1. Make a good first impression

    What is the most interesting bit or angle about your writing? Clue the reader in early and don’t bury the introduction in the body of the text.

    If you lose your reader at this stage, there is no point to your writing. You might as well stop wasting your time as well as the reader’s.

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    2. Write to express, not to impress

    Why is it that you are writing, again? Is it to make a point or to show off your literary prowess?

    Always write so that everything is clearly understood.

    Use simple words. Use the first word that comes to your mind as that will often work best.

    Don’t look up fancy words in thesaurus as you go – write naturally. The only way you can get a better understanding of language is through your reading habit. Read more to increase your vocabulary organically.

    Avoid clichés and jargon. Think outside the box.

    3. Be specific – it won’t kill you

    Use short sentences. Use clear sentences. Pay attention to structure and craft sentences that inform or even entertain your readers.

    Use short paragraphs. Connect them in a logical, seamless flow. For every new idea you explore, start a new one.

    Write in the active voice – this will make the most difference to your writing.

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    In active voice, the subject performs the action – it is the most direct, straightforward way to write.

    “The dog chased by the boy.” This is passive.

    “The boy chased the dog.” This more direct. Remember to use active voice whenever possible. Passive voice is usually slow and boring, and often doesn’t fully convey the message.

    Often, the sentence becomes shorter as well. Writing in the active voice will make it much easier for you to stick to the text guidelines.

    Try using strong verbs for action, be bold.

    “She did the crime so she could pay for the jewellery.” Weak.

    “She stole from her Mum so she could splurge on the jewellery.” Much better.

    4. Reign over pesky punctuation and grim grammar

    Make sure full stops, commas, apostrophes and dashes are in their proper places. Do the best you can and then move on.

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    Check for spelling and grammar. Remember to use spell check as well as your eyes.

    Read for style. Make sure it is consistent throughout.

    5. If in doubt, leave it out

    Is there anything that really worries you? It’s much better to take it out now than to have regrets later.

    Brevity is the secret of good writing. Do not waste words, do tight editing where every word means something. Avoid unnecessary words.

    As Stephen King has said famously (and not famously said – remember not to split the infinitive),

    Kill your darlings.

    Do not get attached to your sentences.

    Edit, edit, edit. Anything that doesn’t make sense, anything that doesn’t sound right to your ears; kill it. Go on, be brave and kill your darlings now.

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    6. Pay attention to the boring bits

    Do attribute all quotations and allegations to someone. Check that the text does not defame anyone or breach copyright.

    Make sure the length of your copy is appropriate. If you need to cut, cut from the bottom. That usually works well.

    When you are satisfied you have edited the copy to the highest standard, read it again.

    7. The Final Read – One More Time

    You must become a tough editor of all text, even if it takes significant time and effort. Check and check again to see your basic ingredients are correct.

    Read aloud – one last time.

    While fear of imperfection should not stop you from writing, not educating yourself is not good enough of an excuse.

    Learn, write and most of all, have fun along the way. You will find many people supporting you, because they themselves have been caught in the act, in this case, publishing their work with a typo.

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    Marya Jan

    Facebook Ad Strategist

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    Last Updated on June 24, 2019

    Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

    Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

    A study [1] published in Depression and Anxiety found that social media users are more likely to be depressed. This was just one of the huge number of studies linking social media and depression[2] . But why exactly do platforms like Facebook and Instagram make people so unhappy? Well, we don’t know yet for sure, but there are some explanations.

    Social Media Could Lead to Depression

    Depression is a serious medical condition that affects how you think, feel, and behave. Social media may lead to depression in predisposed individuals or make existing symptoms of depression[3] worse explains[4] the study above’s senior author Dr. Brian Primack. So, the problem may not be in social media per se, but how we use it.

    Signs You’re Suffering From “Social Media Depression”

    If you feel like social media is having a negative impact on your mood, then you may be suffering from “social media depression.” Look for symptoms like:

    • low self-esteem,

    • negative self-talk,

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    • a low mood,

    • irritability,

    • a lack of interest in activities once enjoyed,

    • and social withdrawal.

    If you’ve had these symptoms for more than two weeks and if this is how you feel most of the time, then you are likely depressed. Although “social media depression “is not a term recognized in the medical setting, social media depression seems to be a real phenomenon affecting around 50% of social media users. As explained in a review study[5] published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, if a person has a certain predisposition to depression and other mental disorders, social media use may only worsen their mental health.

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    Social Media Could Crush Self-Esteem

    We know that social media and depression are in some way linked, but why is this so? Well, according to Igor Pantic, MD, Ph.D.[6], social media use skews your perception about other people’s lives and traits. To explain this further, most people like to portray an idealized image of their lives, personal traits, and appearance on sites like Facebook and Instagram. If you confuse this idealized image with reality, you may be under the false impression that everyone is better than you which can crush your self-esteem and lead to depression. This is especially true for teens and young adults who are more likely to compare themselves to others. If you already suffer from low self-esteem, the illusion that everyone has it better off than you will just make you feel worse.

    Causing Social Isolation and Other Negative Emotions

    Another commonly cited reason for the negative impact of social media on mental health is its link with social isolation. Depressed people are more likely to isolate themselves socially and chose only to interact indirectly through social media platforms. But communication online tends to be superficial and is lacking when compared to real-life interaction explains Panic. What this means is not that social media leads to isolation but the other way around, possibly explaining why we find so many depressed persons on these sites.

    Lastly, social media use may generate negative emotions in you like envy, jealousy, dislike, loneliness, and many others and this may worsen your depressive symptoms.

    Why We Need to Take This Seriously

    Both depression and social media use are on the rise according to epidemiological studies. Since each one has an impact on the other, we have to start thinking of healthier ways to use social media. Teens and young adults are especially vulnerable to the negative impact of social media on mental health.

    Advice on Social Media Use

    Although these findings did not provide any cause-effect explanation regarding Facebook and depression[7], they still do prove that social media use may not be a good way to handle depression. For this reason, the leading authors of these studies gave some suggestions as to how clinicians and people can make use of such findings.

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    One suggestion is that clinicians should ask patients about their social media habits. Then they can advise them on how to change their outlook on social media use or even suggest limiting their time spent on social media.

    Some social media users may also exhibit addictive behavior; they may spend too much time due to compulsive urges. Any compulsive behavior is bound to lead to feelings of guilt which can worsen depressive symptoms.

    Having Unhealthy Relationship with Social Media

    If you feel like your relationship with social media is unhealthy, then consider the advice on healthy social media use provided by psychology experts from Links Psychology[8]:

    Avoid negative social comparison – always keep in mind that how people portray themselves and their lives on social media is not a realistic picture, but rather an idealized one. Also, avoid comparing yourself to others because this behavior can lead to negative self-talk.

    Remember that social media is not a replacement for real life – Social media is great for staying in touch and having fun, but it should never replace real-world interactions.

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    Avoid releasing personal information – For your safety and privacy, make sure to be careful with what you post online.

    Report users who bully and harass you – It’s easy to be a bully in the anonymous and distant world of social media. Don’t take such offense personally and report those who abuse social media to harass others.

    The bits of advice listed above can help you establish a healthy relationship with social media. Always keep these things in mind to avoid losing an objective perspective of what social media is and how it is different from real life. If you are currently suffering from depression, talk to your doctor about what is bothering you so that you can get the treatment you need to get better. Tell your doctor about your social media use and see if they could give you some advice on this topic.

    Reference

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