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20 Inspirational Superhuman Moments From Formula One

20 Inspirational Superhuman Moments From Formula One

Formula One is the pinnacle of motorsport, a high intensity world renowned for its demanding physical and emotional stresses. Highly respected F1 journalist Christopher Hilton noted in the 2001 documentary Going Critical, “Motor racing at its very highest level is the most extreme form of human endeavor, outside of war.” In the face of constant danger, the drivers corner in excess of 150mph and endure up to 3.5 G forces throughout each Grand Prix. They teach us we can aspire to anything, and with determination we can achieve our goals.

The sport’s technology also impacts on the global road car industry. The efforts of the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) has seen safety features developed within F1 taken to the cars we drive, saving thousands of lives daily. It’s a remarkable sport, and the exploits within have inspired hundreds of millions of fans. Here are 20 moments which can, hopefully, inspire you to great things this summer.

1. Ayrton Senna’s quest for perfection – Monaco 1988

During the 1988 Monaco Grand Prix Senna became so committed he entered a trancelike state – his brilliance was such he built a 55 second lead. He crashed when his team radioed him to slow down, and was so humbled by his mistake he hid in his Monaco apartment for days afterwards.

2. Senna’s emotional home win – Brazil 1991

http://youtu.be/8GgWhL7vh9M

Jammed in 5th gear whilst facing rain, Senna held it together for an emotional first home win. You can watch the award winning 2010 documentary Senna to learn more about his inspirational life; the Brazilian was as well known for his charity work as he was for his driving.

3. Nigel Mansell offers Senna a lift – Silverstone 1991

Having already lost the race to championship rival Mansell, Senna’s McLaren was forced to retire on the last lap. Mansell promptly stopped to offer the Brazilian a lift back to the pits, creating iconic imagery of the rivals united.

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4. Gilles Villeneue’s legacy

http://youtu.be/Ro6IB-C288s

This fitting tribute from Sky Sports to the legendary Gilles Villeneuve highlight’s the French Canadian’s humble genius and natural talent.

5. Gilles Villeneuve’s determination – Zandvoort 1979

http://youtu.be/9ZuZ-pcobCM

A famous incident which showcases Villeneuve’s fighting spirit. After a puncture ruined his race, he refused to give up.

6. Niki Lauda overcomes a fiery crash – Nuburgring 1976

As depicted in the 2013 film Rush (which he officially sanctioned), Lauda suffered a horrendous fiery accident at the Nurburgring in 1976. He overcame his near death experience with lifelong scars, but was back in his Ferrari a mere six weeks after his crash.

7. Mika Hakkinen passes Michael Scumacher – Spa 2000

http://youtu.be/-eE3gCy5zvM

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The world champions went head to head at Spa Francorchamps in 2000, with Hakkinen performing a heroic move to take the lead on one of F1’s most dangerous circuits.

8. Rubens Barrichello’s emotional first win – Hockenheim 2000

http://youtu.be/nBDOV4ihAI8

Following problems in qualifying, Barrichello started 18th in his Ferrari. During a dramatic race, he rose through the field to take the first Brazilian win since Ayrton Senna. A deeply personal moment, his reaction is wonderful to see.

9. Kimi Raikkonen wins from 17th – Suzuka 2005

2007 Finnish World Champion Raikkonen wasted no time in moving up the order. In the closing stages he was able to take the lead on the final lap for a historic win.

10. Michael Schumacher’s genius – Spain 1996

In a substandard Ferrari, Schumacher nonetheless dominated the rain soaked Spanish Grand Prix to take his first win for Ferrari. His genius is well documented here. Schumacher was another driver who contributed vast amounts to charity work. Currently overcoming a severe head injury, the world wishes him a strong recovery.

11. Jim Clark’s legacy

Clark was renowned for his clinical driving style and humble nature, as British commentator Murray Walker recalls here.

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12. Jackie Stewart at the Nurburgring

The three times World Champion demonstrates, vividly, how terrifying the 14 mile Nurburgring circuit was in the 1970s. The circuit was nicknamed “The Green Hell”.

13. Francois Cevert – “The Most Exciting Man in France”

The dashing Cevert endeared himself to everyone, and over 40 years after his tragic fatal accident he is fondly remembered by the F1 community. Despite his brief life he achieved a great deal, living his life to the full and leaving behind a, frustratingly, unfulfilled legacy.

14. Lewis Hamilton wins his first World Championship – Brazil 2008

During an exceptionally tense race, Hamilton and Felipe Massa fought for the title. It all came down to the final few seconds, with Massa charmingly magnanimous in defeat.

15. Juan Manuel Fangio – Monaco 1950s

This remarkable footage shows the Argentinian legend onboard at the famous Monaco principality. Open cockpits, no seatbelts, and goggle visors. Extraordinarily dangerous, but a combination of incredible skill and bravery assisted the drivers of this era.

16. Alex Zanardi remarkable recovery

Zanardi was unsuccessful in F1, but won titles in American motorsport. He suffered a terrible crash in a CART race in late 2001 in which he lost his legs. Despite nearly dying, he has since overcome all obstacles and returned to racing. He even won a Gold medal at the 2012 London Paralympics. He wrote about his traumatic experience in his autobiography.

17. Professor Sid Watkins’ Services To Safety

The renowned neurosurgeon Sid Watkins was drafted into F1 in the 1970s to improve safety. His extensive work with the FIA has gone beyond F1 and impacted enormously on the road car industry, improving car safety the world over. His work continues to save many millions of lives each year. His book, Life on the Limit, details his inspirational work in F1.

