Advertising

Last Updated on December 18, 2020

Would You Like To Think Out Of A Different Box?

Advertising
Would You Like To Think Out Of A Different Box?

Creativity, for us normal people, is like water in the desert. Sometimes its here when it rains, and sometimes it dries up. You can never expect its presence but to hope and pray for it to come. Yet this god-gifted talent is extremely useful for industries like fashion, design, product research development, marketing and the list goes on. But all hope is not lost because creativity is something that we can try to nurture and well since art is subjective, we can all learn to be as creative as possible with the help of these books.

Remember those great Volkswagen ads? by Alfredo Marcantonio, David Abbott, John O’Driscoll

    We cannot forget to mention the industry highly dependent on creativity here. Remember those great Volkswagen ads? is the comprehensive compilation and review of the revolutionary Volkswagen advertising campaign in the1960s and 70s (when Facebook has not appeared) and advertisements were about print ads in newspapers and magazines.

    The campaign by this world-renowned automobile brand is universally acknowledged to be the greatest and most influential campaign recognised by Advertising Age and Times. The book covers advertisements on the classic VW Beetle, the Van, Bus and Camper, capturing the golden age of advertising and the classic use of creativity, which still plays an important role in business creativity.

    Reading duration: 5hrs 9mins

    Advertising

    Get Remember those great Volkswagen ads? from Amazon at $46.28

    Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

      Millions of people worship Steve Jobs, the icon of design and innovation. What is so successful with Steve Jobs? And how did he created the empire of Apple Inc.?

      The biography of the genius is compiled with three years of interviews with Steve Jobs, portraying Jobs success, Apple, his family members and key colleagues from Apple and its competitors. No one needs one persuasive reason to read this book if you are already holding the world-changing device created and inspired by this technology giant.

      Reading duration: 9hrs 17mins

      Advertising

      Get Steve Jobs from Amazon at $11.83

      Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelley, David Kelley

        As a child, you’re told to “go and have fun”, to explore, to fail, to try again, and again and again. The bumps and bruises aren’t a bad thing, they’re your badge of honour: you’ve tried, you’ve persevered. And then you hit a certain more adult age and you’re told: “to be careful, to study/work hard and to do your best”.

        The Kelly brothers believed there is always a creative inner me within us, which is only hidden by the way we were brought up. Failing at certain tasks can provoke our creative soul, and inspire alternative thinking. The book suggests creativity does not end in art or design, it is also about education, problem-solving, and innovation.

        Reading duration: 4hrs 18mins

        Advertising

        Get Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All from Amazon at $19.00

        Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin Kleon

          Austin Kleon told the truth about creativity, that few artists can admit to, that nothing is completely original, and all creative work builds on what came before. Every new idea is a remix or mash-up of one or two previous ideas.

          The book Steal like an Artist introduce principles to creativity such as “don’t wait until you know who you are to get started”, “go away so you can come back”, definitely not the normal principles but sentences that reflects and inspires readers to re-think about their choices they make. “Nobody is born with a style or a voice. We don’t come out of the womb knowing who we are. In the beginning, we learn by pretending to be our heroes. We learn by copying.”

          Reading duration: 2hrs 16mins

          Advertising

          Get Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative from Amazon at $9.89

          Where good ideas come from the natural history of innovation by Steven Johnson

            The printing press, the pencil, the flush toilet, these are all great ideas. But where do they come from? Steven Johnson’s identifies the seven key patterns of innovation and creativity, including 1. the adjacent possible, 2. liquid networks, 3. the slow hunch, 4. serendipity, 5. error, 6. exaptation, 7. platforms.

            Johnson addressed one of the reasons why big cities are so much more innovative than small towns is that you have more diversity, more “spillover” of ideas, and more chance for the ideas to mingle around together, mainly because ideas take time to form and cultivate.

            Reading duration: 4hrs 52mins

            Advertising

            Get Where good ideas come from the natural history of innovation from Amazon at $13.83

            More by this author

            Lifehack Reads

            Lifehack Reads is the curated collection of our favorite books, carefully categorized and sorted by our Editorial Team.

