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20 Inspirational Superhuman Moments From Formula One

20 Inspirational Superhuman Moments From Formula One

Formula One is the pinnacle of motorsport, a high intensity world renowned for its demanding physical and emotional stresses. Highly respected F1 journalist Christopher Hilton noted in the 2001 documentary Going Critical, “Motor racing at its very highest level is the most extreme form of human endeavor, outside of war.” In the face of constant danger, the drivers corner in excess of 150mph and endure up to 3.5 G forces throughout each Grand Prix. They teach us we can aspire to anything, and with determination we can achieve our goals.

The sport’s technology also impacts on the global road car industry. The efforts of the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) has seen safety features developed within F1 taken to the cars we drive, saving thousands of lives daily. It’s a remarkable sport, and the exploits within have inspired hundreds of millions of fans. Here are 20 moments which can, hopefully, inspire you to great things this summer.

1. Ayrton Senna’s quest for perfection – Monaco 1988

During the 1988 Monaco Grand Prix Senna became so committed he entered a trancelike state – his brilliance was such he built a 55 second lead. He crashed when his team radioed him to slow down, and was so humbled by his mistake he hid in his Monaco apartment for days afterwards.

2. Senna’s emotional home win – Brazil 1991

http://youtu.be/8GgWhL7vh9M

Jammed in 5th gear whilst facing rain, Senna held it together for an emotional first home win. You can watch the award winning 2010 documentary Senna to learn more about his inspirational life; the Brazilian was as well known for his charity work as he was for his driving.

3. Nigel Mansell offers Senna a lift – Silverstone 1991

Having already lost the race to championship rival Mansell, Senna’s McLaren was forced to retire on the last lap. Mansell promptly stopped to offer the Brazilian a lift back to the pits, creating iconic imagery of the rivals united.

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4. Gilles Villeneue’s legacy

http://youtu.be/Ro6IB-C288s

This fitting tribute from Sky Sports to the legendary Gilles Villeneuve highlight’s the French Canadian’s humble genius and natural talent.

5. Gilles Villeneuve’s determination – Zandvoort 1979

http://youtu.be/9ZuZ-pcobCM

A famous incident which showcases Villeneuve’s fighting spirit. After a puncture ruined his race, he refused to give up.

6. Niki Lauda overcomes a fiery crash – Nuburgring 1976

As depicted in the 2013 film Rush (which he officially sanctioned), Lauda suffered a horrendous fiery accident at the Nurburgring in 1976. He overcame his near death experience with lifelong scars, but was back in his Ferrari a mere six weeks after his crash.

7. Mika Hakkinen passes Michael Scumacher – Spa 2000

http://youtu.be/-eE3gCy5zvM

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The world champions went head to head at Spa Francorchamps in 2000, with Hakkinen performing a heroic move to take the lead on one of F1’s most dangerous circuits.

8. Rubens Barrichello’s emotional first win – Hockenheim 2000

http://youtu.be/nBDOV4ihAI8

Following problems in qualifying, Barrichello started 18th in his Ferrari. During a dramatic race, he rose through the field to take the first Brazilian win since Ayrton Senna. A deeply personal moment, his reaction is wonderful to see.

9. Kimi Raikkonen wins from 17th – Suzuka 2005

2007 Finnish World Champion Raikkonen wasted no time in moving up the order. In the closing stages he was able to take the lead on the final lap for a historic win.

10. Michael Schumacher’s genius – Spain 1996

In a substandard Ferrari, Schumacher nonetheless dominated the rain soaked Spanish Grand Prix to take his first win for Ferrari. His genius is well documented here. Schumacher was another driver who contributed vast amounts to charity work. Currently overcoming a severe head injury, the world wishes him a strong recovery.

11. Jim Clark’s legacy

Clark was renowned for his clinical driving style and humble nature, as British commentator Murray Walker recalls here.

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12. Jackie Stewart at the Nurburgring

The three times World Champion demonstrates, vividly, how terrifying the 14 mile Nurburgring circuit was in the 1970s. The circuit was nicknamed “The Green Hell”.

13. Francois Cevert – “The Most Exciting Man in France”

The dashing Cevert endeared himself to everyone, and over 40 years after his tragic fatal accident he is fondly remembered by the F1 community. Despite his brief life he achieved a great deal, living his life to the full and leaving behind a, frustratingly, unfulfilled legacy.

14. Lewis Hamilton wins his first World Championship – Brazil 2008

During an exceptionally tense race, Hamilton and Felipe Massa fought for the title. It all came down to the final few seconds, with Massa charmingly magnanimous in defeat.

15. Juan Manuel Fangio – Monaco 1950s

This remarkable footage shows the Argentinian legend onboard at the famous Monaco principality. Open cockpits, no seatbelts, and goggle visors. Extraordinarily dangerous, but a combination of incredible skill and bravery assisted the drivers of this era.

16. Alex Zanardi remarkable recovery

Zanardi was unsuccessful in F1, but won titles in American motorsport. He suffered a terrible crash in a CART race in late 2001 in which he lost his legs. Despite nearly dying, he has since overcome all obstacles and returned to racing. He even won a Gold medal at the 2012 London Paralympics. He wrote about his traumatic experience in his autobiography.

17. Professor Sid Watkins’ Services To Safety

The renowned neurosurgeon Sid Watkins was drafted into F1 in the 1970s to improve safety. His extensive work with the FIA has gone beyond F1 and impacted enormously on the road car industry, improving car safety the world over. His work continues to save many millions of lives each year. His book, Life on the Limit, details his inspirational work in F1.

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18. Jenson Button wins – Montreal 2011

Having endured a nightmare of a race, in the closing stages McLaren star Button surged up the order and was able to take the lead on the final lap. This fitting montage from the BBC’s coverage highlights a classic Grand Prix; an example to all of us to never give up.

19. The bizarre 1982 Monaco GP

A chaotic final few laps defined the very best of Formula One at Monte Carlo. A light downpour of rain tested the world’s best drivers to the limit, with dramatic results.

20. F1 in London – 2004

England’s capital was closed off in 2004 for an F1 demonstration run (including a dash through Piccadilly Circus). 500,000 people lined the streets to see the exceptional technology in action, a vivid demonstration of F1’s ability to inspire.

This website is unofficial and is not associated in any way with the Formula One group of companies. F1, FORMULA ONE, FORMULA 1, FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, GRAND PRIX and related marks are trade marks of Formula One Licensing B.V.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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