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Pick Your Job Based On What You Love To Do, Not How Much You Have Invested In.

Pick Your Job Based On What You Love To Do, Not How Much You Have Invested In.

Have you ever continued to pursue something even though it no longer served you? Maybe it’s a degree program or the dead-end job that you refuse to give up. Perhaps you’ve stayed in a relationship for no other reason than the fact that you’ve been committed to it for so long. From time to time, we all justify staying the course by considering the effort we’ve put into our current situation.

Many of us decide to take a job just because it’s a good use of our training. When we invest time and money in getting a degree, we expect that we should use it. Maybe you hate your job, but you can only envision yourself taking similar positions with equal or greater pay and responsibility. You may feel trapped by the decisions you made before, but you don’t have to be.

Whatever you do, do it because you love it.

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    When you are trying to figure out how to decide on a career, it is easy to be influenced by the types of work and training you’ve already undertaken. In general, you get a degree or training in a field that interests you, and this leads you to a job in that field.

    If you should ever decide to leave your job, there’s a high probability that you will look for work in the same field with similar pay and responsibilities. You are less likely to consider whether you still like the work that you do — you feel obligated to continue your career trajectory regardless of how you feel.

    This is how people get stuck doing jobs that they don’t like. Instead of thinking about what would make you the best and happiest version of yourself, you may face temptation to maintain the status quo. Many of us do this because we fear wasting our efforts.[1]

    Others feel that their persistence will eventually be valued, and changing course doesn’t fit well within the story they are creating about themselves or their business.[2] They may willingly take on sunk costs with the belief that their situation will improve.

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    Don’t get sucked in by sunk costs.

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      The sunk cost fallacy is the assumption that you must continue follow a trajectory because you have already put lots of resources into that particular career path or personal endeavor. We can be so loss-averse that we avoid the possibility of greater gains through changing our approach.[3]

      If you are wondering how to decide on a career, and you take a job solely because it makes use of your years of training, then you might be worrying more about sunk costs than your future happiness and success. Refusing to leave a career that is unfulfilling could be a sign that you are caught in the job investment trap, which is a variation of the sunk cost fallacy.[4]

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      Businesses also fall into this pattern of continuing down a failing path just because they already put time and money into initiatives. For example, an entrepreneur might take out a loan to open a second business location. They reason that since business is booming at Location #1, success in Location #2 should be a cinch.

      After about a year, the owner realizes that Location #2 is hemorrhaging money, and the only way to stop the bleeding is to scale back to one store. The numbers don’t lie, but despite the irrefutable evidence, the owner may still have trouble cutting his or her losses. The business owner thinks about the effort, time, and emotion that went into Location #2.

      From an outsider’s perspective, it is easy to see that the business owner in the example or the person stuck in an uninspiring career should try something new. It is harder to let go of sunk costs when we are faced with them ourselves.

      You aren’t a one-trick pony.

      Just because you took a particular course of study in school doesn’t mean that you are bound to that discipline for the rest of your life. When you are figuring out how to decide on a career, ask yourself the following questions:

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      • What are you interested in doing? If you are passionate about your work, then it won’t feel like a burden.
      • What skills do you need to do this job? We often think of our degree or primary training as our default career option, but the default may not be the best choice. If you need to change focus, what transferable skills do you have, and what additional training will you need to be successful?[5]
      • Is there room for growth in this job? Today, the average employee stays with a company for 4.2 years before moving on.[6] What types of skills can you build in your current work? How can you leverage your growth to position you for a fulfilling career?
      • Do you have opportunities to work with different people? Forming meaningful connections with people is one of the best things you can do for yourself professionally. You’ll not only be happier at work, but if you decide to change careers, you will already have a solid professional network. [7]
      • What can this job offer you in 3 years? Consider your expectations for income and authority-level in the next three years. Is this job going to give you what you want? If not, how will taking this position help you work toward your end goal?
      • Can this job help you to become the kind of person you want to be? Being inspired by the work that you do can brighten even the toughest days. Do you feel that your work is meaningful?[8] Does it bring you closer to being the optimal of yourself?

      Know when to hold and when to fold.

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        You can’t recover sunk costs, but you don’t have to perpetuate a cycle of loss. “I’ve already put so much time into this,” isn’t a good enough justification to continue down a particular path.

        Deciding to change directions doesn’t meant that you have failed. It makes zero sense to continue to put resources into something that isn’t working for you. Although you may feel like you have wasted an experience or lost time, remember that you have probably learned some valuable information as you undertook the process. Just because it didn’t go the way you expected doesn’t mean that it’s a total loss.

        Being successful and following your dreams are not mutually exclusive. Use what you know to keep growing, and don’t be discouraged if you have to change course along the way.