            What To Do When Someone Moves Your Cheese? Balancing The Tight Rope Of Your Personal And Professional Life The Not So Secret To Being Happier Are You Working Now To Create A Happiness For Your Future? 5 Fearless Books To Read If You Want To Chase Your Fears Away

            Trending in Creativity

            1 What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It 2 11 Ways to Think Outside the Box 3 How to Be More Creative and Come up with Incredible Ideas 4 How to Be Innovative and Creative at Work 5 How Design Thinking Leads You To Creativity (The Complete Guide)

            Read Next

            Advertising
            Advertising

            Last Updated on July 21, 2021

            What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

            Advertising
            What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

            Do you think of yourself as a creative person? Do you play the drums or do watercolor paintings? Perhaps compose songs or direct plays? Can you even relate to any of these so called ‘creative’ experiences? Growing up, did you ever have that ‘artistic’ sibling or friend who excelled in drawing, playing instruments or literature? And you maybe wondered why you can’t even compose a birthday card greeting–or that drawing stick figures is the furthest you’ll ever get to drawing a family portrait. Many people have this common assumption that creativity is an inborn talent; only a special group of people are inherently creative, and everyone else just unfortunately does not have that special ability. You either have that creative flair or instinct, or you don’t. But, this is far from the truth! So what is creativity?

            What Is Creativity?

            Creativity Needs an Intention

            Another misconception about the creative process is that you can just be in a general “creative” state. Real creativity isn’t about coming up with “eureka!” moments for random ideas. Instead, to be truly creative, you need to have a direction. You have to ask yourself this question: “What problem am I trying to solve?” Only by knowing the answer to this question can you start flexing your creativity muscles. Often times, the idea of creativity is associated with the ‘Right’ brain, with intuition and imagination. Hence a lot of focus is placed on the ‘Right’ brain when it comes to creativity. But, to get the most out of creativity, you need to utilize both sides of your brain–Right and Left–which means using the analytical and logical part of your brain, too. This may sound surprising to you, but creativity has a lot to do with problem solving. And, problem solving inherently involves logic and analysis. So instead of throwing out the ‘Left’ brain, full creativity needs them to work in unison. For example, when you’re looking for new ideas, your ‘Left’ brain will guide you to a place of focus, which is based on your objective behind the ideas you’re searching for. The ‘Right’ brain then guides you to gather and explore based on your current focus. And when you decide to try out these new ideas, your ‘Right’ brain will give you novel solutions outside of the ones you already know. Your ‘Left’ brain then helps you evaluate and tune the solutions to work better in practice. So, logic and creativity actually work hand in hand, and not one at the expense of the other.

            Advertising

            Creativity Is a Skill

            At the end of the day, creativity is a skill. It’s not some innate or natural born talent that some have over others. What this means is that creativity and innovation can be practiced and improved upon systematically.A skill can be learned and practiced by applying your strongest learning styles. Want to know what your learning style is? Try this test. A skill can be measured and improved through a Feedback Loop, and can be continuously upgraded over time by regular practice. Through regular practice, your creativity goes through different stages of proficiency. This means that you can become more and more creative! If you never thought that creativity was relevant to you, or that you don’t have a knack for being creative… think again! You can use creativity in any aspect of your life. In fact you should use it, as it will allow you to to break through your usual loop, get you out of your comfort zone, and inspire you to grow and try new things. Creativity will definitely give you an edge when you’re trying to solve a problem or come up with new solutions.

            How Creativity Works

            Let me break another misconception about creativity, which is that it’s only used to create completely “new” or “original” things. Again, this is far from the truth. Because nothing is ever completely new or original. Everything, including works of art, doesn’t come from nothing. Everything derives from some sort of inspiration. That means that creativity works by connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value.From this perspective, you can see a lot of creativity in action. In technology, Apple combines traditional computers with design and aesthetics to create new ways to use digital products. In music, a musician may be inspired by various styles of music, instruments and rhythms to create an entirely new type of song. All of these examples are about connecting different ideas, finding common ground amongst the differences, and creating a completely new idea out of them.

            Advertising

            Can I Be Creative?

            The fact is, that everyone has an innate creative ability. Despite what most people may think, creativity is a skill that everyone can learn and hone on. It’s a skill with huge leverage that allows you to generate enormous amounts of value from relatively little input. How is that so? You’ll have to start by expanding your definition of creativity. Ironically, you have to be creative and ‘think out of the box’ with the definition! Creativity at its heart, is being able to see things in a way that others cannot. It’s a skill that helps you find new perspectives to create new possibilities and solutions to different problems. So, if you encounter different challenges and problems that need solving on a regular basis, then creativity is an invaluable skill to have.Let’s say, for example, that you work in sales. Having creativity will help you to look for new ways to approach and reach out to potential customers. Or perhaps you’re a teacher. In this role, you have to constantly look for new ways to deliver your message and educate your students.

            Start Connecting the Dots

            Excited to start honing your creativity? Here at Lifehack, we’ve got a wealth of knowledge to help you get started. We understand that creativity is a matter of connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value. So, if you want to learn how to start connecting the dots, check out these tips:

            Advertising

            Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

            Advertising

            Read Next