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20 Motivational Quotes about Life that Lead to True Happiness

20 Motivational Quotes about Life that Lead to True Happiness

Don’t you just love an inspiring quote? Quotes are not just interesting tidbits of wisdom and inspiration, but if we really pay attention to the wisdom they have to offer, if we take the time to truly digest it, absorb it and hopefully act upon it, it can actually make a real difference in the experience of our lives. Why not learn from the wisdom of others who have found their paths to “True Happiness?”

Here are some of my favorite inspirational Happiness quotes about life.

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” – Mahatma Gandhi

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    “Most folks are as happy as they make up their minds to be.” ― Abraham Lincoln

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      “Often people attempt to live their lives backwards; they try to have more things, or more money, in order to do more of what they want, so they will be happier.  The way it actually works is the reverse.  You must first be who you really are, then do what you need to do, in order to have what you want.” – Margaret Young

      often-people-attempt-to-live-their-lives

        “We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have.”- Frederick Keonig

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          ”I am determined to be cheerful and happy in whatever situation I may find myself. For I have learned that the greater part of our misery or unhappiness is determined not by our circumstance but by our disposition.”- Martha Washington

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            “True happiness comes from the joy of deeds well done, the zest of creating things new. ‘ – Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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              “Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits. – Thomas Jefferson

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                “The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts: therefore, guard accordingly, and take care that you entertain no notions unsuitable to virtue and reasonable nature. – Marcus Aurelius

                the-happiness-of-your-life-depends-upon

                  “There is only one way to happiness and that is to cease worrying about things which are beyond the power of our will.” – Epictetus

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                    “True happiness is… to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future.” – Lucius Annaeus Seneca

                    true-happiness-is-to-enjoy-the-present

                      “True happiness… is not attained through self-gratification, but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.” – Helen Keller

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                        “Happiness exists on earth, and it is won through prudent exercise of reason, knowledge of the harmony of the universe, and constant practice of generosity.” – Jose Marti

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                          “Happiness is the consequence of personal effort. You fight for it, strive for it, insist upon it, and sometimes even travel around the world looking for it. You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestations of your own blessings. And once you have achieved a state of happiness, you must never become lax about maintaining it. You must make a mighty effort to keep swimming upward into that happiness forever, to stay afloat on top of it.” ― Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat, Pray, Love

                          happiness-is-the-consequence-of-personal-effort

                            “Rules for Happiness: Something to do, Someone to love, Something to hope for.” ― Immanuel Kant

                            rules-for-happiness-something-to-do-someone

                              “The secret of happiness is to admire without desiring.” – Carl Sandburg

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                                “Happiness cannot be traveled to, owned, earned, worn or consumed.  Happiness is the spiritual experience of living every minute with love, grace and gratitude.” – Denis Waitley

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                                  “Happiness is not a state to arrive at, but a manner of traveling.” – Margaret Lee Runbeck

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                                    “My happiness grows in direct proportion to my acceptance, and in inverse proportion to my expectations.”  – Michael J. Fox

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                                      “Satisfaction of one’s curiosity is one of the greatest sources of happiness in life.” – Linus Pauling

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                                        “The art of living does not consist in preserving and clinging to a particular mode of happiness, but in allowing happiness to change its form without being disappointed by the change; happiness, like a child, must be allowed to grow up.” – Charles L. Morgan

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                                          Though finding, or perhaps more accurately, experiencing our own “True Happiness,” is up to us, we can certainly find inspiration in the thoughts, words and lives of others to help us along our journey.

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                                          The Gentle Art of Saying No

                                          The Gentle Art of Saying No

                                          No!

                                          It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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                                          But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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                                          What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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                                          But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

                                          1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
                                          2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
                                          3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
                                          4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
                                          5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
                                          6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
                                          7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
                                          8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
                                          9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
                                          10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

                                          Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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