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Published on January 8, 2021

Here’s a Gentle Reminder That You Will Die One Day

Here’s a Gentle Reminder That You Will Die One Day

One truth that we all know is that one day you will die. All of us will die at some point. And while it’s a sad truth, what’s sadder is that not everyone is able to make the most of their time on there.

According to a study, many people lay on their deathbed with regrets. Regrets about bad decisions they made in the past or living a life that someone else gave them. The list of regrets could go on for a while.

But the beauty of life is that you can still do something about it all.

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Living Life to the Fullest

Lifehack’s CEO, Leon has written an article about how to live life to the fullest. Living life to the fullest comes down to improving the six aspects of your life:

  • Physical health – eating better, exercising, strengthening yourself mentally too.
  • Family and relationship fulfilment – the friends that we make and retain along the way.
  • Work and career prosperity – having a job you love and encourages growth.
  • Spiritual wellness – being able to tap into a world beyond logic.
  • Mental strength – being able to focus, have drive and discipline.
  • Wealth and money satisfaction – living within your means.

Having a balance of those six things is essential to living life to the fullest. However, life often demands more from us in order to achieve those things. At Lifehack, we teach people how to grow the following eight core skills in order to fulfil all the aspects of life:

  • Self-empowerment – having motivation and confidence with what you want to achieve. Ensure your purpose is made clear and know how to stay positive in the moment of adversity.
  • Self-control – setting clear goals and plans for yourself. Build constructive habits and routines that support these goals.
  • Renewable vitality – being physically fit and healthy and getting proper sleep.
  • Mastery over emotions – reframing negativity with positive actions you can take.
  • Conscious communication – understand other people’s ideas and express and deliver thoughts and feelings clearly.
  • Smart focus – completing tasks in the most effective and efficient manner you can.
  • Learning and adaptability – you want to be able to learn and adapt to any knowledge or skill.
  • Constructive thinking – having a clear and uncluttered mind.

Living life to the fullest is not easy, but as long as you keep in mind that one day you’re going to die, you will not waste another second in life. Though as human beings, we sometimes forget about what to live for when we’re too busy surviving. A gentle daily reminder would be nice for us all.

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Your Gentle Reminder – One Day You’re Going To Die

We recently uncovered the company – more specifically a Youtube channel – OLOGY.

The purpose of the channel is to provide gentle reminders that one day you will die. But from that information, the channel is going out of its way to teach people about three core aspects: mindfulness, re-invention, and play.

From those aspects, it provides reminders to make every moment count for something. That everything that you are doing is progressing yourself in some way shape or form.

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OLOGY is running a Kickstarter campaign that pledges to deliver pins, pendants, and visual wall art to remind people that life is fleeting and that it’s important to make the most of it.

    Vita Pendant

    The proceeds will be going towards this project to make it the best that it could be. And it’s had an overwhelming amount of support, raising over $22,000 at the time of writing this – having reached its target donation goal within the first five hours of it launching.

      Life Visualized Wall Art

      These three tools are simple but invaluable as the constant reminder that you will die will push you to make better decisions overall.

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        Know yourself pin

        If you know that you will die eventually, it makes sense that you will strive to make the most of what you’ve got, to make smarter decisions about who you spend time with and what you’ll do every day. Having these little reminders only encourages that way of thinking.

        Furthermore, these tools will be more helpful once the channel starts expanding and developing. Thanks to many people’s support for this, the Youtube channel will only grow and be able to provide invaluable information. Even if the content isn’t coming from trained professionals, the fact this information is coming from everyday people has a level of authenticity and relatedness to it.

        If you also want a gentle reminder to seize every moment in life, back this campaign as these simple tools can help you now and in the future. They’re well worth the investment as the pendants, wall art, and pins are worth more than the donation you spent to receive them. Though you’ll need to be acting quickly as donations will close on February 1st, 2021.

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        If you want to learn more about OLOGY, take the time to watch some of the videos posted by this channel in the future. You’ll receive plenty of information on how to live a better life and to make every moment count.

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        Last Updated on April 19, 2021

        Understanding Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: 5 Levels Explained

        Understanding Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: 5 Levels Explained

        Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a theory of motivation that lists five categories of human needs that dictate individual behavior. These five categories refer to physiological needs, safety needs, love and belonging needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization needs.[1]

        Motivation plays a big part in athletic coaching. I spent 44 years coaching basketball and each day at practice, I was trying to motivate our athletes to give their best effort. In this article, I will examine Maslow’s hierarchy and five areas of needs from an athletic perspective.

        1. Physiological Needs

        These needs represent the most basic human survival needs. They include food, water, rest, and breathing, and all four have importance in athletics.

        Food has had an evolution in the world of athletics. I cannot recall my coaches in the 1950s and ‘60s mentioning anything about food. As time went on, the pre-game meal became important. Steak seemed to be the meal of choice early in the evolution. Research then indicated pasta would be the better choice.[2]

        Today, I think most coaches prefer pasta. However, if the players are ordering from menus, some coaches believe the players should stick with their regular diets and order accordingly.

        The next step in this evolution was that the pre-game meal, although important, is not nearly as critical as the athletes’ overall nutrition. At our University of St. Francis athletic seminars, we invited nutritionists to speak and to educate our players on their nutritional habits.

        The ultimate change in food intake may be the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback, Tom Brady. He adheres to a specific, disciplined diet that has allowed him to play superb football at age 43.

        Water also has had an evolution in sports. It went from not being allowed in practices to coaches scheduling water breaks during the practices.

