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15+ Long Distance Relationship Songs To Fit Every Mood

15+ Long Distance Relationship Songs To Fit Every Mood

When you’re in a long distance relationship, sometimes you just need to know you’re not alone. Some days, even the best long distance relationship advice just won’t help you feel any better.

When this happens, take off your thinking cap and turn up the volume. Not sure what to listen to? Here are 15 of the best long distance relationship songs that will speak to you, with a few extra.

1. If you need to be reminded that your long distance relationship is worth it

Listen to

I Want Crazy, by Hunter Hayes.

Why?

This song will help shore up your determination to hang in there by reminding you of three truths: Long distance relationships are difficult. Other people might call you crazy. And your love is worth it!

Best lines

“I don’t want easy, I want crazy
Are you with me baby?”

2. If you feel like your heart and your body are living in different time zones

Listen to

Jet Lag, by Simple Plan

Why?

This song is like a good cup of coffee after a long night–a great pick-me-up. It perfectly captures the LDR whirlwind of hellos, goodbyes, virtual connections, and long distance yearning. It also manages to be catchy and upbeat.

Best lines

“You say good morning
When it’s midnight”

3. If you miss them terribly

Listen to

When You’re Gone, by Avril Lavigne

Why?

Sometimes listening to someone else put words to your pain is cathartic. This song is all about the pain that comes with long distance relationships—the hurts-to-breathe yearning that weighs you down when you’re not sure you’ll make it through one more day apart.

Best lines

“When you walk away
I count the steps that you take”

After that, listen to…

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Aeroplanes, by Futures

Why?

After you’ve gotten some raw anguish out of your system by listening to Avril, transition to something gentler. This song is a lyrical meditation on missing that also weaves in threads of determination and hope.

Best lines

“And I’m gonna build you the house on the water
But first I will build the bridge across”

Need more anthems to missing? Try From Where You Are by Lifehouse. Simple. Heartfelt. Mellow.

4. When you’re done wallowing

Listen to

Ain’t No Mountain High Enough, by Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell

Why?

Catharsis is all well and good, but at some point playing heart-wrenching songs on repeat stops being cathartic and just means you’re wallowing in your pain. So after you’ve had your catharsis pick yourself up off the floor and put on something upbeat.

Best lines

“If you need me call me no matter where you are,
No matter how far; don’t worry baby”

5. If you need to be reminded not to put your life on hold while you’re waiting to be together

Listen to

Many The Miles, by Sara Bareilles

Why?

When you’re in an long distance relationship it’s too easy to start feeling like your “real life” is on hold until you can close the gap. This song will help remind you that your real life is what you’re living today, even if you’re far apart from your favorite person.

Best lines

“But surely something has got to got to got to give
Cause I can’t keep waiting to live.”

6. If you’re wondering what the future holds

Listen to

3000, by The Icarus Account

Why?

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Uncertainty is part of every relationship—especially if you’re long distance. This acoustic gem captures the mishmash of joy, hope, pain, and wondering that so often plagues long distance couples as they wonder about their futures.

Best lines:

And I still fall asleep hoping that you will call
Cause you’re worth waking up for

Want more lyrical wonderings? Try Already Home by A Great Big World or Right Here Waiting by Richard Marx (and, as an added bonus, the 80s hairstyles in this last video will make you laugh).

7. If you’re sure you’ve found your one and only

Listen to

10 Hours, by Warren Barfield

Why?

Sometimes you just know when you’ve found the right one. If you’re not shy about wearing your heart on your sleeve and saying you want forever, this guitar ballad is for you.

Best lines

“And I could love you for a thousand years
And wish for a thousand more”

And if you’ve found your one and only, a single sappy song is never enough, so go have a listen to Westlife’s I Wanna Grow Old With You as well.

8. If you’re feeling wistful

Listen to

A Thousand Miles, by Vanessa Carlton

Why?

This catchy tune somehow manages to be upbeat and inspire a gentle sort of nostalgia at the same time. It’s a great listen when you’re missing someone and wondering if they’re also thinking of you.

Best lines

“I wonder if I could fall into the sky
Do you think time would pass me by?”

Need more wistful soundtracks? Try Here Without You by 3 Doors Down or Leaving On A Jet Plane by John Denver.

9. If you’re wondering how on earth you ended up in a long distance relationship

Listen to

A Lonely September, by Plain White T’s

Why?

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So many long distance relationship couples start out online chatting, texting, or emailing. Then, months down the line, they have the bittersweet realization that they’ve fallen for their long distance buddy.

Best lines

“Well I didn’t mean for this to go as far as it did
And I didn’t mean to get so close and share what we did”

10. If you’re on a road-trip

Listen to

200,000, by The Rocket Summer

Why?

Every road trip needs a catchy, intense anthem to help pass the miles. This upbeat homage to persevering for worthwhile love is a great choice for LDR-roadtrip playlists.

