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10 Life Difficulties Only Tall People Can Understand

10 Life Difficulties Only Tall People Can Understand

Are you over 6 foot? You probably despise riding public transport and staying over at someone’s place as the couch always tends to be too short. Here are ten more life difficulties any tall person can absolutely relate to:

1. Hearing all those shabby lines and recycled jokes

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    People are not original with their jokes about your height. If you got a dollar each time you hear: “What’s the weather like up there?”, “Can we stand back to back for a pic?”, “Do you play basketball?”, “What did your mother feed you as a child? Miracle Grow?” etc, you’d be a millionaire today. Yet, the most frustrating is that some people still find it witty and are 100% sure you have never heard that before.

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    2. Flying anywhere

    Firstly, you are always asked to put something in the upper baggage storage. Secondly, economy class was not designed with even a single thought for tall people. I don’t even want to mention low-cost airlines where you basically have to sit with your knees pulled up to your chin. Sometimes we just have to splurge for those luxurious seats with extra leg room to sit next to a much shorter passenger who’s still complaining!

    3. Standard-sized furniture

    Kitchen stalls, desks, sofas and even toilets are designed for “normal-sized” people. Your office desk is too low, your chair is uncomfortable in every possible way and you can make it even lower to have your computer at your eye level. You often get cut when slicing veggies and spill salt, sugar or whatever as it’s just too low for you to watch properly what you do. Getting a massage isn’t your best relaxation method either – the tables are always too short.

    4. Pants equal to capris

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      Your awesome cozy pajama pants turn into capris after the first wash. High-waisted shorts are not your thing either as they seriously need to make inseam more than 2 inches. Dresses look like shirts on you and shirts never have the right sleeve and collar length. I know bare ankles are trendy this season, but it’s damn cold in winter!

      5. Talking to shorter companions in loud places

      How many times have you got severe neck pain after having a night out at a crowded bar? Or a music gig? Either you stand in silence and sip your drink or spend the night bending down to hear your mates talks and looking awkward.

      6. Being a grabber

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        Can you, please, fetch me that book/ mag/ cookie/ backpack/ cat from that top shelf/cupboard/overhead storage/tree?

        7. Hiring clothes

        So you need a wetsuit for diving/rafting or sky gliding. Good luck getting a decent size! XL versions will either be too short or too short and too loose. Just deal with the fact that no what epic extreme sports you are doing, people would still laugh at your ridiculous outfit on the photos.

        8. Amusement parks are not your thing.

        You simply don’t fit properly in those tiny roller coaster sits and even if you do, you have serious concerns about your safety and always have to watch your head if there’s a tunnel ahead.

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        9. Being easily spotted

        Gingers have souls

          You always stand out in the crowd, so your friends can easily call you up and you rarely have troubles locating your buddies at jam-packed event either. Yet it get’s really awkward when you try to sneak unnoticed (good luck!), avoid someone or just pretend you didn’t see them (duh, how could you from that high?!). The apogee of this is when random people approach you and ask if you can direct them to their friends.

          10. Caressing is always clumsy

          You think your hugs feel like a clamp. Or worry about smashing into your rib cage. Your partner has to stand up on tip toes when you kiss or you have to lean down really really low if they are shorter. Cheek kisses isn’t your type of greeting either. It’s hard to side-hug someone as either you end up leaning too low to place your arm around their shoulders or they have to clasp you around the waist.

          The struggle is real as a tall person! But overall, the benefits outweigh the difficulties.

          Featured photo credit: mendhak via flickr.com

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          Elena Prokopets

          Freelance Writer

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          Last Updated on December 2, 2018

          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

          When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

          You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

          1. Connecting them with each other

          Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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          It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

          2. Connect with their emotions

          Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

          For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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          3. Keep going back to the beginning

          Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

          On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

          4. Link to your audience’s motivation

          After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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          Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

          5. Entertain them

          While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

          Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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          6. Appeal to loyalty

          Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

          In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

          7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

          Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

          Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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