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The One Practice That Will Help You Face with Every Challenge Much More Easily

The One Practice That Will Help You Face with Every Challenge Much More Easily

Do you see a challenge and immediately start feeling anxious? Do you worry that you won’t be able to make your dreams come true because of the roadblocks in your path? We’ve all been there—but you don’t have to keep looking at problems in the same way forever—value-based affirmations have the potential to make your life a lot easier.

It can be very difficult to prepare yourself for a challenge or roadblock, because emotions can so easily take over.[1] This can paralyze your decision-making, and make it difficult for you to find the best solution or meet the challenge head on. While simply taking a deep breath and diving in might seem like the best way to proceed, it doesn’t help you find the right solution or help dispel your anxiety about the situation.

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We all have challenges and goals in life, but if you don’t have a method for meeting these challenges, then you may not be able to achieve success as often as you’d like. The good news is that there’s one simple (but not easy) practice that will help you face any challenge you come across: value-based affirmation. This practice will help you lead a more empowering and focused life, and you’ll likely experience less stress by having a method for meeting challenges head on. So how does it work?

Visualizing what you want beyond the roadblocks is the key to overcome them

Mindset has a huge impact on how you deal with problems and challenges, and value-based affirmations affect your overall mindset to help you succeed.[2] So how does value-based affirmation work? Basically, it is a practice in which you see the desired result in your head before you begin a task. The idea is to affirm your own values before you begin in order to be more open to the change ahead and avoid getting in your own way. Value affirmation may be the reason that people tend to only make healthy changes in their lives once they’ve realized the importance of doing so on their own—not because of someone else telling them they should eat well, exercise, or even meditate.[3]

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This is why you need to work on visualizing what you want, in order to overcome challenges in front of you. An example of how value-based affirmation works would be visualizing the desired outcome of a test (seeing an A) or running and completing a marathon—then having the willpower and motivation to make that visualization reality. In practical application, this can be very powerful—a friend of mine, who had twice failed the CFA exam tried this practice—and ended up acing the test through value-based affirmation. See the outcome, don’t say it.

Try using value-based affirmation on small things first

Now, you can’t just start off using this technique and expect to run a marathon immediately. You have to develop your skills and belief in the practice before you can use it to meet a very demanding task. Instead, try using value-based affirmation on a task that you know you can accomplish, but is slightly challenging. Building on these successes will allow you to develop the technique and use it to meet even the most difficult challenges over time.

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Don’t let obstacles stop you. The right mindset helps you get through them

If you’ve ever been discouraged about achieving your dreams, practicing value-based affirmation could help you reach them—provided you use the technique to develop the right mindset. Many entrepreneurs have successfully used the practice to design the future structure and success of their business before they even get it off the ground. Seeing the success they want allows them to face setbacks and make good decisions during the challenging first few years in business.

Many successful celebrities have also used mindset to become the best of the best in their industries. Michael Jordan, for example, used a form of this technique on the road to becoming arguably the greatest basketball player of all time. Jordan practiced the growth mindset, which allowed him to push through innumerable setbacks. His own words sum up why using value-based affirmations is so important to success:[4]

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“If you’re trying to achieve, there will be roadblocks. I’ve had them; everybody has had them. But obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.”

Visualizing that success beyond the roadblocks is the first step in getting past them. And the best part? You don’t need any special skills to successfully leverage this technique, and it can work for everyone. You just have to start using it and believing it—the rest will follow.

Reference

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Last Updated on February 11, 2021

20 Amazing Facts About Dreams that You Might Not Know About

20 Amazing Facts About Dreams that You Might Not Know About

Dreams — Mysterious, bewildering, eye-opening and sometimes a nightmarish living hell. Dreams are all that and much more.

Here are 20 amazing facts about dreams that you might have never heard about:

Fact #1: You can’t read while dreaming, or tell the time

    If you are unsure whether you are dreaming or not, try reading something. The vast majority of people are incapable of reading in their dreams.

    The same goes for clocks: each time you look at a clock it will tell a different time and the hands on the clock won’t appear to be moving as reported by lucid dreamers.

    Fact #2: Lucid dreaming

    There is a whole subculture of people practicing what is called lucid or conscious dreaming. Using various techniques, these people have supposedly learned to assume control of their dreams and do amazing things like flying, passing through walls, and traveling to different dimensions or even back in time.

    Want to learn how to control your dreams? You can try these tips:

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    Lucid Dreaming: This Is How You Can Control Your Dreams

    Fact #3: Inventions inspired by dreams

    Dreams are responsible for many of the greatest inventions of mankind. A few examples include:

    • The idea for Google -Larry Page
    • Alternating current generator -Tesla
    • DNA’s double helix spiral form -James Watson
    • The sewing machine -Elias Howe
    • Periodic table -Dimitri Mendeleyev

    …and many, many more.