Best lines

“There are not one but two hundred thousand miles on my car. To be with you I’ve driven far, but I loved you that much.”

11. If you’re thinking about all the good times you’ve shared

Listen to

The Promise, by Tracy Chapman

Why?

This song is the perfect soundtrack for a nostalgic stroll down memory lane. It is an earthy, sensual, celebration of love. It speaks of confidence in a shared future together.

Best lines

“If you can make a promise, if it’s one that you can keep
I vow to come for you, if you wait for me”

12. If you need a pick-me-up

Listen to:

Whatever, Whenever, by Shakira

Why?

I dare you to listen to this upbeat tune and not want to dance. It’s hard to stay feeling flat and depressed in the face of this catchy intensity.

Best lines

“Lucky that I love a foreign land for
The lucky fact of your existence”

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13. If it feels like you’ve been apart forever

Listen to

Gone So Long, by Breathe Carolina

Why?

When you’ve been apart from your partner for months you can start to doubt everything from your own feelings to whether you have a future together. It all gets mixed up with missing them. This song captures this confusion with subtle, rhythmic intensity.

Best lines

“Do you still remember my touch at all?
I never meant to be gone so long”

14. If you need some perspectives on your pain

Listen to

Wouldn’t It Be Nice, by The Beach Boys

Why?

Sometimes you just to be reminded that past generations have gone through long distance relationships too, and without email! If you’re feeling old-fashioned (or you’re in the mood for something to make you feel like you’re driving the California coast in a convertible) try this classic by the Beach Boys.

Best lines

“You’re still with me in my dreams
And tonight, girl, it’s only you and me”

Want more old-fashioned without the convertible overtones? Try Unchained Melody by The Righteous Brothers or Oleta Adams’ Get Here.

15. When you’re determined to stick it out

Listen to

I Can Wait Forever, by Simple Plan

Why?

When you’re in this for the long haul (and you’re willing to take some cheese with your boy-band) try this. It’s not going to win any awards for its lyrics, but it gets the main point across loud, clear, and in-tune.

Best lines

“I try to find the words that I could say
I know distance doesn’t matter but you feel so far away”

If you want a classier (although much less literal) alternative, try I Will Wait by Mumford & Sons.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Published on May 18, 2021

How To Improve Listening Skills For Effective Workplace Communication

How To Improve Listening Skills For Effective Workplace Communication

We have two ears and one mouth for a reason—effective communication is dependent on using them in proportion, and this involves having good listening skills.

The workplace of the 21st century may not look the same as it did before COVID-19 spread throughout the world like wildfire, but that doesn’t mean you can relax your standards at work. If anything, Zoom meetings, conference calls, and the continuous time spent behind a screen have created a higher level of expectations for meeting etiquette and communication. And this goes further than simply muting your microphone during a meeting.

Effective workplace communication has been a topic of discussion for decades, yet, it is rarely addressed or implemented due to a lack of awareness and personal ownership by all parties.

Effective communication isn’t just about speaking clearly or finding the appropriate choice of words. It starts with intentional listening and being present. Here’s how to improve your listening skills for effective workplace communication.

Listen to Understand, Not to Speak

There are stark differences between listening and hearing. Listening involves intention, focused effort, and concentration, whereas hearing simply involves low-level awareness that someone else is speaking. Listening is a voluntary activity that allows one to be present and in the moment while hearing is passive and effortless.[1]

Which one would you prefer your colleagues to implement during your company-wide presentation? It’s a no-brainer.

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Listening can be one of the most powerful tools in your communication arsenal because one must listen to understand the message being told to them. As a result of this deeper understanding, communication can be streamlined because there is a higher level of comprehension that will facilitate practical follow-up questions, conversations, and problem-solving. And just because you heard something doesn’t mean you actually understood it.

We take this for granted daily, but that doesn’t mean we can use that as an excuse.

Your brain is constantly scanning your environment for threats, opportunities, and situations to advance your ability to promote your survival. And yet, while we are long past the days of worrying about being eaten by wildlife, the neurocircuitry responsible for these mechanisms is still hard-wired into our psychology and neural processing.

A classic example of this is the formation of memories. Case in point: where were you on June 3rd, 2014? For most of you reading this article, your mind will go completely blank, which isn’t necessarily bad.

The brain is far too efficient to retain every detail about every event that happens in your life, mainly because many events that occur aren’t always that important. The brain doesn’t—and shouldn’t—care what you ate for lunch three weeks ago or what color shirt you wore golfing last month. But for those of you who remember where you were on June 3rd, 2014, this date probably holds some sort of significance to you. Maybe it was a birthday or an anniversary. Perhaps it was the day your child was born. It could have even been a day where you lost someone special in your life.

Regardless of the circumstance, the brain is highly stimulated through emotion and engagement, which is why memories are usually stored in these situations. When the brain’s emotional centers become activated, the brain is far more likely to remember an event.[2] And this is also true when intention and focus are applied to listening to a conversation.