        Reference

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        Angelina Phebus

        Writer, Yoga Instructor (RYT 200)

        Foods That Can Suppress Appetite And Help With Weight Loss Quality or Quantity? Why Don’t You Sleep On It What it Feels Like To Be The Child of Your Children? Pick Your Job Based On What You Love To Do, Not How Much You Have Invested In. How to Become Successful 10 Times Easier: Don’t Focus on Improving Your Faults

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        Last Updated on July 18, 2019

        How to Sharpen Your Transferable Skills For a Swift Career Switch

        How to Sharpen Your Transferable Skills For a Swift Career Switch

        Most people grow up with dreams to go to college and graduate with high-paying job offers waiting for them the week after graduation. Others may favor non-traditional career paths. But the desire is the same: to find a job we love where compensation is commensurate with experience.

        However, plans change. For instance, what started out as a dream to be a surgeon is cut short by a nasty injury and you’re debating how to transition into a new role. Or you might be facing being let go from your current employer and are anxious about “options out there.”

        Whatever the case may be, switching careers can be intentional or unintentional. What matters is that you’re well-prepared, and the only way to do so is to learn new skills — hone in on your transferable skills.

        Why Hone in on Your Transferable Skills?

        There are several reasons you need to develop these skills if you want to go far in life and your career. In a nutshell, honing in your your transferable skills can lead to:

        Better Job Offers

        Continuous assessment and improvement of your skills widens the pool of job offers for you to make selections from. You’re no longer tethered to one industry as you’re able to lead your career by design, not by default.

        People with transferable skills on a resume also open up opportunities for more potential employers.

        Increase in Pay and More Responsibilities

        You’ve heard the saying “with great power come great responsibility.” In your case, transferable skills make you more marketable to employers which could lead to pay raises.

        Although this isn’t an automatic process– you have to be proactive about what you want in the marketplace, there is a chance that these pay raises will come with change in titles and roles.

        A Shot at Entrepreneurship

        Yes, changing career paths also includes the possibility of working for yourself. With these skills and work experience, you could live anywhere in the world and design a life and career you want.

        We’ve talked about why you need to strengthen your transferable skills but what are some these skills, and how can you work on them?

        13 Tips to Sharpen Your Transferable Skills

        1. Update Your Resume

        You might be surprised to know this but yes, updating your resume is a skill. The very first thing you should do while thinking about switching careers is to highlight attributes that make you very desirable candidate to employers.

        Think about your volunteer experiences, freelance projects, and school projects. Although they might seem insignificant, they demonstrate your ability to deliver results that several companies are looking for.

        While you might have held several positions since college, switching careers will require you to have a different type of resume.

        There are three different types of resumes: functional, chronological, and a combination resume. However, if you are looking to switch careers you’ll want to have a functional resume. A functional resume is strengths-based that emphasizes skills that are transferable rather than a collection of dates and job titles.

        2. Brush up on Your Communication Skills

        Every attempt to get ahead in business and in life starts with the need to communicate effectively. Whether it is interpersonal, intercultural, or multi-generational, the ability to be seen and heard while respecting the boundaries of work relationship matters.

        That’s why it’s one of the top skills you need to master. Strong communication skills allows you to effectively tailor your messages to specific audiences, which will make you a stronger asset to any organization.

        To hone this skill:

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        Pay attention to your listening skills. To communicate effectively, you need to first learn how to understand others.

        Your ability to decode overt and implied messages, no matter how nuanced they are, is key to knowing how to foster deep relationships with others.

        This article can also give you effective ways to enhance your communication skills:

        How to Master Effective Communication Skills at Work and Home

        3. Learn Technical (or Business) Writing

        Another form of communication, writing, is a skill that can take you anywhere.

        Companies communicate a lot through written memos, emails, newsletters, and other audio-visual means. But at the crux of this all is someone or some people who are tasked with translating the organization’s vision into statements anyone can understand.

        To hone this skill:

        Consider taking some free or paid classes online. You can accomplish this through several community colleges or online platforms like Lynda, Udemy or edX .

        4. Practice Public Speaking and Presentation Skills

        No matter how intelligent you are, no one will take you seriously if you’re unable to pull off a decent level of persuasion through presentation skills.

        Most presentation can be done through either electronic devices or require your physical presence. Your chosen career may require you to be in front of several hundreds of people or you could be charged with developing materials for presentation.

        To hone this skill:

        Volunteer to lead projects that give you some responsibility for putting together presentations.

        Also, try taking courses that will improve your public speaking skills if you feel lacking.

        These tips on public speaking would be helpful too:

        The Ultimate Public Speaking Tips to Hook and Impress Any Audience

        5. Get Comfortable with Identifying Problems and Solutions

        Every organization has got its problems no matter how greener the grass is on the other side.

        How to hone this skill:

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        Practice being resourceful.

        Do you know where to find every company policy on the intranet in less than five minutes?

        Think about a time you noticed some inefficiency at work and proposed a solution. Think about instances where you lent your voice to a cause which resulted in improved processes for your department.

        No matter how small or inadequate you might feel, you’ve got some problem-solving skills that some organizations want.