    Fact #4: Premonition dreams

    There are some astounding cases where people actually dreamt about things which happened to them later, in the exact same ways they dreamed about.

    You could say they got a glimpse of the future, or it might have just been coincidence. The fact remains that this is some seriously interesting and bizarre phenomena. Some of the most famous premonition dreams include:

    • Abraham Lincoln dreamt of His Assassination
    • Many of the victims of 9/11 had dreams warning them about the catastrophe
    • Mark Twain’s dream of his brother’s demise
    • 19 verified precognitive dreams about the Titanic catastrophe

    Fact #5: Sleep paralysis

    Hell is real and it is called sleep paralysis. It’s the stuff of true nightmares. I’ve been a sleep paralysis sufferer as a kid and I can attest to how truly horrible it is.

    Two characteristics of sleep paralysis are the inability to move (hence paralysis) and a sense of an extremely evil presence in the room with you. It doesn’t feel like a dream, but 100% real. Studies show that during an attack, sleep paralysis sufferers show an overwhelming amygdala activity. The amygdala is responsible for the “fight or flight” instinct and the emotions of fear, terror and anxiety. Enough said!

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    Fact #6: REM sleep disorder

    In the state of REM (rapid-eye-movement) stage of your sleep your body is normally paralyzed. In rare cases, however, people act out their dreams. These have resulted in broken arms, legs, broken furniture, and in at least one reported case, a house burnt down.

    Fact #7: Sexual dreams

    The very scientifically-named “nocturnal penile tumescence” is a very well documented phenomena. In laymen’s term, it simply means that you get a stiffy while you sleep. Actually, studies indicate that men get up to 20 erections per dream.

    Fact #8: Unbelievable sleepwalkers

      Sleepwalking is a very rare and potentially dangerous sleep disorder. It is an extreme form of REM sleep disorder, and these people don’t just act out their dreams, but go on real adventures at night.

      Lee Hadwin is a nurse by profession, but in his dreams he is an artist. Literally. He “sleepdraws” gorgeous portraits, of which he has no recollection afterwards. Strange sleepwalking “adventures” include:

      • A woman having sex with strangers while sleepwalking
      • A man who drove 22 miles and killed his cousin while sleepwalking
      • A sleepwalker who walked out of the window from the third floor, and barely survived

      Fact #9: Dream drug

      There are actually people who like dreaming and dreams so much that they never want to wake up. They want to continue on dreaming even during the day, so they take an illegal and extremely potent hallucinogenic drug called Dimethyltryptamine. It is actually only an isolated and synthetic form of the chemical our brains produce naturally during dreaming.

      Fact #10 Dream-catcher

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        The dream-catcher is one of the most well-known Native American symbols. It is a loose web or webs woven around a hoop and decorated with sacred objects meant to protect against nightmares.

        Fact #11: Increased brain activity

        You would associate sleeping with peace and quiet, but actually our brains are more active during sleep than during the day.

        Fact #12: Creativity and dreams

        As we mentioned before, dreams are responsible for inventions, great artworks and are generally just incredibly interesting. They are also “recharging” our creativity.

        Scientists also say that keeping a dream diary helps with creativity.

        In rare cases of REM disorder, people actually don’t dream at all. These people suffer from significantly decreased creativity and perform badly at tasks requiring creative problem solving.

        Fact #13: Pets dream too

          Our animal companions dream as well. Watch a dog or a cat sleep and you can see that they are moving their paws and making noises like they were chasing something. Go get ’em buddy!

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          Fact #14: You always dream—you just don’t remember it

          Many people claim that they don’t dream at all, but that’s not true: we all dream, but up to 60% of people don’t remember their dreams at all.

          Fact #15: Blind people dream too

          Blind people who were not born blind see images in their dreams but people who were born blind don’t see anything at all. They still dream, and their dreams are just as intense and interesting, but they involve the other senses beside sight.

          Fact #16: In your dreams, you only see faces that you already know

            It is proven that in dreams, we can only see faces that we have seen in real life before. So beware: that scary-looking old lady next to you on the bus might as well be in your next nightmare.

            Fact #17: Dreams tend to be negative

            Surprisingly, dreams are more often negative than positive. The three most widely reported emotions felt during dreaming are anger, sadness and fear.

            Fact #18: Multiple dreams per night

            You can have up to seven different dreams per night depending on how many REM cycles you have. We only dream during the REM period of sleep, and the average person dreams one to two hours every night.

            Fact #19: Gender differences

            Interestingly, 70% of all the characters in a man’s dream are other men, but women’s dream contain an equal amount of women and men. Also men’s dreams contain a lot more aggression. Both women and men dream about sexual themes equally often.

            Fact #20: Not everyone dreams in color

            As much as 12% of people only dream in black and white.

            Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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