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18. Jenson Button wins – Montreal 2011

Having endured a nightmare of a race, in the closing stages McLaren star Button surged up the order and was able to take the lead on the final lap. This fitting montage from the BBC’s coverage highlights a classic Grand Prix; an example to all of us to never give up.

19. The bizarre 1982 Monaco GP

A chaotic final few laps defined the very best of Formula One at Monte Carlo. A light downpour of rain tested the world’s best drivers to the limit, with dramatic results.

20. F1 in London – 2004

England’s capital was closed off in 2004 for an F1 demonstration run (including a dash through Piccadilly Circus). 500,000 people lined the streets to see the exceptional technology in action, a vivid demonstration of F1’s ability to inspire.

This website is unofficial and is not associated in any way with the Formula One group of companies. F1, FORMULA ONE, FORMULA 1, FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, GRAND PRIX and related marks are trade marks of Formula One Licensing B.V.

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Last Updated on December 10, 2019

5 Smart Reasons to Start Journal Writing Today

5 Smart Reasons to Start Journal Writing Today

Here’s the truth: your effectiveness at life is not what it could be. You’re missing out.

Each day passes by and you have nothing to prove that it even happened. Did you achieve something? Go on a date? Have an emotional breakthrough? Who knows?

But what you do know is that you don’t want to make the same mistakes that you’ve made in the past.

Our lives are full of hidden gems of knowledge and insight, and the most recent events in our lives contain the most useful gems of all. Do you know why? It’s simple, those hidden lessons are the most up to date, meaning they have the largest impact on what we’re doing right now.

But the question is, how do you get those lessons? There’s a simple way to do it, and it doesn’t involve time machines:

Journal writing.

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Improved mental clarity, the ability to see our lives in the big picture, as well as serving as a piece of evidence cataloguing every success we’ve ever had; we are provided all of the above and more by doing some journal writing.

Journal writing is a useful and flexible tool to help shed light on achieving your goals.

Here’s 5 smart reasons why you should do journal writing:

1. Journals Help You Have a Better Connection with Your Values, Emotions, and Goals

By journaling about what you believe in, why you believe it, how you feel, and what your goals are, you understand your relationships with these things better. This is because you must sort through the mental clutter and provide details on why you do what you do and feel what you feel.

Consider this:

Perhaps you’ve spent the last year or so working at a job you don’t like. It would be easy to just suck it up and keep working with your head down, going on as if it’s supposed to be normal to not like your job. Nobody else is complaining, so why should you, right?

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But a little journal writing will set things straight for you. You don’t like your job. You feel like it’s robbing you of happiness and satisfaction, and you don’t see yourself better there in the future.

The other workers? Maybe they don’t know, maybe they don’t care. But you do, you know and care enough to do something about it. And you’re capable of fixing this problem because your journal writing allows you to finally be honest with yourself about it.

2. Journals Improve Mental Clarity and Help Improve Your Focus

If there’s one thing journal writing is good for, it’s clearing the mental clutter.

How does it work? Simply, whenever you have a problem and write about it in a journal, you transfer the problem from your head to the paper. This empties the mind, allowing allocation of precious resources to problem-solving rather than problem-storing.

Let’s say you’ve been juggling several tasks at work. You’ve got data entry, testing, e-mails, problems with the boss, and so on—enough to overwhelm you—but as you start journal writing, things become clearer and easier to understand: Data entry can actually wait till Thursday; Bill kindly offered earlier to do my testing; For e-mails, I can check them now; the boss is just upset because Becky called in sick, etc.

You become better able to focus and reason your tasks out, and this is an indispensable and useful skill to have.

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3. Journals Improve Insight and Understanding

As a positive consequence of improving your mental clarity, you become more open to insights you may have missed before. As you write your notes out, you’re essentially having a dialogue with yourself. This draws out insights that you would have missed otherwise; it’s almost as if two people are working together to better understand each other. This kind of insight is only available to the person who has taken the time to connect with and understand themselves in the form of writing.

Once you’ve gotten a few entries written down, new insights can be gleaned from reading over them. What themes do you see in your life? Do you keep switching goals halfway through? Are you constantly dating the same type of people who aren’t good for you? Have you slowly but surely pushed people out of your life for fear of being hurt?

All of these questions can be answered by simply self-reflecting, but you can only discover the answers if you’ve captured them in writing. These questions are going to be tough to answer without a journal of your actions and experiences.

4. Journals Track Your Overall Development

Life happens, and it can happen fast. Sometimes we don’t take the time to stop and look around at what’s happening to us at each moment. We don’t get to see the step-by-step progress that we’re making in our own lives. So what happens? One day it’s the future, and you have no idea how you’ve gotten there.

Journal writing allows you to see how you’ve changed over time, so you can see where you did things right, and you can see where you took a misstep and fell.

The great thing about journals is that you’ll know what that misstep was, and you can make sure it doesn’t happen again—all because you made sure to log it, allowing yourself to learn from your mistakes.

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5. Journals Facilitate Personal Growth

The best thing about journal writing is that no matter what you end up writing about, it’s hard to not grow from it. You can’t just look at a past entry in which you acted shamefully and say “that was dumb, anyway!” No, we say “I will never make a dumb choice like that again!”

It’s impossible not to grow when it comes to journal writing. That’s what makes journal writing such a powerful tool, whether it’s about achieving goals, becoming a better person, or just general personal-development. No matter what you use it for, you’ll eventually see yourself growing as a person.

Kickstart Journaling

How can journaling best be of use to you? To vent your emotions? To help achieve your goals? To help clear your mind? What do you think makes journaling such a useful life skill?

Know the answer? Then it’s about time you reap the benefits of journal writing and start putting pen to paper.

Here’s what you can do to start journaling:

Featured photo credit: Jealous Weekends via unsplash.com

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