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Last Updated on February 27, 2018

The Two Ends Of Love and What Lies Between, Or Is There A Between?

The Two Ends Of Love and What Lies Between, Or Is There A Between?

Love is a feeling of affection from one person towards another. While there are perhaps one thousand and one definitions for love from the human perspective, the best way to experience it is only when it is reciprocated. Love has many shades – you know those fleeting emotions that works up our feelings and heightens our interest in the other person while we are practically trying to find meaning for these feelings. Of course, real love exists but what Elyane Youssef communicates in the article Healthy Love versus Obsessive Love—& how to Get Over the Obsessive Kind shows how to identify the not so brazen difference between what love is and what it is believed to be.

Can You Answer What Love is?

Healthy love traits

The word love is loosely used these days to describe feelings of attraction, but love is more than feelings. Real, healthy love is simple and seeks to look for the other person’s good and comfort above your own. Healthy love draws its root from selflessness, open-mindedness, trust with each individuals happiness not necessarily dependent on the other person. Real love blossoms out of respect for one another and learning to go so separate ways if it fails.

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Obsessive love traits

Obsessive love is selfish and non-sacrificial. If there is any sacrifice at all, it is because of what they intend to gain later down the line. There is always no regard for the other person’s happiness and the goal is to possess the one we claim to love. It is controlling, jealous and lacks trust. Obsessive love does not like the truth; it exists in disguise and exposes both individuals involved to harm on the long run.

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Breaking away from obsession

Give love. Receive love. Repeat.”

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Obsessive love in itself should never be described as love because it fails to live up to the billing in every way. Notwithstanding, situations leading to obsessive love can be avoided at times. You may find yourself in an unexpected loop and instead of hanging on, and pushing for the light at the end of the tunnel, which is definitely lacking in this case, it is best you break it off. Breaking it off as a matter of fact cannot be achieved easily because the relationship is a predator prey relationship. What is best is a tactical approach that appraises the situation while using the opportunity to learn what true love is all about. Learning about true love can start from identifying the things you didn’t get from your supposed lover and identifying areas you have failed. That way, you avoid leaving one obsessive relationship for another.

There is an indisputable fact. If you give love – pure, honest true love, just like you want it reciprocated you are bound to get the same. Why don’t you then give love to receive more love? The French would say encore to that.

To read the full article, click here.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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