        If you look for more ways to improve your problem solving skills, take a look at this article:

        6 Effective Ways to Enhance Your Problem Solving Skills

        6. Recognize Your Team-Building Ability

        Your ability to smoothly switch careers also depends on how well you can energize your team, especially if you’re aiming for a leadership role. Unfortunately, team-building usually isn’t something you learn on the job in most careers unless you hold a managerial position.

        The good thing is that you possibly know one or two things about team-building. Think back to moments in college when you had group projects with colleagues and had to work with 3 to 4 other strangers for months. Were you able to get past your differences and disagreements to focus on the uniqueness of everyone at the table?

        Making a career switch might require that you work with multidisciplinary teams whether you have a deep knowledge of what the other team does or not. I can easily think of doctors, nurses, physical therapists, and social workers working closely to achieve the goals in a patient’s care plan.

        How to hone this skill:

        Look for collaborative projects and team building activities that excite you and challenge yourself with new possibilities.

        Try some of these tactics to keep your team motivated as well:

        17 Proven Tactics for Motivating Employees and Building a Stronger Team

        7. Lean into Your Leadership Skills

        Although similar to the previous point, leadership skills extend far beyond building teams, managing time sheets and correcting behavior.

        What I’m referring to here is your ability to develop a vision, believe in it, and inspire buy-in from everyone involved. This isn’t about knowing how to run a particular machine; it’s about how to lead a team of people with various backgrounds, experiences, and ideas of how things should be done.

        How to hone this skill:

        Although more complex than the rest, it all starts with an introspective look into your strengths and weaknesses. Then get a mentor or a coach who can bring out your leadership qualities so you can operate from a place of strength.

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        Learn more about the effective leadership types here:

        5 Types of Leadership that Help You Build a High Performance Team

        8. Improve Your Analytical Skills

        Are you good at taking large amount of data and interpreting them? Your skills could come in handy.

        Organizations are looking for people to make sense of the data around them, explain how it affects profitability, and make projections based on it. Best of all? You don’t need to be an accountant to be analytical.

        How to hone this skill:

        Try taking data interpretation classes online or at a community college. Learning Microsoft Excel or Access is also a plus. If you’re ambitious enough, you could consider getting additional certifications to up the ante.

        Take a look at these ways to help sharpen your analytical skills:

        What Are Analytical Skills and How to Strengthen Them For Success

        9. Don’t Discount Your Time Management and Prioritization Skills

        How good are you when it comes to deciding how important tasks are, organizing schedules, and coordinating plans?

        Should you be willing, there is a market waiting for you out there. Organizations and busy executives are always looking for talented individuals to outsource these tasks to.

        How to hone this skill:

        Although not everyone possesses secretarial superpowers, you can improve this skill by focusing on taking huge tasks and breaking them into smaller goals or steps in order to achieve a bigger goal.

        Here, you can learn to prioritize to achieve more:

        The Ultimate Guide to Prioritizing Your Work And Life

        10. Embrace Your Creative and Critical Thinking Side

        Although it’s often believed that creativity is for the arts and right-brained people, I believe everyone is capable of being creative. In fact, most organizations recognize creativity as a vehicle that will drive successful inventions in the future.

        How to hone this skill:

        Try doing something fun. As simple as this sounds, you’d be surprised to learn how much. In fact, behavioral and learning scientist, Marily Oppezzo, says taking a walk might be all you need to get your creative juices flowing.[1]

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        Anyone can be creative, you just need the right way to train your brain:

        What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

        11. Don’t Stop Learning Tech Knowledge and Skills

        Being tech-savvy is a huge plus. If you have an affinity with computers, software applications and are abreast of technological improvements, it is a transferable skill that is worth highlighting.

        You don’t have to be a young college graduate with silicon valley dreams to work

        How to hone this skill:

        All you need is the determination and the readiness to learn. This article will give you some ideas on the types of skills to learn:

        How to Improve Your Computer Skills to Get Ahead in Your Career

        12. Build Networks and Relationships

        You aren’t free from networking. Not at the moment. With your goal to switch to a different career, your networking skills will come in handy.

        Fortunately for you, networking doesn’t have to be so hard.

        How to hone this skill:

        Attend conferences and job fairs. Chances are you already have people in your network you can move you closer to your dream career.

        To enhance your networking skills, take these steps:

        How to Network So You’ll Get Way Ahead in Your Professional Life

        Final Thoughts

        Although there are several people with the same qualification and degree(s) you possess, what ultimately determines hireability comes down to a myriad of things such as culture fit, how teachable you are, cultural sensitivity, inter-generational awareness, and your ability to navigate uncertainty.

        You have a chance to stand out by letting your dream companies know how these soft skills make you an invaluable asset, and how saying ‘YES’ to you is a win-win for both parties.

        Happy career switching!

        More Resources About Career Advancement

        Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

        Reference

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