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In the Hot Seat: The Comatose Brought To Life

In the Hot Seat: The Comatose Brought To Life

Hollywood has given us plenty of stories about people who wind up in a coma. In some cases, they never wake up. In others, they go through a series of odd dreams and revelations in their minds before they miraculously rejoin the waking world.

A few of these stories seem realistic, but often these episodes are highly dramatised tools for storytelling. Here at Lifehack, we wondered what it would actually be like to wake up from a coma. Do patients hear or experience anything in their unconscious state? Do they gain some greater knowledge about the universe while they are in a coma.

To help us answer this question, we’ve got Jeff in the hot seat. He spent some time in a comatose state and lived to tell the tale.

Life changes in the blink of an eye

Lifehack: How did you end up in a coma?

Jeff: I got into a serious car wreck. When we impacted the car in front of us, my head slammed into the dashboard.

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Lifehack: How long were you unconscious?

Jeff: I was out for 8 weeks before I remember anything. Even after I started to wake up, it was several weeks before I was able to sit up, stay awake for long periods of time, and walk. I spent months going through rehab after I woke up.

Lifehack: What have you learned from the experience?

Jeff: Your life can change in the blink of an eye. One minute, you’re heading out to see your friends and having the time of your life. The next thing you know, all those little things that you take for granted are taken from you. There’s no guarantee that you’ll get them back.

I’m one of the lucky ones. The doctors were pretty sure that I was going to be in a vegetative state. They had discussions with my family about “pulling the plug.”

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Lifehack: How did your family handle the situation?

Jeff: My family didn’t want to hear that I might not pull through. My mom, dad, and sisters took shifts sitting by my bedside in the hospital. At first, they weren’t really allowed to say or do much because in order for my brain to heal, I had to be in a low-stimulus environment.

My little sisters were there when I had my first flash of consciousness. They have helped me with my rehabilitation. There’s no way I could have recovered without them.

Lifehack: What did you experience while in a coma?

Jeff: I didn’t understand the passage of time at all while I was unconscious. I do remember being in a white room. It was totally empty except for the chair I was sitting in. I don’t remember what I did there, but it was like I expected something to happen.

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Lifehack: How did you feel after waking up?

Jeff: Terrified. When I woke up I had no idea what was happening to me, where I was, how long I had been out, or why my sisters were crying. The fear didn’t last long though because they kept me pretty doped up on medication for the first couple days of being awake.

After that, I remember feeling lots of confusion and frustration. I was not able to speak because there was a tube down my throat. I couldn’t move my limbs at first. When they finally sat me up for the first time, I was so nauseous that they had to lay me back down. I realized I was going to have to relearn how to do a lot of things.

Lifehack: Did you experience any memory loss or revelations?

Jeff: I don’t remember the three weeks before the accident at all. I didn’t even remember why I was in the car until someone else told me.

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I also did some things while I was waking up. At one point, I started asking for my wallet because I wanted to give my mom some money. I have no idea why I felt like I needed to pay her, and I don’t recall the incident. We can laugh about it now.

As for revelations, I didn’t figure out the meaning of life or anything. There was just a white room.

Lifehack: What are you thankful for from this experience?

Jeff: I’m so grateful that I was given a second chance at life. If I hadn’t had such excellent medical care and the love of my family, I wouldn’t be here today. Every day you can be awake and a part of the world is a beautiful day.

Seeing the world through new eyes

Jeff’s experience changed the way he looks at life. Hearing him speak about his experience with coming out of a comatose state was a good reminder to appreciate everything we have.

Featured photo credit: Peter Heeling via skitterphoto.com

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Anna Chui

Anna is a communication expert and a life enthusiast. She's the editor of Lifehack and loves to write about love, life, and passion.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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