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Last Updated on December 18, 2020

Here’s How to Take a Better Break. You’ve Been Doing Wrong All The Time

Here’s How to Take a Better Break. You’ve Been Doing Wrong All The Time

Whenever you dearly want to take a break from your regular work and unwind a bit, what do you do? You turn on that TV, power on your laptop for a movie or take a quick nap, maybe, since it is what the present-day tech-savvy generation does. If your definition of taking a break isn’t anything about taking a walk, laughing outside with colleagues, watching the sunset or doing anything that primarily involves outdoors, then you have been living a lie!

Nir Eyal who authored “Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products” is here with an eye-opening post on what many of us do all the time, wrongly. Breaks ought to be refreshing and energizing, and science even says so. Yet you are here, busy with Instagram in one hand and a packet of popcorns on the other.

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Good breaks should break fatigue, boost brain function and reinvigorate the body

A break shouldn’t drain and deplete your brain, and that means it shouldn’t be something that involves your brain. He bases his thoughts on a neuroscientist and a psychologist who agree that no form of breaking should include using a smartphone to relax the mind. According to him, even that mere act of “repeatedly checking our phone,” what you have unknowingly done countless times since checking in to your office, is induced by what you do in the name of taking a break!

Want to take a break and unwind using some of the science-supported facts?

It’s effortless; go natural by taking a walk around your neighborhood or in the city, gaze at those fresh flowers around your patio or look at some photos of nature. You are encouraged to doodle and daydream too, or laugh out loud like a madman – it increases heart rate and respiration and removes tension. You may also head to the gym and lift those weights, dance at the local fitness center or go for a jog.

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Science backs these suggestions

What the writer here does is, he doesn’t bombard your mind with half-truths and rumors without any factual research behind them. For every suggestion he makes, backs it up with an undisputed fact, generally using books written by distinguished persons. It is interesting that all the break ideas are doable and just need a few minutes of your time, yet their impact is profound.

The suitability of this post to what you could be craving to have right now also augurs well with your need for productivity after the break. If feel like glancing at that phone severally or tired mentally with zero creativity, go through it.

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To read the full article, click here.

Featured photo credit: Kuo-Chiao Lin via unsplash.com

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Samantha Aloysius

Samantha is an everyday health expert with a background in International Public Health and Psychology.

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Last Updated on January 22, 2021

5 Simple Stretches to Boost Your Energy at Your Office Desk

5 Simple Stretches to Boost Your Energy at Your Office Desk

Everyone knows that sitting for long periods of time is bad for your body and your mind. Getting the blood flowing helps you stay fresh with creativity, boosts energy, and helps your body work more efficiently. Many of us don’t have the opportunity to get up and move around as often as we should, but simple stretches added in during the day can help.

Studies have found that prolonged sitting can lead to increased risk in obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, deep-vein thrombosis, and metabolic syndrome. Sitting is also known to increase pain by tightening the hip flexor and hamstring muscle, as well as stiffening the joints. This can cause problems with balance and gait in addition to the obvious discomfort.[1]

One study found that “greater total sedentary time” and “longer sedentary bout duration” were both associated with a higher risk of death. Basically, those who moved around less were more likely to die from any cause[2].

While many of us have busy schedules that limit the amount of time we can exercise each day, doing simple stretches throughout the day at your desk can be a great option to encourage movement, even if it’s just for a few minutes.

Here are 5 simple stretches you can do while sitting to improve your mind and body.

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1. Seated Twist

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    Sitting in your chair while keeping a long, tall spine, place your right hand on the outside of your left knee. Use that hand as leverage to twist to your left, and place your left hand as far to the right as possible to have something to hang onto while you twist. Now join it with your breath.

    Exhale as you move into your twist, and inhale as you ease off. Repeat on the other side. Repeat for each side 2-3 times.

    This simple stretch is great to offer a release for your back, neck, and shoulders. The twist will also help rinse out your internal organs, giving you a little boost of energy.

    2. Chest/Shoulder Opener

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      Sitting on the edge of your chair, clasp your hands behind your back, opening up your chest and shoulders. Inhale/exhale several times, noticing that when you inhale your stretch increases. Release and repeat 2-3 times.

      This stretch, while aimed at the chest muscles, can also alleviate some upper back pain, as we often feel pain in this area when our chest muscles are tight. This will also open up your lungs, allowing you to take some deep breaths, which can help reduce stress.

      3. Seated Pigeon

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        I call this one Seated Pigeon as it is a cousin to the yoga pose called Pigeon, which is performed lying on the floor. Clearly this isn’t an option at work. This Seated Pigeon version might not work if you are wearing a short skirt or dress unless you have an office to yourself!

        Sit on the edge of your chair and place your right ankle over your left knee. Be sure that your left foot is directly under your left knee and flat on the floor. Sit nice and tall, imagining a string is pulling the crown of your head up towards the ceiling.

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        This one is great for releasing your gluteus medius and minimus muscles, as well as your piriformis muscles. These are your hip abductors. These are usually what aches when you sit so much! Hold each stretch for about 30 seconds, and repeat on each side 2-3 times.

        This will offer a great release in the hips, as well as create stability in the knee joint. Both of these will help you avoid pain once you get up to leave work for the day.

        4. Hip Flexor Stretch

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          Sitting truly shortens and tightens your little hip flexor. This sits at the front in the crease of your hip. It runs through your pelvis to your back, so when it is tight, it often presents with an achy back.

          To lengthen this muscle while at your desk, sit at the edge of your chair, but shift to face to your left. Take your right leg and extend it behind you with as straight a knee as you can. Sit tall, and lift your sternum while trying to tuck your tailbone under, as this will deepen the stretch.

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          Repeat on the other side. Repeat for both sides 2-3 times.

          5. Hamstring Stretch

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            This is an easy one to do either just before you sit down or just after getting up. While standing, soften your right knee and extend your left leg in front of you with your heel on the floor. On your left leg, draw your toes upwards, keep your knee slightly bent so you don’t strain your ligaments behind your knee.

            You want to feel the stretch in the belly of the muscle (that is, your mid-thigh, at the back of your leg) rather than behind the knee. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds and switch to the other side. Repeat each side 2-3 times.

            Stretching out your hamstring can help relieve knee and lower back pain. It can also help increase your balance and range of motion. If you like to spend your free time running or jogging, your hamstrings will be grateful you took a moment to stretch them out at work as these muscles are notorious for tightening up quickly.

            The Bottom Line

            It isn’t necessary to do all of the stretches all at once. Take a stretch break every 45 minutes or so and choose a couple of different stretches. Next time, choose a different set of simple stretches. Ultimately, your brain and body will thank you for it!

            More Stretches for Your Day

            Featured photo credit: Keren Levand via unsplash.com

            Reference

            [1] Harvard Health Publishing: The dangers of sitting
            [2] Annals of Internal Medicine: Patterns of Sedentary Behavior and Mortality in U.S. Middle-Aged and Older Adults

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