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Utilizing these hard-wired primitive pathways of survival to optimize your communication in the workplace is a no-brainer—literally and figuratively.

Intentional focus and concentrated efforts will pay off in the long run because you will retain more information and have an easier time recalling it down the road, making you look like a superstar in front of your colleagues and co-workers. Time to kiss those note-taking days away!

Effective Communication Isn’t Always Through Words

While we typically associate communication with words and verbal affirmations, communication can come in all shapes and forms. In the Zoom meeting era we live in, it has become far more challenging to utilize and understand these other forms of language. And this is because they are typically easier to see when we are sitting face to face with the person we speak to.[3]

Body language can play a significant role in how our words and communication are interpreted, especially when there is a disconnection involved.[4] When someone tells you one thing, yet their body language screams something completely different, it’s challenging to let that go. Our brain immediately starts to search for more information and inevitably prompts us to follow up with questions that will provide greater clarity to the situation at hand. And in all reality, not saying something might be just as important as actually saying something.

These commonly overlooked non-verbal communication choices can provide a plethora of information about the intentions, emotions, and motivations. We do this unconsciously, and it happens with every confrontation, conversation, and interaction we engage in. The magic lies in the utilization and active interpretation of these signals to improve your listening skills and your communication skills.

Our brains were designed for interpreting our world, which is why we are so good at recognizing subtle nuances and underlying disconnect within our casual encounters. So, when we begin to notice conflicting messages between verbal and non-verbal communication, our brain takes us down a path of troubleshooting.

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Which messages are consistent with this theme over time? Which statements aren’t aligning with what they’re really trying to tell me? How should I interpret their words and body language?

Suppose we want to break things down even further. In that case, one must understand that body language is usually a subconscious event, meaning that we rarely think about our body language. This happens because our brain’s primary focus is to string together words and phrases for verbal communication, which usually requires a higher level of processing. This doesn’t mean that body language will always tell the truth, but it does provide clues to help us weigh information, which can be pretty beneficial in the long run.

Actively interpreting body language can provide you with an edge in your communication skills. It can also be used as a tool to connect with the individual you are speaking to. This process is deeply ingrained into our human fabric and utilizes similar methods babies use while learning new skills from their parents’ traits during the early years of development.

Mirroring a person’s posture or stance can create a subtle bond, facilitating a sense of feeling like one another. This process is triggered via the activation of specific brain regions through the stimulation of specialized neurons called mirror neurons.[5] These particular neurons become activated while watching an individual engage in an activity or task, facilitating learning, queuing, and understanding. They also allow the person watching an action to become more efficient at physically executing the action, creating changes in the brain, and altering the overall structure of the brain to enhance output for that chosen activity.

Listening with intention can make you understand your colleague, and when paired together with mirroring body language, you can make your colleague feel like you two are alike. This simple trick can facilitate a greater bond of understanding and communication within all aspects of the conversation.

Eliminate All Distractions, Once and for All

As Jim Rohn says, “What is easy to do is also easy not to do.” And this is an underlying principle that will carry through in all aspects of communication. Distractions are a surefire way to ensure a lack of understanding or interpretation of a conversation, which in turn, will create inefficiencies and a poor foundation for communication.

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This should come as no surprise, especially in this day in age where people are constantly distracted by social media, text messaging, and endlessly checking their emails. We’re stuck in a cultural norm that has hijacked our love for the addictive dopamine rush and altered our ability to truly focus our efforts on the task at hand. And these distractions aren’t just distractions for the time they’re being used. They use up coveted brainpower and central processes that secondarily delay our ability to get back on track.

Gloria Mark, a researcher at UC Irvine, discovered that it takes an average of 23 minutes and 15 seconds for our brains to reach their peak state of focus after an interruption.[6] Yes, you read that correctly—distractions are costly, error-prone, and yield little to no benefit outside of a bump to the ego when receiving a new like on your social media profile.

Meetings should implement a no-phone policy, video conference calls should be set on their own browser with no other tabs open, and all updates, notifications, and email prompt should be immediately turned off, if possible, to eliminate all distractions during a meeting.

These are just a few examples of how we can optimize our environment to facilitate the highest levels of communication within the workplace.

Actions Speak Louder Than Words

Effective communication in the workplace doesn’t have to be challenging, but it does have to be intentional. Knowledge can only take us so far, but once again, knowing something is very different than putting it into action.

Just like riding a bike, the more often you do it, the easier it becomes. Master communicators are phenomenal listeners, which allows them to be effective communicators in the workplace and in life. If you genuinely want to own your communication, you must implement this information today and learn how to improve your listening skills.

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Choose your words carefully, listen intently, and most of all, be present in the moment—because that’s what master communicators do, and you can do it, too!

More Tips Improving Listening Skills

Featured photo credit: Mailchimp via unsplash.com

Reference

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