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        Rest is extremely important in all sports, and statistics validate its importance. NBA research found that during the course of the season teams win 6 of 10 games at home but only 4 of 10 on the road. In the NBA playoffs, the statistics change to 6.5 at home and 3.5 on the road. Many coaches believe rest is the key factor to these statistics because the players are sleeping in their own beds for home games.[3]

        Our St. Francis basketball team found the importance of breathing on a trip to play in a tournament in Colorado. In our first game, we were playing great and winning by 12 points early in the game. Then the altitude kicked in, adversely affected our breathing, and we lost the lead and eventually the game.

        In our second game, having learned our lesson, we substituted more frequently! Maslow’s idea of physiological needs plays a major part in the athletic arena.

        2. Safety Needs

        Safety needs include protection from violence, emotional stability and well-being, health security, and financial security.

        If a fight breaks out during a basketball game, there can be serious injuries. This is the reason a coach steps in immediately when there is any violence or dirty play in practice. The coach must protect the players. You drill your teams to play hard—never dirty.

        The importance of emotional stability has gained more credence in sports in recent years. Many teams hire psychologists to help work with their players. There is a great deal of player failure in sports and it is critical for the players to stay emotionally stable.

        Health security is much more prevalent in sports today than in my playing days. I once got a concussion during a basketball game. We had no trainers. The coach handled it by telling me after the game, “Sullivan, you play better when you don’t know where the hell you are!” He was right, and my medical treatment ended there! Games today have trainers available to protect the health of the athletes.

        Financial security is predominant in professional sports. Most players today use free agency to go where the money is because they consider sport not to be a sport at all. They believe it is a short-term business at their level. I personally appreciate the athletes who have taken less money so the team can retain teammates or use the dollars to bring in new players.

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        3. Love and Belonging Needs

        These needs can be summed up with two words: love and relationships.

        After teams win championships, you will often hear coaches say, “I love these guys” or “I loved coaching this team.” You can tell by their body language and the tone of their voice that they really mean it.

        I think coaches say this because the season can be a tough grind. Practices, scouting, film work, travel, and problems that arise take a toll on coaches. However, when you have teams that give all they have every night in practice, you do come to love them.

        ESPN did a 30-30 segment on the North Carolina State national championship team coached by Jim Valvano. I was especially interested in watching it because I knew a player on the team who used to come to our camps. Terry Gannon played a major role in their championship.

        The program was a reunion of their players. This was 20 plus years from their title, and if you were to take one thing away from the show, it would be how much the players loved each other.

        In the last analysis, sport is all about relationships. You can meet former teammates with whom you played 40 to 50 years earlier and that athletic bond is as strong as it ever was. Although you may have not seen each other in years, your friendship is so cemented it’s like you have been seeing each other weekly.

        David Halberstam’s book, The Teammates: A Portrait of a Friendship, validates the relationship between athletics forges. Ted Williams is dying and three of his former Boston Red Sox teammates—Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky, and Dom DiMaggio—make the trip to Florida to see him. Even though 50 years had passed since they played together, the bond among them never waned.

        Love and belonging epitomize the essence of sports.

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        4. Esteem Needs

        These needs are characterized by self-respect and self-esteem. Self-respect is “the belief that you are valuable and deserve dignity.” Self-esteem is twofold—“it is based on the respect and acknowledgment from others and esteem which is based on your own self-assessment.”[4]

        Often the players on the bench are the ones the coach respects the most because they work so hard in practices yet receive none of the glory. The best coaches never let the starters or stars ever denigrate the players on the bench. Coaches must always acknowledge the value and the dignity of those who play little. They often turn out to be the superstars of their professions.

        Some coaches will never get “it.” They think they can motivate their players by degrading them. They embarrass the athletes during games and they constantly berate their performance in practices.

        Great coaches are just the opposite. They are encouragers. They do push their players and they push them hard, but they always respect them. Great coaches enhance the self-esteem and confidence of their players.

        5. Self-Actualization Needs

        “Self-actualization describes the fulfillment of your full potential as a person.”[5]

        I believe three words are the key to self-actualization: potential, effort, and regrets.

        You often hear in athletics that a player has potential. It also is not uncommon for the person introducing the athlete to rave about his potential. I was fortunate to work with an outstanding man in the Milwaukee Bucks camps, Ron Blomberg. Ron had the best definition of potential that I ever heard: “Potential means he hasn’t done it.” Will he do all the work necessary to fulfill his potential?

        Effort is great, but it’s not enough. If you want to reach your full potential, you must have a consistency of effort in your daily habit. Only consistency of effort can lead to success.

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        John Wooden, the legendary UCLA basketball coach, said that success is becoming all your ability will allow you to be. He agreed with his friend, major league umpire, George Moriarty, even though he used to kid him. Coach told him he never had seen Moriarty spelled with just one “i.” He followed this with, “Of course, the baseball players accused him of having only one ‘eye’ in his head as well.”

        In his poem, The Road Ahead or The Road Behind, Moriarty wrote,

        “. . . for who can ask more of a man
        than giving all within his span, it seems to me, is not so far from – Victory.

        When your life is winding down and you look back if you can say you gave “all in your span”—that you consistently gave it your best effort—you will have reached your full potential and there will be no regrets.

        Final Thoughts

        Now that you’ve learned more about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, consider reflecting on the last two needs (esteem needs and self-actualization needs) and ask yourself the following questions:

        • Are you doing all you can to enhance the self-esteem of those around you?
        • Are you doing all you can to self-actualize the potential you have been given?

        Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

        Reference

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