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Learn To Master A Skill Successfully With This

Learn To Master A Skill Successfully With This

The Practicing Mind is a bestselling book written by a piano technician who used to work at a performance venue for guest concert pianists. The author, Thomas M. Sterner, held a very demanding job, preparing pianos and thus in the everyday challenges of his job managed to gain the inspiration to write the book. And by packaging his experiences in a 150-page, easy-to-read book, he has helped countless students and adult alike.

The Practicing Mind isn’t just an ordinary book. It offers invaluable tips and strategies for someone practicing to master a skill, whether it is golfing, music or just anything that is skill-based. During those times when you are tirelessly struggling to acquire a talent to help you defeat a formidable challenge, it is only patience, focus and disciple that would dictate your success. And in this bestseller, Thomas Sterner shows precisely how to gain the skills, learn from failures and eventually be a success.

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    Learn through practice

    Every skill in life is learned through trial-and-error practices and never giving up in the face of failure. In the study, the author notes the principles of training, the procedure of picking an objective and working towards achieving it. He teaches that procedure done right isn’t slavery, but rather a technique of mastering a fulfilling process that will inevitably build discipline, perfection, and success.

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    Finding joy in your pursuit of success

    The highlight of the book is what the author advocates for – finding joy in your pursuit of success instead of having a notion that happiness would only arrive at the finishing line. He says that a lot of stresses we usually encounter is as a result of failing to relish the moment and worrying about other goals, tasks, and commitments that belong to the future.

    By reading the book, some of the information you will find helpful includes:

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    • Practicing towards a goal is better than merely having it.
    • Life is all about practice, and good practice is enjoyable – it isn’t hectic and stressful.
    • Active practicing differs from passive learning.
    • The Japanese plate story and why you need someone to ensure you do the job right.
    • Goals are like a rudder on a boat and offer direction.
    • Judging your work doesn’t get the job done.
    • Your goal is a compass – not a buried treasure.
    • The most important part of entrepreneurship is subdividing your limiting beliefs – not money.
    • The Zen concept of a beginner’s mind.
    • Habits are second nature – practice your skill, and it will soon be a habit.
    • Make time to sit and relax.

    The Practicing Mind is accessible to all passionate readers of whatever philosophical backgrounds and offers helpful tips and strategies for anyone wishing to learn a skill or expertise. Irrespective of your perspective, you will not go wrong with this book’s insightful and compelling tips. It is available online for purchase.

    Reading duration: 3 hours 28 minutes

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    Get The Practicing Mind from Amazon at $12.22.S

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    Trending in Restore Energy

    1 Why Am I So Tired Even After Rest? 2 Why You Shouldn’t Ignore Your Fatigue Symptom (& How to Boost Energy) 3 7 Signs You’re Burnt Out and How to Bounce Back 4 How to Relieve Stress: 9 Quick Relaxation Techniques 5 How to Get the Best Deep Sleep (And Why It’s Important)

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    Last Updated on October 16, 2019

    Why Am I So Tired Even After Rest?

    Why Am I So Tired Even After Rest?

    I used to go home and just lie on the sofa after work to rest.  Later, I wanted to spend more time for self-improvement. Unfortunately, the only time I had to cut into was my “rest” time, which I started replacing with actions like exercising and reading books instead. To my surprise, I didn’t feel more tired. It actually made me feel more refreshed!

    When I looked into what “rest” really is, I found that it’s a poorly understood subject, and why many people often feel tired even if they “rest” a lot.

    What Everyone Is Wrong About Resting

    Letting your mind run free is the quickest path to exhaustion. Most people tend to define rest as:

    • Lounging on the sofa or laying in bed
    • Doing nothing (is that even possible?)
    • “Netflix and chill”
    • Not doing chores

    And while your body is in a relaxed posture, your mind isn’t. Rest is a mental activity, not just a physical one.  When you engage in the activities like those in the list above, you encourage mental activity that is counterproductive to rest.

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    Mindlessly watching television, browsing the internet or reading tweets isn’t mindless at all. This type of mental engagement and stimulation can actually leave you more tired than you were initially. Your brain is not only quietly processing all that you are taking in, it is also preparing for and encouraging you to socialize[1]. A recent study[2] found that when the brain isn’t actively engaged in a conscious activity, it shifts into a state of prep for social interaction with others.

    Another important fact to consider is that the brain needs something to focus on in order to achieve a state of symbiotic rest. It needs a purpose.

    Think about an activity requiring very little focus and attention–such as showering. Most times you are thinking about other things and your mind is busy working out problems and connecting dots. This type of mental activity is necessary and beneficial but it chases away rest. Letting your mind run free is the quickest path to exhaustion.

    Human feelings are unreliable. When we trust our feelings, very likely we’d just lie on sofa after a day of work, even if we know for our health’s sake we should exercise for 30 minutes. On weekends, we tend to oversleep as we “feel” that we need more sleep, though that actually disrupts our sleeping patterns.

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    Like taking rest, simply being yourself isn’t necessarily relaxing. When we rely on our feelings, we end up feeling more tired.

    What Is Rest, Really?

    Rest is an activity. It is not a state of “doing nothing”.  Below are 2 important ways to trigger your brain into actively engaging in rest. They directly oppose what society typically considers rest and relaxation but I challenge you to give them a try.

    Switch Between Tasks That Are Opposite in Nature

    If you are working at the computer, after a few hours, switch to a more physical task, or go for a walk or short run. If you are working on a very technical and detail oriented project, switch to working on something requiring a bit more creativity. After being in meetings all day or giving a presentation, work on a quiet task, alone that does not involve other people such as balancing your checkbook or prepping food for dinner.

    As you participate in each activity, be sure you are practicing mindfulness — or being fully present — as you engage in each activity.

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    The key here is to remember the brain needs and likes focus. After engaging in some of the tasks above, you are most often tempted to just “veg out”.  Giving into this feeling will sap you of the remaining energy you have left.

    Have Light Exercise

    Exercise is the cure for what ails us. Moderate exercise reduces stress,[3] increases productivity, overall health and wellness and prolongs life. Research shows that regular amounts of light exercise are one of the best treatments for those suffering from exhaustion and fatigue.[4]

    This fact holds true for those with sedentary or physically demanding jobs. Whether you are in a tiny cubicle sitting all day or working at a dock loading and unloading heavy freight, studies show that light amounts of exercise beyond your daily routine helps your mind and body achieve rest.

    A study conducted by researchers at the University of Georgia[5] found that moderate and low-intensity workouts increase feelings of energy.

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    “A lot of people are overworked and not sleeping enough,” said Patrick O’Connor, co-director of the university’s exercise psychology laboratory. “Exercise is a way for people to feel more energetic. There’s a scientific basis for it, and there are advantages to it compared to things like caffeine and energy drinks.”

    In the study, research subjects were divided into three groups. One group was prescribed 20 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise three times a week for six weeks. The second group engaged in low-intensity aerobic exercise for the same time frame and the third group–which was the control group– did not exercise at all. Both groups of exercisers experienced a 20 percent boost in energy levels compared to the group of non-exercisers.

    Researchers also discovered that intense exercise is less effective at mitigating fatigue than low-intensity workouts. The low-intensity group reported a 65 percent drop in fatigue levels, while the high intensity group reported a 49 percent drop. It’s important to note that any exercise is better than no exercise.

    Bottom Line

    In order to truly feel rested and refreshed, it’s time to develop a new norm and give our mind and body what it actually needs to rest.

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    Featured photo credit: Rafal Jedrzejek via unsplash.com

    Reference

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